An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 26 Search : giant
asymptotic giant branch (AGB)
  شاخه‌ی ِ ناهمساوی ِ غولان   
šâxe-ye nâhamsâvi-ye qulân

Fr.: branche asymptotique des géantes   

A region of the → Hertzsprung-Russell diagram populated by evolving → low-mass to → intermediate-mass stars. These stars have an electron → degenerate core of carbon and oxygen surrounded by two burning shells of helium and hydrogen. The H and He-burning shells are activated alternately in the deep layers of the star. An extended and tenuous convection envelope, having a radius of 104-105 times the size of the core, lies above these shells. The loosely bound envelope is gradually eroded by the strong → stellar wind, which forms a dusty → circumstellar envelope out to several hundreds of stellar radii. The convective envelope, stellar atmosphere, and circumstellar envelope have a rich and changing chemical composition provided by → nucleosynthesis processes in the burning shells in the deep interior.

symptotic; → giant; → branch.

blue giant
  غول ِ آبی   
qul-e âbi

Fr.: géante bleue   

A giant star with spectral type O or B.

blue; → giant.

Qul, → giant; âbi, → blue.

blue supergiant
  ابرغول ِ آبی   
abarqul-e âbi

Fr.: supergéante bleue   

An evolved star of spectral type O, B, or A; e.g. → Rigel, → Deneb.

blue; → supergiant.

bright giant
  غول ِ تابناک   
qul-e tâbnâk

Fr.: géante lumineuse   

An → evolved star which is more → luminous than normal → giant stars (→ luminosity class III) and between ordinary giants and → supergiants (class I). It is denoted by the symbol II. Examples are → Canopus and → Adhara.

bright; → giant.

cool hypergiant
  هیپرغول ِ سرد   
hiperqul-e sard

Fr.: hypergéante froide   

A highly unstable, → very massive star lying just below the empirical upper luminosity boundary in the → H-R diagram (→ Humphreys-Davidson limit) with spectral types ranging from late A to M. Cool hypergiants very likely represent a very short-lived evolutionary stage, and are distinguished by their high → mass loss rates. Many of them also show photometric and spectroscopic variability, and some have large → infrared excesses and extensive circumstellar ejecta. The evolutionary state of most of these stars is not known but they are all → post-main-sequence stars (Humphreys, 2008, IAUS 250).

cool; → hypergiant.

gas giant
  غولپیکر ِ گازی   
qulpeykar-e gâzi (#)

Fr.: géante gazeuse   

A → giant planet composed mainly of → hydrogen and → helium with → traces of → water, → methane, → ammonia, and other hydrogen compounds. Gas giants have a small rocky or metallic core. The core would be at high temperatures (as high as 20,000 K) and extreme pressures. There are four gas giants in our solar system: → Jupiter, → Saturn, → Uranus, and → Neptune. Another category of gas giants is → ice giants. Ice giants are also composed of small amounts of hydrogen and helium. However, they have high levels of what are called "ices." These ices include methane, water, and ammonia.

gas; → giant.

giant
  غول، غولپیکر، کلان   
qul, qulpeykar, kalân (#)

Fr.: géant   

A person or thing of unusually great size, power, importance. In astronomy, e.g. → giant star, → giant branch, → red giant.

From O.Fr. géant, from V.L. *gagantem, from L. gigas "giant," from Gk. gigas (gen. gigantos), huge and savage monsters, children of Gaia and Uranus, who fought the Olympians but were eventually destroyed by the gods, probably from a pre-Gk. language. The Gk. word was used in Septuagint (the Greek translation of the Jewish Scriptures) to refer to men of great size and strength, hence the expanded use in Western languages.

Qul "an imaginary hideous demon, supposed to devour men and animals," Pers. word probably related to Skt. grábha- "a demon causing diseases, one who seizes," grahila- "possessed by a demon," from grah-, grabh- "to seize, take," graha "seizing, holding, perceiving," Av./O.Pers. grab- "to take, seize;" Mid.Pers. griftan; Mod.Pers. gereftan "to take, seize;" cf. M.L.G. grabben "to grab," from P.Gmc. *grab, E. grab "to take or grasp suddenly;" PIE base *ghrebh- "to seize."
Qulpeykar, from qul, as explained, + peykar "figure, form, body" (from Mid.Pers. pahikar "picture, image;" from O.Pers. patikara- "picture, (sculpted) likeness," from patiy "against" (Av. paiti; Skt. prati; Gk. poti/proti + kara- "doer, maker," from kar- "to do, make, build;" Av. kar-; Skt. kr-; cf. Skt. pratikrti- "an image, likeness, model; counterpart").
Kalân "great, large, big, bulky."

giant branch
  شاخه‌ی ِ غولان، ~ غولپیکران   
šâxe-ye qulân, ~ qulpeykarân (#)

Fr.: branche des géantes   

A conspicuous family of stars in the → Hertzsprung-Russell diagram composed of red, evolved stars with large sizes. → giant star; → red giant.

giant; → branch.

giant H II region
  ناحیه‌ی ِ II H یِ غولپیکر   
nahiye-ye H II-ye qulpeykar

Fr.: région H II géante   

An → H II region emitting at least 1050 → Lyman continuum photons per second, or about 10 times → Orion nebula. Such an H II region should be powered by at least one O3V star or by at least a dozen → O-type and tens → B-type stars. Our nearest giant H II region is → NGC 3603. Some other Galactic giant H II regions are: → Lagoon Nebula, M17, W31, W51A, and NGC 3576.

