An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 192 Search : tin
contingent
  آمرسان   
âmarsân

Fr.: contigent   

1) Dependent for existence, occurrence, character, etc., on something not yet certain; conditional.
2) Liable to happen or not; uncertain; possible.
3) Logic: Describing a → proposition that is → true in some possible circumstances and → false in others. For example, "it snowed in Paris on 15 December 2000" is contingent: it is true, but it might have been false. On a → truth table a contingent proposition is one that is true for some possible → truth values of its constituent parts and false for others. See also → non-contingent.

M.E., from M.Fr. contingent and directly from L. contingentem (nominative contingens) "happening, touching," pr.p. of contingere "to touch," → contact.

Âmarsân, agent noun from *âmarsidan "to touch," related to parmâsidan "to touch, feel," → contact, Mid.Pers. marz "contact, touching," marzitan "to touch," Mod.Pers. mâlidan "to rub," Av. marəz- "to rub, wipe," marəza- "border, district," Mod.Pers. marz "border;" ultimately from Proto-Ir. *Hmars- "to touch."

continuation
  پیداشت؛ پیداد   
peydâšt; peydâd

Fr.: continuation   

The act or state of continuing; the state of being continued.

Verbal noun of → continue + → -tion.

continue
  ۱) پیداشتن؛ ۲) پیدادن   
1) peydâštan; 2) peydâdan

Fr.: continuer   

1) (v.intr) To go on or keep on without interruption as in some course or action.
2) (v.trans) To cause to remain in a particular condition.

M.E. contynuen, from O.Fr. continuer, from L. continuare "to make all one, join together, make or be continuous," from continuus "uninterrupted," from continere "to be uninterrupted," literally "to hold together," from → con- + tenere "to hold," cognate with Pers. tanidan, → tension.

1) Peydâštan, from pey "after; pursuit; track; step," → tracking, + dâštan "to have, hold, maintain," → access.
2) Peydâdan, from pey, as above, + dâdan "to give, yield, grant, command," → yield.

continued
  پیداشته   
peydâšté

Fr.: continue   

Continuing to happen or exist for a long time. Occurring many times.

Past participle of → continue.

continued fraction
  برخه‌ی ِ پیداشته   
barxe-ye peydâšté

Fr.: fraction continue   

In mathematics, a fraction whose numerator is an integer and whose denominator is an integer plus a fraction whose numerator is an integer and whose denominator is an integer plus a fraction and so on.

continued; → fraction.

continuous
  پیوسته   
peyvasté (#)

Fr.: continu   

1) General: Uninterrupted in extent, sequence, or time.
2) Math.: A line or curve that extends without a break. → continuous function.

From L. continuus "uninterrupted," from contin(ere) "to hold together, retain," → continue, + -uus verbal adj. suffix.

Peyvasté "continous," peyvastan "to connect, join," Mid.Pers. paywastan, from *pati-basta-, from suffix pati- (Mid.Pers. pât-,from O.Pers. paity "agaist, back, opposite to, toward, face to face, in front of," Av. paiti, akin to Skt. práti "toward, against, again, back, in return, opposite," Pali pati-, Gk. proti, pros "face to face with, toward, in addition to, near;" PIE *proti) + basta- "tied, shut" (Av./O.Pers. band- "to bind, fetter," banda- "band, tie," Skt. bandh- "to bind, tie, fasten," PIE *bhendh- "to bind," cf. Ger. binden, E. bind), cf. Skt. prati-bandh- "to tie."

continuous data
  داده‌های ِ پیوسته   
dâdehâ-ye peyvasté

Fr.: données continues   

Data that can take any value along a continuum (e.g. air temperature between two upper and lower boundaries) as opposed to → discrete data, which can only take integer values.

continuous; → data.

continuous function
  کریای ِ پیوسته   
karyâ-ye peyvasté

Fr.: fonction continue   

The function y = f(x) is called continuous at the point x = x0 if it is defined in some neighborhood of the point x0 and if lim Δy = 0 when Δx → 0.

continuous; → function.

continuous spectrum
  بیناب ِ پیوسته   
binâb-e peyvasté

Fr.: spectre continu   

An electromagnetic spectrum in which emitted or absorbed radiation is present continuously over all wavelengths in a given range.

continuous; → spectrum.

Binâb, → spectrum; peyvastécontinuous.

continuous variable
  ورتنده‌ی ِ پیوسته   
vartande-ye peyvasté

Fr.: variable continu   

A variable which has changes continuously, in contrast to → discrete variables.

continuous; → variable.

continuous-time quantum walk
  پویش ِ کو‌آنتومی با زمان ِ پیوسته   
puyeš-e kuântomi bâ zamân-e peyvasté

Fr.: marche quantique à temps continu   

A → quantum walk taking place entirely in the position space. Continuous-time quantum walk was introduced by E. Farhi & S. Gutmann (1998, Phys. Rev. A 58, 915).

continuous; → time; → quantum; → walk.

continuum
  پیوستار   
peyvastâr (#)

Fr.: continuum   

A continuous extent or succession, which has no discrete parts, as the continuum of real numbers as opposed to the sequence of discrete integers. → continuum emission.

