An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
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فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 139 Search : magnet
magnetosphere
  مغنات‌سپهر   
meqnâtsepehr

Fr.: magnétosphère   

The region around a celestial body in which the magnetic field of the body dominates the external magnetic field. Each planet with a magnetic field (Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) has a magnetopause. The Earth's magnetosphere is a dynamic system that responds to solar variations. It prevents most of the charged particles carried in the → solar wind, from hitting the Earth. Since the solar wind is → supersonic, a → bow shock is formed on the sunward side of the magnetosphere. The solar wind ahead is deflected at a boundary called → magnetopause. The region between the bow shock and the magnetopause is called the → magnetosheath. As the solar wind sweeps past the Earth, the terrestrial magnetic field lines are stretched out toward the night side to form a → magnetotail.

From → magnet + → sphere.

magnetotail
  مغنات‌دُم   
meqnâtdom

Fr.: queue magnétique   

The portion of a planet's → magnetosphere which is pushed away from the Sun by the solar wind. Earth's magnetosphere extends about 65,000 km on the day-side but more than 10 times further.

From → magneto- + → tail.

meridional magnetic field
  میدان ِ مغناتیسی ِ نیمروزانی   
meydân-e meqnâtisi-ye nimruzâni

Fr.: champ magnétiquue méridien   

In the → solar dynamo model, a magnetic field that points from the north to south or south to north.

meridional; → magnetic; → field.

nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)
  باز‌آوایی ِ مغناتیسی ِ هسته‌ای   
bâzâvâyi-ye meqnâtisi-ye haste-yi

Fr.: résonance magnétique nucléaire   

An analysis technique applied to some atomic nuclei that have the property to behave as small magnets and respond to the application of a magnetic field by absorbing or emitting electromagnetic radiation. When nuclei which have a magnetic moment (such as 1H, 13C, 29Si, or 31P) are submitted to a constant magnetic field and at the same time to a radio-frequency alternating magnetic field, the nuclear magnetic moment is excited to higher energy states if the alternating field has the specific resonance frequency. This technique is especially used in spectroscopic studies of molecular structure and in particular provides valuable information in medicine that can be used to deduce the structure of organic compounds.

nuclear; → magnetic; → resonance.

nuclear magnetism
  مغناتیس ِ هسته‌ای   
meqnâtis-e haste-yi (#)

Fr.: magnétisme nucléaire   

The magnetism associated with the magnetic field generated by atomic nuclei.

nuclear; → magnetism.

open magnetic field line
  خط ِ باز ِ میدان ِ مغناتیسی   
xatt-e bâz-e meydân-e meqnâtisi-ye

Fr.: ligne ouverte de champ magnétique   

In the context of solar physics, a → magnetic field line when it crosses the solar surface only once, i.e., when it goes from surface to infinity. This is the case at a sufficiently large scale in → coronal holes. This is mostly not the case in → active regions.

open; → magnetic; → field; → line.

paleomagnetism
  پارین‌مغناتیس   
pârin-meqnâtis

Fr.: paléomagnétisme   

The study of natural remanent magnetization in order to determine the intensity and direction of the Earth's magnetic field in the geologic past.

paleo-; → magnetism.

paramagnet
  پارامغنات   
pârâmeqnât

Fr.: para-aimant   

A paramagnetic substance, which possesses → paramagnetism.

para- + → magnet.

paramagnetic
  پارامغناتی   
pârâmeqnâti

Fr.: paramagnétique   

Relative to or characterized by → paramagnetism.

para- + → magnetic

paramagnetism
  پارامغنات‌مندی   
pârâmeqnâtmandi

Fr.: paramagnétisme   

The property of a substance that possesses a → magnetic permeability greater than that of a vacuum but significantly less than that exhibited by → ferromagnetism. In the absence of an external magnetic field the atomic → magnetic moments of the substance are randomly oriented and thus cancel each other out with no net total magnetic moment. Moreover the coupling between neighboring moments is weak. However, when a magnetic field is applied magnetic moments align with the direction of the field and so the magnetic moments add together. Therefore paramagnetic substances affect external fields in a positive way, by attraction to the field resulting in a local increase in the magnetic field. The → magnetization vanishes when the field is removed.

para- + → magnetism

permanent magnet
  آهنربای ِ ماندگار   
âhanrobâ-ye mândegâr

Fr.: aimant permanent   

A piece of magnetic material which, having been → magnetized, retains a substantial proportion of its → magnetization indefinitely. In permanent magnets the magnetic field is generated by the internal structure of the material itself. Atoms and crystals constituting materials are made up of electrons and atomic nuclei. Both the nucleus and the electrons themselves act like little magnets. There is also a magnetic field generated by the orbits of the electrons as they move about the nucleus. So the magnetic fields of permanent magnets are the sums of the nuclear spins, the electron spins and the orbits of the electrons themselves. In many materials, the magnetic fields are pointing in all sorts of random directions and cancel each other out and there is no permanent magnetism. But in certain materials, called → ferromagnets, all the spins and the orbits of the electrons will line up, causing the materials to become magnetic. Many permanent magnets are created by exposing the magnetic material to a very strong external magnetic field. Once the external magnetic field is removed, the treated magnetic material is now converted into a permanent magnet. Overheating a permanent magnet causes the magnet's atoms to vibrate violently and disrupt the alignment of the atomic domains and their dipoles. Once cooled, the domains will not realign as before on their own and will structurally become a temporary magnet (MagLab Dictionary).

