An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

   Homepage   
   


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

<< < B r bac Bal Bar bar bea beh Bes bia Big bin bin bip Bla bla bli blu Boh Bon Bot bow bre bri bro bur > >>

Number of Results: 486
blister
  تاول   
tâval (#)

Fr.: ampoule   

A small cyst on the skin, containing watery liquid, as from a burn or other injury.

M.E. blister, blester, from O.Fr. blestre, of Germanic origin.

Tâval "blister" (variants Torbet-Heydariye-yi toval, Guqari tavol), from suffixed (-al) tâv- tav, taf- "to heat, burn, shine," variant of tâb-, tâbidan "to shine," → luminous.

blister model
  مدل ِ تاول   
model-e tâval

Fr.: modèle d'ampoule   

A model according to which an → H II region is a hot mass of ionized gas located on the surface of a → molecular cloud, like a blister on the body skin.

blister; → model.

blitzar
  درخشار، بلیتزار   
deraxšâr, blitzâr

Fr.: blitzar   

A new type of astronomical object, appearing as an intense → burst of → radio emission, proposed to explain → fast radio bursts. In some models, blitzars result from the sudden → collapse of a hypothetical → supermassive neutron star.

From Ger. Blitz, "→ flash, lightening," + -âr ending component, as in → pulsar.

blizzard
  دمه   
damé (#)

Fr.: blizzard   

A severe weather condition characterized by high winds (at least 55 km/h) and reduced visibility due to violent snowstorm.

Blizzard, of unknown origin.

Damé "wind and snow storm."

blob
  ژیگ   
žig

Fr.: tache, concentration, condensation   

1) General: Drop of liquid; small round mass (e.g. wax); spot of color.
2) Astro.: A relatively → small, → unresolved source lying toward a much larger structure. → high-excitation blob.

From M.E. bubelen "to bubble."

Žig "drop," probably from žohidan "to drop," variant of cakidan "to drop."

blood
  خون   
xun (#)

Fr.: sang   

The red liquid that circulates in the arteries and veins of humans and other vertebrate animals, carrying oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the tissues of the body (OxfordDictionaries.com).

M.E. blo(o)d, O.E. blôd; akin to O.Frisian, O.Saxon blôd, O.H.G. bluot (Ger. Blut), Gothic bloth.

Xun, from Mid.Pers. xûn; cf. Sogd. xurn, Khotanese hûna, Yaghnobi waxin, Av. vohunī,

blooming
  سرریز   
sar-riz

Fr.: blooming, bavure   

In a → CCD detector, the spill of charge to adjacent → pixels due to over-illumination by a too bright source. Same as charge bleeding.

Blooming "glare," from to bloom "to glare, glow."

Sar-riz "spill-out, overflowing," from sar "top," → head, + riz "pouring," from rixtan "to pour," → overflow.

blow
  دمیدن   
damidan (#)

Fr.: souffler   

1) To move along, carried by or as by the wind.
2) To produce or emit a current of air, as with the mouth or a bellows.
3) Of a horn, trumpet, etc.) to give out sound.
4) To make a blowing sound; whistle (Dictionary.com).

M.E., from O.E. blawan "blow, breathe, make an air current; kindle; inflate; sound a wind instrument;" cf. O.H.G. blaen, Ger. blähen; from PIE *bhle- "to swell, blow up."

Damidan, from Mid.Pers. damidan "to blow, breathe;" dam "breath, breath of an owen; bellows; smoke; air," also "moment, time;" Av. dāδmainya- "blowing up;" cf. Skt. dahm- "to blow," dhámati "blows;" Gk. themeros "austere, dark-looking;" Lith. dumti "to blow;" PIE dhem-/dhemə- "to smoke, to blow."

blue
  آبی   
âbi (#)

Fr.: bleu   

The hue of that portion of the visible spectrum lying between green and indigo, evoked in the human observer by radiant energy with wavelengths of approximately 420 to 490 nanometers.

From O.Fr. bleu, P.Gmc. *blæwaz, from PIE base *bhle-was "light-colored, blue, blond, yellow."

Âbi "color of water," from âb "water," Mid.Pers. âb, O.Pers./Av. âp-, Skt. âp-, PIE *âp-; → Aquarius.

blue compact dwarf galaxy
  کهکشان ِ کوتوله‌ی ِ آبی ِ همپک   
kahkešân-e kutule-ye âbi-ye hampak

Fr.: galaxie naine bleue compacte   

An small → irregular galaxy undergoing → violent star formation activity. These objects appear blue by reason of containing clusters of hot, → massive stars which ionize the surrounding interstellar gas. They are chemically unevolved since their → metallicity is only 1/3 to 1/30 of the solar value. Same as → H II galaxy.

blue; → compact; → dwarf; → galaxy.

blue continuum
  پیوستار ِ آبی   
peyvastâr-e âbi

Fr.: continuum bleu   

The → continuum emission of an astronomical source with wavelengths between about 492 and 455 nm.

blue; → continuum.

blue giant
  غول ِ آبی   
qul-e âbi

Fr.: géante bleue   

A giant star with spectral type O or B.

blue; → giant.

