An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 232 Search : era
generalized
  هروینیده   
harvinidé

Fr.: généralisé   

Made general. → generalized coordinates; → generalized velocities.

P.p. of → generalize

generalized coordinates
  هماراهای ِ هروینیده   
hamârâhâ-ye harvinidé

Fr.: coordonnées généralisées   

In a material system, the independent parameters which completely specify the configuration of the system, i.e. the position of its particles with respect to the frame of reference. Usually each coordinate is designated by the letter q with a numerical subscript. A set of generalized coordinates would be written as q1, q2, ..., qn. Thus a particle moving in a plane may be described by two coordinates q1, q2, which may in special cases be the → Cartesian coordinates x, y, or the → polar coordinates r, θ, or any other suitable pair of coordinates. A particle moving in a space is located by three coordinates, which may be Cartesian coordinates x, y, z, or → spherical coordinates r, θ, φ, or in general q1, q2, q3. The generalized coordinates are normally a "minimal set" of coordinates. For example, in Cartesian coordinates the simple pendulum requires two coordinates (x and y), but in polar coordinates only one coordinate (θ) is required. So θ is the appropriate generalized coordinate for the pendulum problem.

generalized; → coordinate.

generalized forces
  نیروهای ِ هروینیده   
niruhâ-ye harvinidé

Fr.: forces généralisées   

In → Lagrangian dynamics, forces related to → generalized coordinates. For any system with n generalized coordinates qi (i = 1, ..., n), generalized forces are expressed by Fi = ∂L/∂qi, where L is the → Lagrangian function.

generalized; → force.

generalized momenta
  جنباک‌های ِ هروینیده   
jonbâkhâ-ye harvinidé

Fr.: quantité de mouvement généralisée   

In → Lagrangian dynamics, momenta related to → generalized coordinates. For any system with n generalized coordinates qi (i = 1, ..., n), generalized momenta are expressed by pi = ∂L/∂q.i, where L is the → Lagrangian function.

generalized; → momentum.

generalized velocities
  تنداهای ِ هروینیده   
tondâhâ-ye harvinidé

Fr.: vitesses généralisées   

The time → derivatives of the → generalized coordinates of a system.

generalized; → velocity.

generate
  آزانیدن   
âzânidan

Fr.: générer   

To bring into existence; create; produce.
Math.: To trace (a figure) by the motion of a point, straight line, or curve.

Generate, from M.E., from L. generatus "produce," p.p. of generare "to bring forth," from gener-, genus "descent, birth," akin to Pers. zâdan, Av. zan- "to give birth," as explained below.

Âzânidan, from â- nuance/strengthening prefix + zân, from Av. zan- "to bear, give birth to a child, be born," infinitive zazāite, zāta- "born;" Mod.Pers. zâdan, present stem zā- "to bring forth, give birth" (Mid.Pers. zâtan; cf. Skt. jan- "to produce, create; to be born," janati "begets, bears;" Gk. gignomai "to happen, become, be born;" L. gignere "to beget;" PIE base *gen- "to give birth, beget") + -idan infinitive suffix.

generation
  آزانش   
âzâneš

Fr.: génération   

1) A coming into being.
2) The → production of → energy (→ heat or → electricity).

Verbal noun of → generate.

generative
  آزاننده، آزانشی   
âzânandé, âzâneši

Fr.: génératif   

1) Capable of producing or creating.
2) Pertaining to the production of offspring.

generate; → -ive.

generator
  آزانگر   
âzângar

Fr.: générateur   

1) A machine for converting one form of energy into another.
2) Geometry: That which creates a line, a surface, a solid by its motion.

From L. generator "producer," from genera(re)generate + -tor a suffix forming personal agent nouns from verbs and, less commonly, from nouns.

Âzângar, from âzân the stem of âzânidangenerate + -gar suffix of agent nouns, from kar-, kardan "to do, to make" (Mid.Pers. kardan; O.Pers./Av. kar- "to do, make, build," Av. kərənaoiti "makes;" cf. Skt. kr- "to do, to make," krnoti "makes," karma "act, deed;" PIE base kwer- "to do, to make").

gravitational acceleration
  شتاب ِ گرانشی   
šetâb-e gerâneši (#)

Fr.: accélération gravitationnelle   

The acceleration caused by the force of gravity. At the Earth's surface it is determined by the distance of the object form the center of the Earth: g = GM/R2, where G is the → gravitational constant, and M and R are the Earth's mass and radius respectively. It is approximately equal to 9.8 m s-2. The value varies slightly with latitude and elevation. Also known as the → acceleration of gravity.

gravitational; → acceleration.

gravitational interaction
  اندرژیرش ِ گرانشی   
andaržireš-e gerâneši

Fr.: interaction gravitationnelle   

Mutual attraction between any two bodies that have mass.

gravitational; → interaction.

