An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 678
dwarf irregular galaxy
  کهکشان ِ بی‌سامان ِ کوتوله   
kahkašân-e bisâmân-e kutulé

Fr.: galaxie irrégulière naine   

An irregular galaxy that is much smaller than other irregulars. Dwarf irregulars are generally metal poor and have relatively high fractions of gas. They are thought to be similar to the earliest galaxies that populated the Universe, and are therefore important to understand the overall evolution of galaxies.

dwarf; → irregular; → galaxy.

dwarf nova
  نو‌اختر ِ کوتوله   
nowaxtar-e kutulé

Fr.: nova naine   

A class of → novae and → cataclysmic variables that have multiple observed → eruptions. Their prototype is → U Geminorum star. Optically, dwarf nova eruptions have amplitudes of 2-6 mag in V, a duration of a few to 20 days and a recurrence time-scale of weeks to years. Dwarf novae are thought to be → semidetached binary stars consisting of a → white dwarf  → primary accreting via → Roche lobe overflow from a → companion which is usually a → late-type, generally → main-sequence star. DN outbursts are usually attributed to the release of gravitational energy resulting from an → instability in the → accretion disk or by sudden mass transfers through the disk.

dwarf; → nova.

dwarf planet
  سیاره‌ی ِ کوتوله   
sayyâre-ye kutulé (#)

Fr.: planète naine   

A new category of → astronomical objects in the → solar system introduced in a resolution by the 26th General Assembly of the → International Astronomical Union (IAU) on August 24, 2006. The characterizing properties are as follows: 1) It is in orbit around the Sun; 2) It has sufficient mass for its self-gravity to overcome rigid body forces so that it assumes a → hydrostatic equilibrium (nearly round) shape; 3) It has not "cleared the neighbourhood" around its orbit; and 4) It is not a → satellite of a → planet, or other non-stellar body. The property 3 reclassified → Pluto from a planet to a dwarf planet because it has not cleared the neighborhood of its orbit (the → Kuiper Belt). The largest known dwarf planets are: → Eris, → Pluto, → Ceres, → Makemake, and → 2015 RR245.

dwarf; → planet.

dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph)
  کهکشان ِ کره‌وار ِ کوتوله   
kahkašân-e korevâr-e kutulé (#)

Fr.: galaxie sphéroïdale naine   

A subtype of dwarf ellipticals (→ dwarf elliptical galaxy), which are companion to the Milky Way and other similar galaxies. The first example of such objects was discovered by Harlow Shapley (1938) in the constellation → Sculptor. Nine such galaxies are known currently to orbit the Milky Way. Nearby galaxy clusters such as the Virgo, Fornax, Centaurus, and Coma clusters contain hundreds to thousands of individual dSph galaxies. These galaxies have very low surface brightnesses, as low as only 1% that of the night sky (faintest MV ~ -9). They are also among the smallest, least luminous galaxies known. Most of the radiation from dSph galaxies is emitted by stars in the optical portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The lack of strong emission lines, infrared, or radio radiation suggests that these galaxies are generally devoid of an → interstellar medium. The velocities of stars within dSph galaxies are so high that these galaxies must be disrupting. However, the bulk of mass in these galaxies might be undetected. Dynamical models that include → dark matter do adequately explain the → velocity dispersion of the stars in all dSph systems. In the most extreme cases, only 1% of the mass of the galaxy is visible. Many of the → Local Group dSph galaxies show evidence for star formation more recent than 10 Gyr.

dwarf; → spheroidal; → galaxy.

dwarf spiral galaxy
  کهکشان ِ مارپیچ ِ کوتوله   
kahkašân-e mârpic-e kutulé (#)

Fr.: galaxie spirale naine   

A galaxy that belongs to the spiral class but is significantly smaller.

dwarf; → spiral; → galaxy.

dwarf star
  ستاره‌ی ِ کوتوله   
setâre-ye kutulé (#)

Fr.: étoile naine   

A star that burns its hydrogen content to produce its energy and therefore belongs to the main-sequence luminosity class.

dwarf; → star.

dynamic
  توانیک   
tavânik

Fr.: dynamique   

1) Involving or relating to force related to motion.
2) Pertaining to the science of → dynamics.

From Fr. dynamique, from Ger. dynamisch, introduced by Leibnitz in 1691, from Gk. dynamikos "powerful," from dynamis "power," from dynasthai "be able to have power" + → -ic.

