An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 419 Search : per
temperature inversion
  واگردانی ِ دما   
vâgardâni-ye damâ

Fr.: inversion de température   

Meteo.: A reversal in the normal temperature decrease, the temperature rising with increased elevation in the atmosphere instead of falling. A layer in which temperature increases with altitude.

temperature; → inversion.

tensor perturbation
  پرتورش ِ تانسوری   
partureš-e tânsori

Fr.: perturbation tensorielle   

The perturbation in the → primordial Universe plasma caused by → gravitational waves. These waves stretch and squeeze space in orthogonal directions and bring about → quadrupole anisotropy in incoming radiation temperature.

tensor; → perturbation.

thermodynamic temperature
  دمای ِ گرماتوانیک   
damâ-ye garmâtavânik

Fr.: température thermodynamique   

A temperature scale, measured in → kelvin (K), that is related to the energy possessed by matter; it was formerly known as → absolute temperature. The zero point on the scale (0 K) is absolute zero. Thermodynamic temperature can be converted to temperature on the → Celsius scale by subtracting 273.15.

thermodynamic; → temperature.

thermonuclear supernova
  ابر-نو-اختر ِ گرماتوانیک   
abar-now-axtar-e garmâtavânik

Fr.: supernova thermonucléaire   

Same as → type Ia supernova

thermonuclear; → supernova.

thought experiment
  اندیش-آزمایش، آزمایش ِ اندیشه‌ای   
andiš-âzmâyeš, âzmâyeš-e andišeyi

Fr.: expérience de pensée   

A demonstration which is carried out in the realm of the imagination, rather than in a laboratory. Thought experiments are designed to test ideas, theories, and hypotheses which cannot physically be tested, at least with current scientific equipment. Some examples: → Maxwell's demon; → Einstein's elevator; Heisenberg's gamma-ray microscope; → Schrodinger's cat. Also called Gedanken experiment.

thought; → experiment. Based on both the Ger./L. compound Gedankenexperiment and its Ger. equivalent Gedankenversuch.

time of periapsis passage
  زمان ِ گذر از پیراهباک   
zamân-e gozar az pirâhabâk

Fr.: temps de passage au périapse   

One of the → orbital elements, the time when the → secondary body reaches → periapsis.

time; → periapsis; → passage.

toothed-wheel experiment
  آزمایش ِ چرخ ِ دندانه‌دار   
âzmâyeš-e carx-e dandâne-dâr

Fr.: expérience de la roue dentée   

The experiment which provided the first accurate measurement of the speed of light. The experiment, conducted by the French physicist Armand H. L. Fizeau (1819-1896) in 1849, used a rotating wheel containing 720 teeth. The function of the wheel was to cut a light beam into short pulses and to measure the time required for these pulses to travel to a distant mirror and back (17.34 km). The round-trip time for each pulse could be calculated to be about 1/18,000 sec, which yielded the value of 315,300 km/sec for the speed of light. Leon Foucault (1819-1868) improved on Fizeau's method by replacing the cogwheel with a rotating mirror. Foucault's estimate, published in 1862, was 298,000 km/s.

From tooth; M.E.; O.E. toth (cf. O.S., Dan., Swed., Du. tand, O.N. tönn, O.Fris. toth, O.H.G. zand, Ger. Zahn, Goth. tunthus), cognate with Pers. dandân, as below; → wheel; → experiment.

Âzmâyeš, → experiment; carxwheel; dandâne-dâr "toothed," from dandân "tooth," Mid.Pers. dandân; Av. dantan-; cf. Skt. dánta-; Gk. odontos; L. dens (Fr. dent); Lith. dantis, O.Ir. det, Welsh dent; PIE base *dont-/*dent- "tooth."

Trouton-Noble experiment
  آزمایش ِ تروتون-نوبل   
âzmâyeš-e Trouton-Noble

Fr.: expérience de Trouton-Noble   

An experiment first carried out in 1903 to reveal the absolute motion of the Earth with respect to the → ether. The experiment consists of detecting a torque on a charged parallel-plate → capacitor that was suspended so that its plates were vertical. Since the Earth moves around the Sun, the moving charges were expected to produce magnetic fields, and the resulting torque should tend to turn the capacitor bringing its plates parallel to its velocity. No such effect was observed, and the absence of the torque supports the theory of → special relativity.

Named after Frederick T. Trouton (1863-1922) and Henry R. Noble; → experiment.

Type I supernova
  ابر-نو-اختر ِ گونه‌ی ِ I   
abar-now-axtar-e gune-ye I

Fr.: supernova de type I   

A type of supernova whose spectra lacks hydrogen lines. Its → light curve exhibits a sharp maximum with a gradual decrease. Typical magnitudes MV = -14 to -17. Ejecta velocities about 10,000 km/sec. Type I supernovae have several subtypes: → Type Ia, → Type Ib, and → Type Ic.

Type I initially introduced by R. Minkowski (1941, PASP 53, 224); → type; → supernova.