From L. neut. of continuus, → continuous

Peyvastâr, from peyvast past tense stem of peyvastan "to connect, join," Mid.Pers. paywastan, from *pati-basta-, from suffix pati- (Mid.Pers. pât-, from O.Pers. paity "agaist, back, opposite to, toward, face to face, in front of," Av. paiti, akin to Skt. práti "toward, against, again, back, in return, opposite," Pali pati-, Gk. proti, pros "face to face with, toward, in addition to, near;" PIE *proti) + basta- "tied, shut" (Av./O.Pers. band- "to bind, fetter," banda- "band, tie," Skt. bandh- "to bind, tie, fasten," PIE *bhendh- "to bind," cf. Ger. binden, E. bind), cf. Skt. prati-bandh- "to tie." + -âr suffix forming verbal noun.

continuum emission
  گسیل ِ پیوستار   
gosil-e peyvastâr

Fr.: émission continuum   

A continuous radiation produced by three processes: radiative recombination due to transition between electron free-free states, two-photon decays of metastable levels, and thermal bremsstrahlung.

continuum; → emission.

continuum-driven wind
  باد ِ پیوستار‌زاد   
bâd-e peyvastârzâd

Fr.: vent induit par continuum   

The transfer of photon momentum to free electrons. The acceleration by → continuum emission can be given by: ac = (σ/m)(L*/4πR2c), where σ is the → Thomson scattering  → cross section, m is the mass per free electron, L* is → stellar luminosity, R* is radius, and c the → speed of light. The ratio of ac to the → surface gravity is ≅ 2 × 10-5L*/M*, with M* and L* in solar units. The atmosphere is is stable if ac very smaller than ggrav. If L* is above the → Eddington limit, the radiation pressure in the continuum leads to very heavy → mass loss and thus to expanding envelopes (K.S. de Boer & W. Seggewiss, 2008, Stars and Stellar Evolution, EDP Sciences).

continuum; → drive; → wind.

convective overshooting
  فرازد ِ همبزی   
farâzad-e hambazi

Fr.: dépassement convectif   

In a → massive star, penetration of the upper layers of the → convective core into the → radiative zone due to → turbulence effects. The enlargement of the convective core results in more luminous stars in theoretical models.

convective; → overshooting.

core overshooting
  فرازد ِ مغزه   
farâzad-e maqzé

Fr.: dépassement du cœur   

convective overshooting.

core; → overshooting.

corotating interaction region (CIR)
  ناحیه‌ی ِ اندرژیرش ِ هم‌چرخنده   
nâhiye-ye andaržireš-e hamcarxandé

Fr.: région d'interaction en corotation   

A spiral-shaped density enhancement formed around a star when fast stellar winds collide with slower material. This large-scale wind structure can extend from the stellar surface to possibly several tens of stellar radii. The CIRs can be produced by intensity irregularities at the stellar surface, such as dark and bright spots, magnetic loops and fields, or non-radial pulsations. The surface intensity variations alter the radiative wind acceleration locally, which creates streams of faster and slower wind material. CIRs are responsible for the → discrete absorption components seen in some ultraviolet → resonance lines of → hot stars (S. R. Cranmer & S. P. Owocki, 1996, ApJ 462, 469).

corotate; → interaction; → region.

correcting plate
  تیغه‌ی ِ ارشاینده، ~ ارشاگر   
tiqe-ye aršâyandé, ~ aršâgar

Fr.: lame correctrice   

A large glass plate placed at the entrance of a Schmidt telescope to correct for spherical aberration over the large field of view.

correct; → plate.

Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event
  رویداد ِ خاموشی ِ گچاسا-پارینزاد   
ruydâd-e xâmuši-ye Gacâsâ-Pârinzâd

Fr.: extinction Crétacé-Tertiaire   

The → mass extinction event that destroyed the dinosaurs and a majority of other species on Earth approximately 65 million years ago. This event is believed to have been the impact of a 10 km-size → asteroid or → comet nucleus and its aftereffects, including a severe → impact winter. The collision would have released the energy equivalent to 100 million megatonnes (teratonnes) of → TNT, i.e. more than 109 times the energy of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Same as the → Cretaceous-Tertiary event.

Cretaceous; → Paleogene; → extinction; → event.

curve fitting
  سز ِ خم، سزکرد ِ ~   
saz-e xam, sazkard-e ~

Fr.: ajustement de courbe   

Construction of mathematical functions whose graphs are curves that "best" approximate a given collection of data points.

curve; → fitting.

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