Qul, → giant; âbi, → blue.

blue halo star
  ستارگان ِ آبی ِ هاله   
setâregân-e âbi-ye hâlé

Fr.: étoiles bleues du halo   

A star belonging to a variety of stars located above the → horizontal branch and blueward of the → red giant branch in the → Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of the → halo population.

blue; → halo; → star.

Setâregân plural of setâré, → star, âbi, → blue, hâlé, → halo.

blue HB star
  ستاره‌ی ِ BHB   
setâre-ye BHB

Fr.: étoile BHB   

Same as → blue horizontal branch star.

blue; → horizontal; → branch; → star.

blue hook star
  ستاره‌ی قلاب آبی   
setare-ye qollab-e abi

Fr.: étoile du crochet bleu   

A rare class of → horizontal branch (HB) stars that so far have been found in only very few Galactic → globular clusters. These stars are such called because they form a blue hook at the hot end of the HB in → far ultraviolet (FUV) → color-magnitude diagrams. The physical mechanism that produces blue hook populations is still uncertain. At least two scenarios have been proposed.
In the first scenario these stars are explained as a consequence of extreme → mass loss during the → red giant branch phase and late helium flashing while descending the → white dwarf cooling track. Due to the thin residual hydrogen envelope, helium is mixed into the envelope and hydrogen is mixed into the core during the late → helium flash. As a result, the stars are hotter and UV-fainter than canonical → extreme horizontal branch stars (EHB).
By contrast, in the He self-enrichment scenario the EHB and blue hook stars are produced via the normal evolution of He-enriched sub-populations in globular clusters. These sub-populations might have formed from the ejecta of intermediate-mass → asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars of the first generation of stars. For the same age and → metallicity, He-enriched HB stars have smaller masses than normal HB stars, resulting in bluer → zero age horizontal branch star (ZAHB) locations. They are also brighter in the FUV, but this effect is reversed for very hot He-enriched HB stars with → effective temperatures larger than 19000 K.
See Dieball A., et al., 2013, arXiv:0901.1309v1, and for blue hook stars in ω Cen cluster, M. Tailo et al., 2015, Nature 523, 318.

blue; → hook; → star.

blue horizontal branch star
  ستاره‌ی ِ آبی ِ شاخه‌ی ِ افقی   
setâre-ye âbi-ye šâxe-ye ofoqi

Fr.: étoile bleue de la branche horizontale   

A member of a population of blue stars appearing on the → horizontal branch in the → Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of the Galactic → halo populations and → globular clusters. Belonging to → spectral types B3 to A0, they have evolved past the → red giant stage and are burning helium in their core.

blue; → horizontal; → branch, → star.

blue jet
  شان ِ آبی   
šân-e âbi

Fr.: jet bleu   

A transient optical phenomenon in the → stratosphere that emerges from the tops of → thunderstorm clouds at tremendous speeds. As their name implies, blue jets are optical ejections from the top of the electrically active core regions of thunderstorms. Following their emergence, they typically propagate upward in narrow cones at vertical speeds of roughly 100 km/s, fanning out and disappearing at heights of about 40-50 km. See also → sprite; → elve.

blue; → jet.

blue leak
  نشت ِ آبی   
našt-e âbi

Fr.: fuite bleue   

Leakage phenomenon in a filter, causing an unwanted response to the blue or green light.

blue; leak, from M.Du. leken "to drip, to leak," or from O.N. leka, cognate of O.E. leccan "to moisten," from P.Gmc. *lek- "deficiency" (cf. O.H.G. lecchen "to become dry," Ger. lechzen "to be parched with thirst").

Našt "leak," origin unknown; âbi, → blue.

blue loop
  گردال ِ آبی   
gerdâl-e âbi

Fr.: boucle bleue   

An evolutionary behavior of certain stars, particularly massive stars, which return to the blue stage after becoming a red supergiant. The phenomenon appears as a blueward loop on the theoretical evolutionary tracks.

blue; → loop.

Gerdâl, → loop, âbi, → blue.

blue Moon
  ماه ِ آبی   
mâh-e âbi

Fr.: lune bleue   

The second full moon in a calendar month. For a blue moon to occur, the first of the full moons must appear at or near the beginning of the month so that the second will fall within the same month. Full moons are separated by 29 days, while most months are 30 or 31 days long; so it is possible to fit two full moons in a single month. This happens every two and a half years, on average.

The folkloric term blue Moon for the calendrical event is new, and apparently goes back to the Maine Farmers' Almanac for 1937. But its original meaning in that work was the third full Moon in a season when there were four full Moons in that season. Some have related the term to the much older English expression moon is blue, which goes back to a couplet from 1528, interpreting it as "something that occurs rarely." However in that poem the expression had a meaning of "something that was absurd." Alternatively, the term blue Moon may have been borrowed from the Chinese lunar calendar particularly in its usage among American Chinese community. In fact in that calendar when there are two full Moons in a month they use the term "blue Moon" and add a thirteenth intercalary month. → blue; → moon.

<< < B r bac Bal Bar bar bea beh Bes bia Big bin bin bip Bla bla bli blu Boh Bon Bot bow bre bri bro bur > >>