An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 86 Search : action
Coulomb interaction
  اندرژیرش ِ کولن   
andaržireš-e Coulomb

Fr.: interaction de Coulomb   

The reciprocal force between two or more → charged particles according to → Coulomb's law.

coulomb; → interaction.

decimal fraction
  برخه‌ی ِ دهدهی   
barxe-ye dahdahi

Fr.: fraction décimale   

A fraction expressed by using → decimal representation, as opposed to a vulgar fraction. For example, 2/5 is a vulgar fraction; 0.40 is a decimal fraction.

decimal; → fraction.

deuterium fractionation
  برخانش ِ دوتریوم   
barxâneš-e doteriom

Fr.: fractionnement de deutérium   

The difference between the deuterium (D)/hydrogen (H) → abundance → ratio in an object with respect to that representing a standard or mean value for that type of objects. Same as → isotope fractionation of deuterium. In the gas phase chemistry many of the D fractionation reactions produce an excess of D atoms relative to → hydrogen atoms. Deuterium fractionation in → interstellar cloud cores, → protostars, and → Solar System bodies is frequently used to infer important aspects of their physical and chemical histories. For example, the → deuterium enhancement in the Earth's sea water, with respect to the cosmic abundance, has been interpreted as being due to → enrichment by → comet-like → planetesimals colliding with the young Earth.

deuterium; → fractionation.

differential refraction
  شکست ِ دگرسانه‌ای   
šekast-e dagarsâneyi

Fr.: refraction différentielle   

A problem encountered in astronomical spectroscopy, which consists of a loss of light from some wavelengths due to → atmospheric dispersion. In simple terms, differential refraction means that at nonzero → zenith distances an object cannot be simultaneously placed at the same position within a → slit at all wavelengths. This problem becomes more important for increasing → airmass, larger → spectral range, and smaller → slitwidths. To remedy this drawback, the slit should always be oriented along a direction perpendicular to the horizon, since differential refraction occurs in that direction.

differential; → refraction.

diffraction
  پراش   
parâš (#)

Fr.: diffraction   

A wave property of light which allows it to curl around obstacles whose size is about that of the wavelength of the light. As a → wavefront of light passes by an opaque edge or through an opening, secondary weaker wavefronts are generated, apparently originating at that edge. These secondary wavefronts will interfere with the primary wavefront as well as with each other to form a → diffraction pattern.
Related terms: → diffusion; → dispersion; → distribution; → scatter; → scattering.

From Fr. diffraction, from Mod.L. diffractionem, from L. diffrac-, stem of diffringere "break in pieces," from → dis- "apart" + frangere "to break."

Parâš "dispersion, scattering," variant of pâš, pâšidan, → dispersion.

diffraction grating
  توری ِ پراش   
turi-ye parâš (#)

Fr.: réseau de diffraction   

An optical device containing thousands of very fine parallel grooves which produce interference patterns in a way which separates out all the components of the light into a spectrum.

diffraction; → grating.

diffraction pattern
  الگوی ِ پراش   
olgu-ye parâš (#)

Fr.: tache de diffraction   

A series of concentric rings of dark and light color produced by interference.

diffraction; → pattern.

Olgu, loanword from Turkish; parâšdiffraction.

diffraction spike
  سیخک ِ پراش   
sixak-e parâš

Fr.: aigrette de diffraction   

One of several light rays emanating from a bright light source in images taken with → reflecting telescopes. They are artifacts caused by light diffracting around the support or → spider vanes of the → secondary mirror.

diffraction; → spike.

diffraction-limited
  کران‌مند به پراش   
karânmand bé parâš

Fr.: limité par la diffraction   

The quality of an → optical system that is capable of producing images with angular resolution as small as the theoretical limit of the → Airy disk.

diffraction; limited, adj. of → limit.

