An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
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فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 5 Search : brown
brown
  قهوه‌ای   
qahve-yi (#)

Fr.: brun   

A dusky color between red and black.

M.E. broun, from O.E. brun "dark," cf. Du. bruin, Ger. braun; PIE base *bher- "shining, brown," related to *bheros "dark animal" (cf. beaver, bear).

Qahvei-yi, color of qahvé "coffee."

brown dwarf
  کوتوله‌ی ِ قهوه‌ای   
kutule-ye qahvei

Fr.: naine brune   

A star-like object whose mass is too small to sustain → hydrogen fusion in its interior and become a star. Brown dwarfs are → substellar objects and occupy an intermediate regime between those of stars and giant planets. With a mass less than 0.08 times that of the Sun (about 80 → Jupiter masses), nuclear reactions in the core of brown dwarfs are limited to the transformation of → deuterium into 3He. The reason is that the cores of these objects are supported against → gravitational collapse by electron → degeneracy pressure (at early spectral types) and → Coulomb pressure (at later spectral types). Brown dwarfs, as ever cooling objects, will have late M dwarf spectral types within a few Myrs of their formation and gradually evolve as L, T and Y dwarfs → brown dwarf cooling. As late-M and early-L dwarfs, they overlap in temperature with the cool end of the stellar → main sequence (→ M dwarf, → L dwarf, → T dwarf, → Y dwarf). In contrast to the OBAFGKM sequence, the M-L-T-Y sequence is an evolutionary one. These objects were first postulated by Kumar (1963, ApJ 137, 1121 & 1126) and Hayashi & Nakano (1963, Prog. Theor.Phys. 30, 460).

The term brown dwarf was first used by Jill Tarter in her 1975 PhD thesis; → brown; → dwarf.

brown dwarf cooling
  سردش ِ کوتوله‌ی ِ قهوه‌ای   
sardeš-e kutule-ye qahve-yi

Fr.: refroidissement de naine brune   

The process whereby a → brown dwarf cools over time after the → deuterium burning phase, which lasts a few 107 years. The → effective temperature and luminosity decrease depending on the mass, age, and → metallicity. Even though massive brown dwarfs may start out with star-like luminosity (≥ 10-3solar luminosities), they progressively fade with age to the point where, after 0.5 Gyr all → substellar objects are less luminous than the dimmest, lowest mass stars. More explicitly, brown dwarfs may start as star-like objects hotter than 2200 K, with → M dwarf spectral types, and, as they get older, pass through the later and cooler L, T, and Y spectral types (→ L dwarf, → T dwarf, → Y dwarf).

brown; → dwarf; → cooling.

brown dwarf desert
  کویر ِ کوتوله‌های ِ قهوه‌ای   
kavir-e kutulehâ-ye qahvei

Fr.: désert des naines brunes   

The observational result indicating a deficit in the frequency of → brown dwarf companions to Sun-like stars, either relative to the frequency of less massive planetary companions or relative to the frequency of more massive stellar companions. However, this desert exists mainly for low-separation brown dwarfs detected using orbital velocity surveys. No brown dwarf desert is noticed at wide separations (J. E. Gizis et al. 2001, ApJ 551, L163).

brown; → dwarf; → desert.

Brownian motion
  جنبش ِ براؤنی   
jonbeš-e Brawni

Fr.: mouvement brownien   

The continuous random motion of solid microscopic particles immersed in a fluid due to bombardment by the atoms and molecules of the medium. The first quantitative explanation of the phenomenon, based on the kinetic theory of gases, was forwarded by A. Einstein in 1905.

Named after Robert Brown (1773-1858), a Scottish botanist, who first in 1827 noticed the erratic motion of pollen grains suspended in water. → motion.