An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 486
Bohr's postulate
  فراوس ِ بؤر   
farâvas-e Bohr

Fr.: postulat de Bohr   

One of the three postulates advanced in the → Bohr model which led to the correct prediction of the observed line spectrum of hydrogen atom. See also → Bohr's first postulate, → Bohr's second postulate, → Bohr's third postulate,

Bohr; → postulate.

Bohr's second postulate
  فراوس ِ دوم ِ بؤر   
farâvas-e dovom-e Bohr

Fr.: deuxième postulat de Bohr   

One of the postulates used in the → Bohr model, whereby when an atom is in the steady state an electron travelling in a circular orbit should have → quantized values of the → angular momentum which comply with the condition p = n(h/2π), where p is the angular momentum of the electron, h is → Planck's constant, and n is a positive integer called → quantum number.

Bohr; → second; → postulate.

Bohr's third postulate
  فراوس ِ سوم ِ بؤر   
farâvas-e sevom-e Bohr

Fr.: troisième postulat de Bohr   

One of the postulates used in the → Bohr model, whereby the atom emits (absorbs) a quantum of electromagnetic energy (→ photon) when the electron passes from an orbit with a greater (lesser) n value to one with a lesser (greater) value. The energy of the quantum is equal to the difference between the energies of the electron on its orbits before and after the transition or "jump": hν = ε1 - ε2, where h is the → Planck's constant and ν the frequency of the transition.

Bohr; → third; → postulate.

boiling point
  نقطه‌ی ِ جوش   
noqte-ye juš (#)

Fr.: point d'ébullition   

The temperature at which a liquid changes to a gas (vapor) at normal atmospheric pressure. In other words, the temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the external pressure.

M.E. boillen; O.Fr. boillir, from L. bullire "to bubble, seethe," from bulla "a bubble, knob;" → point.

Noqté, → point; juš "boiling," present stem of jušidan "to boil;" Khotanese jis- "to boil;" Av. yaēšiiant- "boiling;" cf. Skt. yas- "to boil, become hot," yasyati "boils, seethes;" Gk. zein "to bubble, boil, cook;" O.H.G. jesan "to ferment, foam;" Ger. Gischt "foam, froth," gären "to ferment;" O.E. gist; E. yeast.

Bok globule
  گویچه‌ی ِ بوک   
guyce-ye Bok

Fr.: globule de Bok   

A small, roughly spherical cloud of → interstellar dust and gas that appears as a dark compact globule when viewed against the background of an → H II region. Bok globules range in mass from about 1 to 1,000 or more → solar masses, and in size from about 10,000 → astronomical units to 3 → light-years. They typically have temperatures of around 10 → Kelvin. Bok globules are thought to represent a stage in the collapse of a dense fragment of → molecular clouds that are in the process of forming new stars. → elephant trunk.

In honor of Bart Jan Bok (1906-1983), the Dutch-American astronomer, who first observed these objects. In 1947, in collaboration with Edith F. Reilly, he put forward the hypothesis that these globules were undergoing → gravitational collapse to form new stars (Bok & Reilly, 1947, ApJ 105, 255); → globule.

bolide
  گرزین   
garzin

Fr.: bolide   

A → meteor which is extremely bright, particularly one that breaks up during its passage through the → atmosphere. Also called → fireball.

Bolide, Fr., from L. bolis, bolidis, from Gk. bolis, bolidos "missile, flash of lightning," from ballein "to throw;" PIE *gwelH1- "to throw;" → ballistics.

Garzin "arrow;" cf. Tâleši ger "meteor" (from Proto-Iranian *garH- "to throw"), cognate with Gk. ballein, as above; → ballistics.

bolometer
  تاوسنج   
tâvsanj

Fr.: bolomètre   

1) An instrument for measuring the intensity of radiant energy in amounts as small as one millionth of an erg. It uses the change in resistance of a thin conductor caused by the heating effect of the radiation. → actinometer, → photometer, → pyrheliometer, → pyrometer, radiometer.
2) In astronomy, an instrument that measures the amount of radiant energy received from a celestial object.

From Gk. bole "stroke, beam of light," from ballein "to throw" + middle suffix -o- + → -meter..

Tâvsanj, from tâv "light, brightness, heat, warmth" (from tâbidan "to radiate") + sanj, → -meter.

bolometric
  تاوسنجی، تاوسنجیک   
tâvsanji, tâvsanjik

Fr.: bolométrique   

Of or relating to or measured by a → bolometer.

bolometer; → -ic.

bolometric correction
  ارشایش ِ تاوسنجی، ~ تاوسنجیک   
aršâyeš-e tâvsanji, ~ tâvsanjik

Fr.: correction bolométrique   

The difference between the → visual magnitude and → bolometric magnitude.

bolometric; → correction.

bolometric luminosity
  تابندگی ِ تاوسنجی، ~ تاوسنجیک   
tâbandegi-ye tâvsanji, ~ tâvsanjik

Fr.: luminosité bolométrique   

The total rate of energy output of an object integrated over all wavelengths.

bolometric; → luminosity.

bolometric magnitude
  برز ِ تاوسنجی، ~ تاوسنجیک   
borz-e tâvsanji, ~ tâvsanjik

Fr.: magnitude bolométrique   

The magnitude of an astronomical object for the entire range of its electromagnetic spectrum.

bolometric; → magnitude.