Type Ia supernova
  ابر-نو-اختر ِ گونه‌ی ِ Ia   
abar-now-axtar-e gune-ye Ia

Fr.: supernova de type Ia   

A → Type I supernova that presents a singly-ionized silicon (Si II) absorption feature at 6150 Å near peak brightness. Type Ia SNe are believed to result from mass → accretion to a carbon-oxygen → white dwarf in a → close binary system. When the white dwarf mass exceeds the → Chandrasekhar limit, the → degenerate electron pressure can no longer support the accumulated mass and the star collapses in a thermonuclear explosion producing a supernova. The → peak luminosity of SNe Ia is set by the radioactive decay chain 56Ni → 56Co → 56Fe, and the observed photometric correlation between the peak luminosity and the time-scale over which the → light curve decays from its maximum is understood physically as having both the luminosity and → opacity being set by the mass of 56Ni synthesized in the explosion. Type Ia supernovae occur in all types of galaxies. Type Ia SNe are used as → standard candles in determining cosmological distances, after normalizing their light curves with the → Phillips relation.

type; → supernova.

Type Ib supernova
  ابر-نو-اختر ِ گونه‌ی ِ Ib   
abar-now-axtar-e gune-ye Ib

Fr.: supernova de type Ia   

A → Type I supernova that has neutral helium line (He I) at 5876 Å, and no strong silicon (Si II) absorption feature at 6150 Å. Type Ib supernovae are believed to result from the evolution of → massive stars.

type; → supernova.

Type Ic supernova
  ابر-نو-اختر ِ گونه‌ی ِ Ic   
abar-now-axtar-e gune-ye Ic

Fr.: supernova de type Ia   

A → Type I supernova that shows weak or no helium lines and no strong silicon (Si II) absorption feature near 6150 Å. Type Ic supernovae are believed to result from the evolution of → massive stars.

type; → supernova.

Type II supernova
  ابر-نو-اختر ِ گونه‌ی ِ II   
abar-now-axtar-e gune-ye II

Fr.: supernova de type II   

A supernova type whose spectrum contains hydrogen lines. Compared with → Type I supernovae, its → light curve has a broader peak at maximum and dies away more rapidly. The magnitudes are smaller, ranging from MV = -12 to -13.5, and the ejecta have lower velocities (about 5,000 km/sec). These supernovae, which result from the final evolution of → massive stars, have three main divisions: → Type II-P, → Type II-L, and → Type II-n.

Type II initially introduced by R. Minkowski (1941, PASP 53, 224); → type; → supernova.

Type II-L supernova (SN II-L)
  ابر-نو-اختر ِ گونه‌ی ِ II-L   
abar-now-axtar-e gune-ye II-L

Fr.: supernova de type II-L   

A → Type II supernova which displays a linear decrease in its → light curve.

Type II supernova; L short for → linear.

Type II-n supernova (SN II-n)
  ابر-نو-اختر ِ گونه‌ی ِ II-n   
abar-now-axtar-e gune-ye II-n

Fr.: supernova de type II-n   

A → Type II supernova which shows intermediate or very narrow width hydrogen → emission lines in the spectra.

Type II supernova; n short for → narrow.

Type II-P supernova (SN II-P)
  ابر-نو-اختر ِ گونه‌ی ِ II-P   
abar-now-axtar-e gune-ye II-P

Fr.: supernova de type II-P   

A → Type II supernova which reaches a plateau in its → light curve. The vast majority of Type II SNe are characterized by a fast (few days) rise to a flat light curve, most pronounced in the reddest optical bands, with a duration of 80-100 days. This plateau phase is interpreted as the recession of the photosphere as the ejecta expand and cool. The spectra of SNe II-P are typically dominated by strong → P Cygni profiles of hydrogen lines, as well as iron absorption features (for a review, e.g., see Filippenko 1997, ARA&A 35, 309).

Type II supernova; P short for → plateau.

ultrashort-period Cepheid
  کفیءوسی ِ اولتر-کوتاه-دوره   
Kefeid-e ultar-kutâh-dowré

Fr.: céphéide à très courte période   

A → Cepheid star of → spectral type A-F with regular pulsation period of 1-3 hours and with small variations in amplitude. This group is also known as δ Scuti stars.

ultra-; → short; → period; → Cepheid.

unitary operator
  آپارگر ِ یکایی   
âpârgar-e yekâyi

Fr.: opérateur unitaire   

A linear operator whose inverse is its → adjoint. In addition to → Hermitian operators, unitary operators constitute a fundamentally important class of quantum-mechanical operators.

unitary; → operator.

upper
  بالا، زبرین   
bâlâ (#), zabarin (#)

Fr.: supérieur   

Higher, as in place, position, pitch, or in a scale.

Upper, from → up, → hyper-.

Bâlâ, → up; zabarin, → superior.

upper arm
  بازو   
bâzu (#)

Fr.: haut du bras   

The part of the → arm between the → shoulder and the → elbow.

upper; → arm.

Bâzu "arm," from Mid.Pers. bâzûk "arm;" Av. bāzu- "arm;" Mod.Pers. bâhu "stick, staff; arm;" cf. Skt. bāhu- "arm, forearm;" Gk. pechys "forearm, arm, ell;" O.H.G. buog "shoulder;" Ger. Bug "shoulder;" Du. boeg; O.E. bôg, bôh "shoulder, bough;" E. bough " a branch of a tree;" PIE *bhaghu- "arm").

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