Tavânik, from tavân "power, strength," tavânestan "to be powerful, able," + Pers. suffix -ik; → -ics. The first component from Mid.Pers. tuwan "power, might," from O.Pers./Av. base tav- "to have power, to be strong, to be able," Av. tavah- "power," təviši- "strength," Mod.Pers. tuš, tâb "power, ability," O.Pers. tauman- "power, strength," tunuvant- "powerful," Skt. tu- "to be strong, to have authority," tavas-, tavisa- "strong, energetic," tavisi- "power, strength" + -ik-ic.

dynamic equilibrium
  ترازمندی ِ توانیک   
tarâzmandi-ye tavânik

Fr.: équilibre dynamique   

Mechanics: The condition of a moving mechanical system when the accelerating force is balanced by an imaginary kinetic reaction according to → d'Alembert's principle. See also → static equilibrium; → thermodynamic equilibrium.

Dynamic, adj. from → dynamics; → equilibrium.

dynamic oblateness
  پخی ِ توانیک   
paxi-ye tavânik

Fr.: aplatissement dynamique   

A measure of the extent to which mass has been shifted from the polar regions of a (spinning) body toward its equator (Ellis et al., 2007, Planetary Ring Systems, Springer).

dynamic; → oblateness.

dynamic pressure
  فشار ِ توانیک   
fešâr-e tavânik

Fr.: pression dynamique   

A property of a moving → fluid defined by (1/2)ρv2 in → Bernoulli's law, where ρ is → density of fluid and v is → velocity. Dynamic pressure is the difference between → total pressure and → static pressure. Also called → velocity pressure. → ram pressure.

dynamic; → pressure.

dynamic range
  برد ِ توانیک   
bord-e tavânik

Fr.: dynamique   

The ratio of the maximum to minimum signal levels present in an image. For instance, a true 12-bit digital camera is capable of providing a dynamic range of 4096 to 1.

Adj. of → dynamics; → range.

dynamic viscosity
  وشکسانی ِ توانیک   
vošksâni-y tavânik

Fr.: viscosité dynamique   

Same as → viscosity and → absolute viscosity.

dynamic; → viscosity.

dynamical
  توانیک   
tavânik

Fr.: dynamique   

Of or pertaining to force or power; of or pertaining to force related to motion.
Pertaining to the science of dynamics. Same as dynamic.

Adj. from → dynamics.

dynamical age
  سن ِ توانیک   
senn-e tavânik

Fr.: âge dynamique   

Age based on dynamical properties of a system. For example, the time derived for a system to evolve from an initial state to its present state, based on velocity and dimension (size) measurements.

dynamical; → age.

dynamical disruption
  گسیخت ِ توانیک   
gosixt-e tavânik

Fr.: rupture dynamique   

The process whereby a → bound system, such as a → binary system or a → globular cluster, is broken apart.

dynamical; → disruption.

dynamical equilibrium
  ترازمندی ِ توانیک   
tarâzmandi-ye tavânik

Fr.: équilibre dynamique   

Of a physical system, a condition in which the parts of the system are in continuous motion, but they move in opposing directions at equal rates so that the system as a whole remains in equilibrium.

dynamical; → equilibrium.

dynamical friction
  مالش ِ توانیک   
mâleš-e tavânik

Fr.: frottement dynamique   

The gravitational interaction between a relatively massive body and a field of much less massive bodies through which the massive body travels. As a result, the moving body loses → momentum and → kinetic energy. An example of dynamical friction is the sinking of massive stars to the center of a → star cluster, a process called → mass segregation. Dynamical friction plays an important role in → stellar dynamics. It was first quantified by Chandrasekhar (1943).

dynamical; → friction.

dynamical law
  قانون ِ توانیک   
qânun-e tavânik

Fr.: loi dynamique   

A law that describes the motion of individual particles in a system, in contrast to → statistical laws.

dynamical; → law.

dynamical mass
  جرم ِ توانیک   
jerm-e tavânik

Fr.: masse dynamique   

The mass of an object derived indirectly from theoretical formulae based on the laws governing the behavior of a → dynamical system.

dynamical; → mass.

dynamical parallax
  دیدگشت ِ توانیک   
didgašt-e tavânik

Fr.: parallaxe dynamique   

A method for deriving the distance to a binary star. The angular diameter of the orbit of the stars around each other and their apparent brightness are observed. By applying Kepler's laws and the mass-luminosity relation, the distance of the binary star can be calculated.

dynamical; → parallax.

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