An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 403
graze
  برمژیدن   
barmažidan (#)

Fr.: raser, frôler, effleurer   

To touch or rub lightly in passing.

Perhaps special use of graze "to feed on grass," from M.E. grasen, O.E. grasian.

Barmažidan, from Choresmian parmž "to touch, to rub," variants barmajidan, majidan, parmâsidan, Mid.Pers. pahrmâh- "to touch, to feel;" ultimately from Proto-Ir. *pari-mars-, from *Hmars-, *Hmarz- "to touch, rub, wipe;" probably related to marz "border, frontier," mâlidan "to rub, polish."

grazer
  برمژنده   
barmžandé

Fr.: rasant   

A thing that grazes.

Agent noun of → graze.

grazing
  ۱) برمژنده؛ ۲) برمژ   
1) barmažandé; 2) barmaž

Fr.: 1) rasant; 2) rasage, frôlement, effleurement   

1) Describing something that grazes. → grazing angle, → grazing occultation.
2) The act of touching or rubbing lightly in passing.

graze; → -ing.

grazing incidence
  فتاد ِ برمژنده   
fotâd-e barmažandé

Fr.: incidence rasante   

Light striking a surface at an angle almost perpendicular to the normal.

grazing; → incidence.

grazing occultation
  فروپوشانش ِ برمژنده   
forupušâneš-e barmažandé

Fr.: occultation rasante   

A special type of occultation that occurs when the star appears to pass tangentially on the → edge of the → Moon.

grazing; → occultation.

grazing-incidence telescope
  تلسکوپ با فتاد ِ برمژنده   
teleskop bâ fotâd-e barmažandé

Fr.: télescope à incidence rasante   

A telescope design used for focusing → extreme ultraviolet, → X-rays, and → gamma rays. Such short wavelengths do not reflect in the same manner as at the large incidence angles employed in optical and radio telescopes. Instead, they are mostly absorbed. To bring X-rays to a → focus, one has to use a different approach from → Cassegrain or other typical → reflecting telescopes. In a grazing-incidence telescope, incoming light is almost → parallel to the → mirror surface and strikes the mirror → surface at a very → shallow angle. Much like skipping a stone on the water by throwing it at a low angle to the surface, X-rays may be → deflected by mirrors arranged at low incidence angles to the incoming energy. Several designs of grazing-incidence mirrors have been used in various → X-ray telescopes, including → plane mirrors or combinations of → parabolic and → hyperbolic surfaces. To increase the collecting area a number of mirror elements are often nested inside one another. For example, the → Chandra X-ray Observatory uses two sets of four nested grazing-incidence mirrors to bring X-ray photons to focus onto two → detector instruments. → Bragg's law; → X-ray astronomy.

grazing incidence; → telescope.

great
  بزرگ   
bozorg (#)

Fr.: grand   

Unusual or considerable in degree, power, intensity, number, etc.

O.E. great "big, coarse, stout," from W.Gmc. *grautaz (cf. Du. groot, Ger. groß "great").

Bozorg "great, large, immense, grand, magnificient;" Mid.Pers. vazurg "great, big, high, lofty;" O.Pers. vazarka- "great;" Av. vazra- "club, mace" (Mod.Pers. gorz "mace"); cf. Skt. vájra- "(Indra's) thunderbolt," vaja- "strength, speed;" L. vigere "be lively, thrive," velox "fast, lively," vegere "to enliven," vigil "watchful, awake;" P.Gmc. *waken (Du. waken; O.H.G. wahhen; Ger. wachen "to be awake;" E. wake); PIE base *weg- "to be strong, be lively."

Great Attractor
  درکشنده‌ی ِ بزرگ   
darkašande-ye bozorg

Fr.: Grand Attracteur   

A hypothesized large concentration of mass (about 1016  → solar masses), some hundred million → light-years from Earth, in the direction of the → Centaurus → supercluster, that seems to be affecting the motions of many nearby galaxies by virtue of its gravity.

great; → attractor.

great circle
  پرهون ِ بزرگ، دایره‌ی ِ ~   
parhun-e bozorg, dâyere-ye ~

Fr.: grand cercle   

A circle on a sphere whose plane passes through the center of the sphere.

great; → circle.

Great Red Spot
  لکه‌ی ِ سرخ ِ بزرگ   
lakke-ye sorx-e bozorg (#)

Fr.: Grande tache rouge   

An anticyclonic storm on the planet Jupiter akin to a hurricane on Earth, but it is enormous (three Earths would fit within its boundaries) and it has persisted for at least the 400 years that humans have observed it through telescopes.

great; → red; → spot.

Great Rift
  چاک ِ بزرگ   
câk-e bozorg

Fr.:   

An apparent fissure in the bright clouds of the Milky Way between → Cygnus and → Sagittarius caused by a series of large, dark, overlapping clouds.

great; → rift.

greatest eastern elongation
  بزرگترین درازش ِ خاوری   
bozorgtarin derâzeš-e xâvari

Fr.: plus grande élongation est   

The Greatest → elongation of an inferior planet occurring after sunset.