Boltzmann constant
  پایای ِ بولتسمن   
pâyâ-ye Boltzmann

Fr.: constante de Boltzmann   

Boltzmann's constant.

Boltzmann's constant.

Boltzmann factor
  کروند ِ بولتسمن   
karvand-e Boltzmannn

Fr.: facteur de Boltzmann   

The factor e-E/kT involved in the probability for atoms having an excitation energy E and temperature T, where k is Boltzmann's constant.

Boltzmann's constant; → factor.

Boltzmann's constant
  پایای ِ بولتسمن   
pâyâ-ye Boltzmann

Fr.: constante de Boltzmann   

The physical constant, noted by k, relating the mean → kinetic energy of → molecules in an → ideal gas to their → absolute temperature. It is given by the ratio of the → gas constant to → Avogadro's number. Its value is about 1.380 x 10-16erg K-1.

Named after the Austrian physicist Ludwig Boltzmann (1844-1906), who made important contributions to the theory of statistical mechanics; → constant.

Boltzmann's entropy formula
  دیسول ِ درگاشت ِ بولتسمن   
disul-e dargâšt-e Boltzmann

Fr.: formule d'entropie de Boltzmann   

In → statistical thermodynamics, a probability equation relating the → entropy S of an → ideal gas to the quantity Ω, which is the number of → microstates corresponding to a given → macrostate: S = k. ln Ω. Same as → Boltzmann's relation.

Boltzmann's constant; → entropy; → formula.

Boltzmann's equation
  هموگش ِ بولتسمن   
hamugeš-e Boltzmann

Fr.: équation de Boltzmann   

1) An equation that expresses the relative number (per unit volume) of → excited atoms in different states as a function of the temperature for a gas in → thermal equilibrium: Nu/Nl = (gu/gl) exp (-ΔE/kTex), where Nu and Nl are the upper level and lower level populations respectively, gu and gl the → statistical weights, ΔE = hν the energy difference between the states, k is → Boltzmann's constant, and h  → Planck's constant.

Boltzmann's constant; → equation.

Boltzmann's relation
  باز‌آنش ِ بولتسمن   
bâzâneš-e Boltzmann

Fr.: relation de Boltzmann   

A relation between the → entropy of a given → state of a → thermodynamic system and the → probability of the state: S = k . ln Ω where S is the entropy of the system, k is → Boltzmann's constant, and Ω the thermodynamic probability of the state. Boltzmann's relation connects → statistical mechanics and → thermodynamics. Ω is the number of possible → microstates of the system, and it represents the → randomness of the system. The relation also describes the statistical meaning of the → second law of thermodynamics. This expression has been carved above Boltzmann's name on his tombstone in Zentralfreihof in Vienna. Same as → Boltzmann's entropy formula.

Boltzmann's constant; → relation.

bond
  بند   
band (#)

Fr.: lien   

The attractive force that holds together neighboring atoms in molecules.

Bond, variant of band, from M.E. bende, O.E. bend, from O.Fr. bande, bende, PIE *bendh- "to bind" (cf. Goth bandi "that which binds;" Av./O.Pers. band- "to bind, fetter," banda- "band, tie," Skt. bandh- "to bind, tie, fasten," bandhah "a tying, bandage").

Band "band, tie," from Mid.Pers., O.Pers./Av. band- "to bind," banda- "band, tie."

Bond albedo
  سپیدای ِ باند   
sepidâ-ye Bond

Fr.: albedo de Bond   

The fraction of the total amount of electromagnetic radiation falling upon a non-luminous spherical body that is reflected in all directions by that body. The bond albedo takes into account all wavelengths at all → phase angles. Compare with → geometric albedo.

Named after the American astronomer George Phillips Bond (1825-1865), who proposed it; → albedo.

Bondi-Hoyle accretion
  فربال ِ بوندی-هویل   
farbâl-e Bondi-Hoyle

Fr.: accrétion de Bondi-Hoyle   

The → accretion of mass by a star (assumed as point particle) moving at a steady speed through an infinite, uniform gas cloud. It is directly proportional to the star mass (M) and the medium density (ρ) and inversely proportional to the relative star/gas velocity (v). In its classical expression: 4πρ(G M)2 / v3, where G is the → gravitational constant. See Bondi & Hoyle (1944, MNRAS 104, 273) and Bondi (1952, MNRAS 112, 195). For a recent treatment of accretion in a turbulent medium see Krumholtz et al. 2006 (ApJ 638, 369).

Named after Hermann Bondi (1919-2005), an Anglo-Austrian mathematician and cosmologist and Fred Hoyle (1915-2001), British mathematician and astronomer best known as the foremost proponent and defender of the steady-state theory of the universe; → accretion.

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