Karânmand "bounded, limited," from karânboundary + -mand possession suffix; parâš diffraction.

double refraction
  شکست ِ دوتایی   
šekast-e dotâyi

Fr.: double réfraction   

Formation of two refracted rays of light from a single incident ray; property of certain crystals, notably calcite.

double; → refraction.

Einstein-Hilbert action
  ژیرش ِ اینشتین-هیلبرت   
žireš-e Einstein-Hilbert

Fr.: action de Einstein-Hilbert   

In → general relativity, the → action that yields → Einstein's field equations. It is expressed by:
SEH = (1/2κ)∫d4x (-g)1/2R + Sm,
where κ ≡ 8πG and Sm is the matter part of the action.

Einstein; → Hilbert space; → action.

electron diffraction
  پراش ِ الکترونی   
parâš-e elekroni (#)

Fr.: diffraction des électrons   

A diffraction phenomenon resulting from the passage of electrons through matter, analogous to the diffraction of visible light. This phenomenon is the main evidence for the existence of waves associated with elementary particles; → de Broglie wavelength.

electron; → diffraction.

electroweak interaction
  اندرژیرش ِ برقانزار   
andaržireš-e barqânezâr

Fr.: interaction électrofaible   

The unified description of two of the four fundamental interactions of nature, → electromagnetism and the → weak interaction which would merge into a single force under conditions of extreme temperature (above 1016 degrees, 102 GeV) prevalent in the early history of the → Universe.

electroweak; → interaction.

Fermi interaction
  اندرژیرش ِ فرمی   
andaržirš-e Fermi

Fr.: interaction de Fermi   

An old explanation, proposed by Enrico Fermi, of the → weak interaction.

fermi; → interaction.

fraction
  برخه   
barxé (#)

Fr.: fraction   

A rational number of the form a/b where a is called the numerator and b is called the denominator.

From L.L. fractionem (nom. fractio) "a breaking in pieces," from frangere "to break," from PIE base *bhreg- "to break" (cf. Goth. brikan, O.E. brecan "to break;" Lith. brasketi "crash, crack").

Barxé, from barx "lot, portion," variant bahr, from Mid.Pers. bahr "lot, share, portion," Av. baxəδra- "portion."

fractional
  برخه‌ای   
barxe-yi

Fr.: fractionnaire, fractionné, partiel   

1) Math.: Pertaining to fractions; constituting a fraction.
2) Chemistry: Of or relating to any process by which parts of a mixture are separated by exploiting differences in their physical properties, such as their boiling points, solubility, or other characteristics.

fraction; → -al.

fractional sky coverage
  پوشش ِ برخه‌ای ِ آسمان   
pušeš-e barxe-yi-ye âsmân

Fr.: couverture partielle du ciel   

The portion of the 4π → steradians of the sky that a radiotelescope can observe from a given location on Earth over a 24-hour time interval.

fractional; → sky; → coverage.

fractionate
  برخاندن   
barxândan

Fr.: fractionner   

1) To break something up into smaller parts.
2) To separate a mixture into ingredients or portions having different properties, as by distillation or otherwise.

From → fraction + -ate a suffix forming verbs or nouns, from L. -atus, -ata, -atum.

Barxândan, from barx, barxé, → fraction, + -ândan suffix of transitive verbs.

fractionation
  برخانش   
barxâneš

Fr.: fractionnement   

1) Any of various methods of separating the components of a mixture into fractions of different properties.
2) → isotope fractionation

Verbal noun from → fractionate.

Fresnel diffraction
  پراش ِ فرنل   
parâš-e Fresnel (#)

Fr.: diffraction de Fresnel   

The diffraction effects obtained when either the source of light or observing screen, or both, are at a finite distance from diffracting aperture or obstacle. → Fraunhofer diffraction.

Named after Jean Augustin Fresnel (1788-1827), French physicist, a key figure in establishing the wave theory of light. His earlier work on interference was carried out in ignorance of that of Thomas Young (1773-1829), English physician and physicist, but later they corresponded and were allies; → diffraction.

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