Greek numeral system
  راژمان ِ عددهای ِ یونانی   
râžmân-e adadhâ-ye Yunâni

Fr.: numération grecque   

A → numeral system in which letters represent numbers. In an earlier system, called acrophonic, the symbols for numerals came from the first letter of the number name. Subsequently, the numerals were based on giving values to the letters of alphabet. For example α, β, γ, and δ represented 1, 2, 3, and 4; while ι, κ, λ, and μ stood for 10, 20, 30, and 40, and ρ, σ, τ, and υ for 100, 200, 300, and 400. The Greek also used the additive principle. For example 11, 12, 13, 14, and 374 were written ια, ιβ, ιγ, ιδ, and τοδ. The numbers between 1000 and 9000 were expressed by adding a subscript or superscript ι (iota) to the symbols for 1 to 9. For example ιA and ιΘ for 1000 and 9000. Numbers greater than 9999 were expressed using M, which was the myriad, 10,000. Therefore, since 123 was represented by ρκγ, 123,000 was written as Mρκγ.

numeral; → system.

hadron era
  دوران ِ هادرونی   
dowrân-e hâdroni

Fr.: ère hadronique   

The interval lasting until some 10-5 seconds after the Big Bang when the Universe was dominated by radiation and its temperature was around 1015 kelvins. It is preceded by → Planck era and followed by → lepton era.

hadron; → era.

Hamiltonian operator
  آپارگر ِ هامیلتون   
âpârgar-e Hamilton

Fr.: opérateur hamiltonien   

The dynamical operator in → quantum mechanics that corresponds to the → Hamiltonian function in classical mechanics.

Hamiltonian function; → operator.

Hawking temperature
  دمای ِ هاؤکینگ   
damâ-ye Hawking

Fr.: température de Hawking   

The temperature inferred for a → black hole based on the → Hawking radiation. For a → Schwarzschild black hole, one has TH = ħc3/(8πGMk) where ħ is the → reduced Planck's constant, c is the → speed of light, G is the → gravitational constant, M is the mass, and k is → Boltzmann's constant. The formula can approximately be written as: TH≅ 6.2 x 10-8 (Msun/M) K. Thus radiation from a solar mass black hole would be exceedingly cold, about 5 x 107 times colder than the → cosmic microwave background. Larger black holes would be colder still. Moreover, smaller black holes would have higher temperatures. A → mini black hole of mass about 1015 g would have TH≅ 1011 K.

Hawking radiation; → temperature.

Hayashi temperature
  دمای ِ هایاشی   
damâ-ye Hayashi

Fr.: température de Hayashi   

The minimum → effective temperature required for a → pre-main sequence star of given mass and radius to be in → hydrostatic equilibrium. This temperature delimits the boundary of the → Hayashi forbidden zone.

Hayashi track; → temperature.

hemeralopia
  روزکوری   
ruzkuri (#)

Fr.: héméralopie   

A defect of the eyes in which sight is normal in the night or in a dim light but is abnormally poor or wholly absent in the day or in a bright light. Also called day blindness. Opposite of → nyctalopia

From N.L., from Gk hemeralop- (stem of hemeralops having such a condition, from hemer(a) "day" + al(aos) "blind" + -ops having such an appearance) + -ia a noun suffix.

Ruzkuri, from ruz, → day, + kuri "blindness," from kur, → blind.

Hermitian operator
  آپارگر ِ اِرمیتی   
âpârgar-e Hermiti

Fr.: opérateur hermitien   

An operator A that satisfies the relation A = A*, where A* is the adjoint of A. → Hermitian conjugate.

Hermitian conjugate; → operator.

Hesperian era
  دوران ِ هسپریسی   
dowrân-e hesperisi

Fr.: ère hespérienne   

The Martian geologic era after the Noachian Era which lasted from about 3500 million to 2500 million years ago. During this period Martian climate began to change to drier, dustier conditions. Water that flowed on the Martian surface during the Noachian Era may have frozen as underground ice deposits, and most river channels probably experienced their final flow episodes during this era. → Noachian era; → Amazonian era.

Named after the Martian plains of Hesperis; → era.

hierarchical
  پایگانی   
pâygâni

Fr.: hiérarchique   

Of, belonging to, or characteristic of a hierarchy. → hierarchical clustering; → hierarchical cosmology; → hierarchical multiple system; → hierarchical structure formation.

hierarchy; → -al.

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