permanent; → magnet.

poloidal magnetic field
  میدان ِ مغناتیسی ِ قطبی‌وار   
meydân-e meqnâtisi-ye qotbivâr

Fr.: champ magnétique poloïdal   

1) In → protoplanetary disk models, the magnetic field whose large-scale lines of force depart away from the → accretion disk, in the direction of the rotation axis.
2) In a → tokamak, the magnetic field produced by a current flowing in the → plasma vertically to the toroid plane. → toroidal magnetic field.

pole; → -oid; → magnetic field.

pulsar magnetosphere
  مغنات‌سپهر ِ پولسار   
meqnâtsepehr-e pulsâr

Fr.: magnétosphère de pulsar   

A dense zone of magnetized → plasma surrounding a → pulsar. The magnetosphere, lying between the surface of the → neutron star and the → light cylinder, corotates with the pulsar like a rigid body under the effect of strong magnetic field. The magnetosphere's thickness is determined by the constraint that the corotation velocity of its upper surface should not exceed the → speed of light.

pilsar; → magnetosphere.

solar magnetic cycle
  چرخه‌ی ِ مغناتیسی ِ خورشید   
carxe-ye meqnâtisi-ye xoršid

Fr.: cycle magnétique solaire   

The period of time, about 22 years, after which the magnetic → polarity of the Sun returns to its earlier state. It consists of two consecutive → solar cycles.

solar; → magnetic; → cycle.

solar magnetic field
  میدان ِ مغناتیسی ِ خورشید   
meydân-e meqnâtisi-ye xoršid (#)

Fr.: champ magnétique solaire   

The Sun's magnetic field which is probably created by the → differential rotation of the Sun together with the movement of charged particles in the → convective zone. Understanding how the solar magnetic field comes about is the fundamental problem of Solar Physics. The solar magnetic field is responsible for all solar magnetic phenomena, such as → sunspots, → solar flares, → coronal mass ejections, and the → solar wind. The solar magnetic fields are observed from the → Zeeman broadening of spectral lines, → polarization effects on radio emission, and from the channeling of charged particles into visible → coronal streamers. The strength of Sun's average magnetic field is 1 → gauss (twice the average field on the surface of Earth, around 0.5 gauss), and can be as strong as 4,000 Gauss in the neighborhood of a large sunspot.

solar; → magnetic; → field.

spin magnetic moment
  گشتاور ِ مغناتیسی ِ اسپین   
gaštâvar-e meqnâtisi-ye espin (#)

Fr.: moment magnétique de spin   

The magnetic moment associated with the → spin angular momentum of a charged particle. The direction of the magnetic moment is opposite to the direction of the angular momentum. The magnitude of the magnetic moment is given by: μ = -g(q / 2m)J, where q is the charge, m is the mass, and J the angular momentum. The parameter g is a characteristic of the state of the atom. It would be 1 for a pure orbital moment, or 2 for a spin moment, or some other number in between for a complicated system like an atom. The quantity in the parenthesis for the electron is the → Bohr magneton. The electron spin magnetic moment is important in the → spin-orbit interaction which splits atomic energy levels and gives rise to → fine structure in the spectra of atoms. It is also a factor in the interaction of atom with external fields, → Zeeman effect.

spin; → magnetic moment.

stellar magnetic field
  میدان ِ مغناتیسی ِ ستاره‌ای   
meydân-e meqnâtisi-ye setâre-yi

Fr.: champ magnétique stellaire   

The → magnetic field associated with a star. Magnetic fields are common among stars of solar and lower masses. So far definitive detections of fields in stars with masses ~1.5 Msun have, for the most part, been made for objects having anomalous chemical abundances (e.g., the → chemically peculiar A and B stars). Recently, however, observations of cyclic variability in the properties of → stellar winds from luminous → OB stars have been interpreted as evidence for the presence of large-scale magnetic fields in the surface layers and atmospheres of these objects (→ magnetic massive star). These inferences have been bolstered by the unambiguous measurement of a weak (~ 360 G) field in the chemically normal B1 IIIe star → Beta Cephei. These results suggest that magnetic fields of moderate strength might be more prevalent among → hot stars than had previously been thought. At the present time, the origin of magnetism in massive stars is not well understood. If the magnetic field of a hot star is produced by → dynamo effect in the → convective core, then a mechanism for transporting the field to the stellar surface must be identified. The finite electrical conductivity of the envelope leads to the outward diffusion of any fields contained therein, but only over an extended period of time. Estimates indicate that for stars more massive than a few solar masses, the resistive diffusion time across the radiative interior exceeds the → main sequence lifetime. Another possibility is that dynamo fields are advected from the core to the surface by rotation-induced → meridional circulation (MacGregor & Cassinelli, 2002, astro-ph/0212224).

stellar; → magnetic; → field.

toroidal magnetic field
  میدان ِ مغناتیسی ِ چنبروار   
meydân-e meqnâtisi-ye cambarvâr

Fr.: champ magnétique toroïdal   

A magnetic field which is generated in a → plasma inside a → toroid, as in a → tokamak, by the electric current which spirals around the toroid. Toroidal field has no radial component. → poloidal magnetic field.

toroid; → magnetic field.

uniform magnetic field
  میدان ِ مغناتیسی ِ یکدیس   
meydân-e meqnâtisi-ye yekdis

Fr.: champ magnétique uniforme   

A → magnetic field whose direction does not change and whose strength is constant at every point.

uniform; → magnetic; → field.

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