Superlative of → great; → eastern; → elongation.

greatest eclipse
  بزرگترین خورگرفت   
bozogtarin xorgereft

Fr.: la plus grande éclipse   

The instant when the axis of the Moon's → shadow cone passes closest to Earth's center. For → total eclipses, the instant of greatest eclipse is virtually identical to the instants of greatest magnitude and greatest duration. However, for → annular eclipses, the instant of greatest duration may occur at either the time of greatest eclipse or near the sunrise and sunset points of the eclipse path (F. Espenak, NASA).

Superlative of → great; → eclipse.

greatest western elongation
  بزرگترین درازش ِ باختری   
bozorgtarin derâzeš-e bâxtari

Fr.: plus grande élongation ouest   

The Greatest → elongation of an inferior planet occurring before sunrise.

Superlative of → great; → western; → elongation.

Greek numeral system
  راژمان ِ عددهای ِ یونانی   
râžmân-e adadhâ-ye Yunâni

Fr.: numération grecque   

A → numeral system in which letters represent numbers. In an earlier system, called acrophonic, the symbols for numerals came from the first letter of the number name. Subsequently, the numerals were based on giving values to the letters of alphabet. For example α, β, γ, and δ represented 1, 2, 3, and 4; while ι, κ, λ, and μ stood for 10, 20, 30, and 40, and ρ, σ, τ, and υ for 100, 200, 300, and 400. The Greek also used the additive principle. For example 11, 12, 13, 14, and 374 were written ια, ιβ, ιγ, ιδ, and τοδ. The numbers between 1000 and 9000 were expressed by adding a subscript or superscript ι (iota) to the symbols for 1 to 9. For example ιA and ιΘ for 1000 and 9000. Numbers greater than 9999 were expressed using M, which was the myriad, 10,000. Therefore, since 123 was represented by ρκγ, 123,000 was written as Mρκγ.

numeral; → system.

green
  سبز   
sabz (#)

Fr.: vert   

A color intermediate in the spectrum between yellow and blue (wavelength between 5000 and 5700 Å). The color of most grasses and leaves while growing.

Green, from O.E. grene, related to growan "to grow," from W.Gmc. *gronja- (cf. Dan. grøn, Du. groen, Ger. grün), from PIE base *gro- "to grow."

Sabz "green," from Mid.Pers. sabz "green, fresh," related to sabzi "grass."

green flash
  درخش ِ سبز   
deraxš-e sabz (#)

Fr.: rayon vert   

A brilliant green color that occasionally appears on the upper limb of the Sun as it rises or sets.

green; → flash.

green pea galaxy
  کهکشان ِ نخود سبز   
kahkešân-e noxod sabz

Fr.: galaxie petit pois   

A member of a class of galaxies of relatively small size having very strong emission lines especially [O iii] 5007 Å and an unusually large → equivalent width of up to 1000 Å. They were first noted because of their peculiar bright green color and small size, unresolved in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging. Most of the green pea galaxies are low-mass galaxies (M ~ 108.5 to 1010solar masses), with high → star formation rates (~ 10 solar masses per year), solar → metallicities, and → redshifts ranging from z = 0.112 to 0.360 (See Cardamone et al. 2009, MNRAS 399, 1191; Izotov et al. 2010, astro-ph/1012.5639).

Such called because of their appearance and green color (mainly due to very strong optical emission line [O iii] 5007 Å) in composite images; → green; pea, from M.E. pease; → galaxy.

Kahkešân, → galaxy; noxod "chick-pea," Mid.Pers. naxôd (Laki noxa, Kurd. nuk); sabz, → green.

greenhouse
  گرمخانه   
garmxâné (#)

Fr.: serre   

A building with transparent walls and roof, usually of glass, for the cultivation and exhibition of plants under controlled conditions (Dictionary.com).

green; → house.

Garmxâné, literally "warm house," from garm, → warm, + xâné, → house.

greenhouse effect
  اُسکر ِ گرمخانه   
oskar-e garmxâné

Fr.: effet de serre   

An increase in → temperature caused when incoming → solar radiation is passed but outgoing → thermal radiation is trapped by the → atmosphere. The major factors for this effect are → carbon dioxide and → water vapor. The greenhouse effect is very important on Venus and Earth but very weak on Mars. On average, about one third of the solar radiation that hits the Earth is reflected back to space. The Earth's surface becomes warm and emits → infrared radiation. The → greenhouse gases trap the infrared radiation, thus warming the atmosphere. Without the greenhouse effect the Earth's average global temperature would be -18° Celsius, rather than the present 15° Celsius. However, human activities are causing greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere to increase.

greenhouse; → effect.

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