An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 635
implicit function
  کریای ِ درتاهی   
karyâ-ye dartâhi

Fr.: fonction implicite   

A function which contains two or more variables that are not independent of each other. An implicit function of x and y is one of the form f(x,y) = 0, e.g., 4x + y2 - 9 = 0. See also → explicit function.

implicit; → function.

implode
  فروکفتن، فروکفتیدن   
forukaftan, forukaftidan

Fr.: imploser   

To collapse, or cause to → collapse, inward → violently. Opposite of → explode.

Implode, from → in- + (ex)plode, from L. plaudere "to clap, beat," of uncertain origin.

Forukaftidan, from foru- "down, downward; below; beneath" (Mid.Pers. frôt "down, downward;" O.Pers. fravata "forward, downward;" cf. Skt. pravát- "a sloping path, the slope of a mountain") + kaftidan "to burst; to split," variants kaftan, kâftan "to split; to dig," (Parthian Mid.Pers. q'f- "to split;" Sogdian "to spli;" Chorasmian kf- "to split, be split;" Proto-Iranian *kap-, *kaf- "to split").

implosion
  فروکفت   
forukaft

Fr.: implosion   

A violent inward collapse; the act of imploding; opposed to → explosion.

Verbal noun of → implode.

imply
  درتاهیدن   
dartâhidan

Fr.: impliquer   

1) To involve or indicate by inference, association, or necessary consequence rather than by direct statement .
2) To contain potentially.
3) To express indirectly (Merriam-Webster.com).

Infinitive of → implication.

import
  دربرتیدن، دربرت   
1) darbartidan; 2) darbart

Fr.: import   

1a) To bring in (merchandise, commodities, workers, etc.) from a foreign country for use, sale, processing, reexport, or services.
1b) Computers: To bring (documents, data, etc.) into one software program from another.
2) The act of importing or bringing; something that is imported (Dictionary.com).

From im-, variant of → in- + port, → export.

important
  گرین   
garin

Fr.: important   

Of great significance or effect.

From M.Fr. important, from M.L. importantem, from importare "be significant in," from importare "bring in," → in- "into, in" + portare "to carry."

Garin, on the model of Kurd. giring "important," related to girân, gerân "heavy, important;" Mid.Pers. garân, Proto-Ir. stem *garu-; cf. Av. gouru-; Skt. guru- "heavy, important, venerable;" L. gravis "weighty, serious, heavy," → gravity.

impose
  برنهادن   
barnehâdan

Fr.: imposer   

1) To lay on or set as something to be borne, endured, obeyed, fulfilled, paid, etc.
2) To put or set by or as if by authority (Dictionary.com).

M.E., from O.Fr. imposer "put, place; impute, charge, accuse," from → in- "into, in" + poser "put, place," → position.

Barnehâdan, literally "to place on, upon," from bar-, → on-, + nehâdan "to put, place," → compose.

imposing
  برنها، برنهنده، برنهان   
barnehâ, barnehandé, barnehân

Fr.: imposant   

Very impressive because of great size, stately appearance, dignity, elegance, etc. (Dictionary.com).

impose; → -ing.

imposition
  برنهش   
barneheš

Fr.: imposition   

1) The laying on of something as a burden or obligation.
2) Something imposed, as a burden or duty; an unusual or extraordinarily burdensome requirement or task.
3) The act of imposing by or as if by authority (Dictionary.com).

impose; → -tion.

impossible
  ناشدنی   
nâšodani (#)

Fr.: impossible   

Not possible; unable to be, exist, happen. Unable to be done, performed, effected.

in-; → possible.

impostor
  دغلکار   
daqalkâr

Fr.: imposteur   

On who pretends to be what he is not.

M.Fr. imposteur, from L.L. impostor, agent noun from impostus, from imponere "to place upon, impose upon, deceive," from → in- "into, in, on, upon" + ponere "to put place," → position.

Daqalkâr, from daqal "imposture, deceit" + -kâr, agent noun suffix, from kardan, → -or.

imprecise
  ناپرسون   
nâparsun

Fr.: imprécis   

Not precise; not exact; vague.

From im-, variant of → in- + → precise.

imprecision
  ناپرسونش   
nâparsuneš

Fr.: imprécision   

The quality of lacking → precision.

From im-, variant of → in- + → precision.

impress
  درهاویدن   
darhâvidan

Fr.: imprimer; impressionner   

1) To press, to apply with pressure, especially to leave a mark.
2) To produce a profound effect upon the mind.

in-; → press.

impression
  درهاوش   
darhâveš

Fr.: impression   

1) A strong effect produced on the intellect, feelings, conscience, etc.
2) The first and immediate effect of an experience or perception upon the mind (dictionary.com).

press + -ion variant of → -tion.

impressionable
  درهاویدنی   
darhâvidani

Fr.: impressionnable   

Capable of being impressed; easily impressed.

impress; → -able.

impressionism
  درهاوشگرایی   
darhâvešgerâyi

Fr.: impressionisme   

1) A style of painting developed in the last third of the 19th century, characterized chiefly by short brush strokes of bright colors in immediate juxtaposition to represent the effect of light on objects.
2) A manner of painting in which the forms, colors, or tones of an object are lightly and rapidly indicated.
3) A manner of sculpture in which volumes are partially modeled and surfaces roughened to reflect light unevenly (Dictionary.com).

impression; → -ism.

impressive
  درهاونده   
darhâvandé

Fr.: impressionnant   

Having the power to impress, to raise admiration, awe, respect, etc.

impress; → -ive.

impulse
  تکانه   
tekâné (#)

Fr.: impulsion   

Of a force acting on a body, the → product of the → force and the → time for which it acts. If the force changes with time, the impulse is the → integral of the force with respect to the time during which the force acts, and is equal to the total change of → momentum produced by the force: ∫F dt = ∫m dv. Impulse is a → vector quantity.

From L. impulsus "a push against, pressure, shock," p.p. of impellere "to push, strike against, drive forward," from → in- "into" + pellere "to push, drive."

Tekâné, from tekân "involuntary motion, sudden shaking," related to tak "rush, quick motion, stroke, blow" (tâxtan, tâzidan "to run; to hasten; to assault"); Mid.Pers. tak "assault, attack;" Av. taka- "leap, run," from tak- "to run, flow;" cf. Skt. tak- "to rush, to hurry," takti "runs;" O.Ir. tech- "to flow;" Lith. teketi "to walk, to flow;" O.C.S. tešti "to walk, to hurry;" Tokharian B cake "river;" PIE base *tekw- "to run; to flow;" → flow.

impulse-momentum principle
  پروز ِ تکانه-جنباک   
parvaz-e tekâné-jonbâk

Fr.: principe impulsion-quantité de mouvement   

The vector → impulse of the → resultant force on a particle, in any time interval, is equal in magnitude and duration to the vector change in momentum of the particle: ∫F dt = mv2 - mv1. The impulse-momentum principle finds its chief application in connection with forces of short duration, such as those arising in collisions or explosions. Such forces are called → impulsive forces.

impulse; → momentum; → principle.

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