giant; → H II; → region.

giant magnetoresistance (GMR)
  مغنات-ایستادگی ِ کلان، ایستادگی ِ مغناتیسی ِ ~   
meqnât-istâdegi-ye kalân, istâdegi-ye meqnâtisi-ye ~

Fr.: magnétorésistance géante   

A quantum mechanical phenomenon where the resistance of certain materials drops dramatically upon application of a magnetic field in certain structures composed of alternating layers of magnetic and nonmagnetic metals. The basis of the GMR is the dependence of the electrical resistivity of electrons in a magnetic metal on the direction of the electron spin, either parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic moment of the layers. The 2007 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to the French physicist Albert Fert (1938-) and German physicist Peter Grünberg (1939-) for the discovery of GMR.

giant; magneto- combining form of → magnet; → resistance.

giant molecular cloud (GMC)
  ابر ِ مولکولی ِ غولپیکر   
abr-e molekuli-ye qulpeykar (#)

Fr.: nuage moléculaire géant   

A massive complex of → interstellar gas and → dust, consisting mostly of → molecular hydrogen, that typically stretches over 150 light-years and contains several hundred thousand → solar masses. Giant molecular clouds are the principal sites of star formation. → molecular cloud.

giant; → molecular; → cloud.

giant planet
  سیاره‌ی ِ غولپیکر   
sayyâre-ye qulpeykar (#)

Fr.: planète géante   

A planet much more massive than Earth. The solar system has four giant planets: → Jupiter, → Saturn, → Uranus, and → Neptune.

giant; → planet.

giant star
  ستاره‌ی ِ غولپیکر   
setâre-ye qulpeykar (#)

Fr.: étoile géante   

A high-luminosity star that has evolved off the → main sequence and lies above the main sequence on the → Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. A member of the → giant branch. → red giant.

giant; → planet.

hypergiant star
  ستاره‌ی ِ هیپرغول   
setâre-ye hiperqul

Fr.: hypergéante   

A high luminosity star with absolute visual magnitude around -10, about 106 times as luminous as the Sun. Hypergiant stars are evolved → massive stars belonging to the luminosity class Ia+ or Ia0. Their spectra show very broadened emission and absorption lines resulting from the high luminosity and low surface gravity which favor strong → stellar wind. See also → Humphreys-Davidson limit; → yellow hypergiant.

hyper-; → giant.

ice giant
  غولپیکر ِ یخی   
qulpeykar-e yaxi

Fr.: géante de glace   

A member of the lesser mass group of → gas giants. Ice giants contain a higher quantity of materials that form ices at low temperatures, such as → water, → methane, and → ammonia. There are two ice giants in the Solar System, → Uranus and → Neptune.

ice; → giant.

post-asymptotic giant branch star (post-AGB)
  ستاره‌ی ِ پسا-شاخه‌ی ِ غولان ِ ناهمساوی   
setâre-ye pasâ-šâxe-ye qulân-e nâhamsâvi

Fr.: étoile post-asymptotique   

A star in a short-lived evolutionary stage evolving from the → asymptotic giant branch toward higher → effective temperatures. The majority of low and intermediate mass stars (1 to 8 → solar masses) are believed to pass through this stage on their way to becoming → planetary nebulae.

post-; → asymptotic giant branch.

red giant
  غول ِ سرخ، غولپیکر ِ ~   
qul-e sorx (#), qulpeykar-e ~ (#)

Fr.: géante rouge   

A certain star of spectral type K or later that occupies the upper right portion of the → H-R diagram. Red giants are evolved stars that have exhausted their hydrogen fuel in the core. They may have a → luminosity up to 1000 times greater than → main sequence stars of the same → spectral type. Red giants belong to the → luminosity class III or II (bright giants). They are luminous because of their great size, but have a relatively low surface temperature. All normal stars are expected to pass eventually through a red-giant phase as a consequence of stellar evolution. When a main sequence star has converted approximately 10% of its hydrogen to helium, nuclear reactions in the core stop (→ Schönberg-Chandrasekhar limit). The → hydrostatic equilibrium is no longer maintained, and the core contracts while the outer layers expand and cool. This process produces the low surface temperature and large size (from 10 to 100 times that of the Sun) that characterize the red giant. In the core the temperature continues to rise. When it approaches 100,000,000 K helium will begin to fuse into carbon. → helium flash. Prominent bright red giants in the night sky include → Aldebaran and → Arcturus.

red; → giant.

red giant branch (RGB)
  شاخه‌ی ِ غولان ِ سرخ   
šâxe-ye qulân-e sorx

Fr.: branche des géantes rouges   

The evolutionary path of a star that has exhausted its available hydrogen content in the core, between the → main-sequence turnoff and the → helium flash.

red giant; → branch.

red supergiant
  ابَرغول ِ سرخ   
abarqul-e sorx (#)

Fr.: supergéante rouge   

A supergiant star with spectral type K or M. Red supergiants are the largest stars in the Universe, but not necessarily the most massive. Betelgeuse and Antares are the best known examples of a red supergiant.

red; → supergiant.

subgiant
  زیر-غول   
zir-qul

Fr.: sous-géante   

A star with a lower absolute magnitude than a normal giant star of its → spectral type. It is a star that has exhausted the hydrogen at its center and is evolving into a → red giant. Subgiants are luminosity class IV.

sub-; → giant.

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