An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 35 Search : curve
absorption curve
  خم ِ درشم   
xam-e daršam

Fr.: courbe d'absorption   

A graphic representation of the amount of radiant energy absorbed by a material as a function of the wavelength.

absorption; → curve.

analytic curve
  خم ِ آنالسی   
xam-e ânâlasi

Fr.: courbe analytique   

A curve whose parametric equations are real → analytic functions of a single real variable.

analytic; → curve.

blackbody curve
  خم ِ سیه‌جسم   
xam-e siyah-jesm

Fr.: courbe de corps noir   

The characteristic way in which the → intensity of → radiation emitted by a → blackbody varies with its → frequency (or → wavelength), as described by → Planck's radiation law. Also referred to as the → Planck curve. The exact form of the curve depends only on the object's → temperature. The wavelength at which the emitted intensity is highest is an indication of the temperature of the radiating object. As the temperature of the blackbody increases, the peak wavelength decreases (→ Wien's displacement law) and the total energy being radiated (the area under the curve) increases rapidly (→ Stefan-Boltzmann law).

blackbody; → curve.

calibration curve
  خمِ کبیزش   
xam-e kabizeš

Fr.: courbe d'étalonnage   

An empirical curve obtained through appropriate exposures in order to determine the instrument's response. For example, a curve allowing the conversion of relative intensities of an observed object into absolute fluxes, or a curve relating the detector's pixel positions to wavelengths.

calibration; → curve.

caustic curve
  خم ِ سوچان   
xam-e sucân

Fr.: courbe caustique   

The intersection of a → caustic surface with a plane passing through the beam of rays.

caustic; → curve.

characteristic curve
  خم ِ سرشتاری   
xam-e sereštâri

Fr.: courbe caractéristique   

Graph representing an optical film's response to the amount of light falling on it.

characteristic; → curve.

closed curve
  خم ِ بسته   
xam-e basté (#)

Fr.: courbe fermée   

A curve whose ends are joined.

closed; → curve.

compound curve
  خم ِ چندساخت   
xam-e candsâxt

Fr.: courbe composée   

A curve that is made up of a series of successive tangent circular arcs.

compound; → curve.

Crussard curve
  خم ِ کروسار   
xam-e Crussard

Fr.: courbe de Crussard   

A curve, on the pressure versus specific volume plane, representing the locus of all the theoretically possible states that can be attained by the → detonation products of an → explosive. The Crussard curve relates to the → Hugoniot curve through a translation caused by the chemical energy liberated during the detonation. The Crussard curve consists of several portions characterizing various burning regimes: detonations (strong and weak), a forbidden region, and → deflagrations (weak and strong).

Named after the French engineer Jules Louis Crussard (1876-1959), who conducted several pioneering studies in mining techniques, in particular on shock waves (Ondes de choc et onde explosive, Bulletin de la Société de l'industrie minérale de Saint-Etienne, 4e série, tome VI, 1907); → curve.

curve
  خم   
xam (#)

Fr.: courbe   

A line that deviates from straightness in a smooth, continuous fashion. A line representing a variable on a graph.

From L. curvus "crooked, curved, bent;" cf. Av. skarəna- "round," Gk. kirkos, krikos "a ring;" PIE base *sker- "to turn, bend."

Xam, variant kamân "arc," Mid.Pers. kamân, probably from PIE *kamb- "to bend, crook," cf. Breton kamm "curved, bent."

curve fitting
  سز ِ خم، سزکرد ِ ~   
saz-e xam, sazkard-e ~

Fr.: ajustement de courbe   

Construction of mathematical functions whose graphs are curves that "best" approximate a given collection of data points.

curve; → fitting.

curve of growth
  خم ِ رویش   
xam-e ruyeš

Fr.: courbe de croissance   

A plot showing how the → equivalent width of an → absorption line, or the radiance of an → emission line, increases as a → function of the → number of → atoms that produce the line.

curve; → growth.

curved
  خمیده   
xamidé (#)

Fr.: courbé   

Not straight.

Adj. from → curve.

dispersion curve
  خم ِ پاشش   
xam-e pâšeš

Fr.: courbe de dispersion   

A graph displaying the variation of the → refractive index of a substance against the wavelength of the electromagnetic wave passing through the substance.

dispersion; → curve.

drift curve
  خم ِ دلک   
xam-e delek

Fr.: courbe de passage   

In radio astronomy, the output response as a function of position for a given filter as the source passes through the beam.

drift; → curve.

exponential curve
  خم ِ نمایی   
xam-e nemâyi (#)

Fr.: courbe exponentielle   

A curve that represents an → exponential function.

exponential; → curve.

extinction curve
  خم ِ خاموشی   
xam-e xâmuši

Fr.: courbe de l'extinction interstellaire   

A graph representing the variation of the → interstellar extinction against → wavelength. Usually it displays the → normalized values of extinction as a function of (the → inverse) of the wavelength (in → microns). See, e.g., Sandage & Mathis, 1979, Ann. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 17, 73.

extinction; → curve.

family of curves
  خانواده‌ی ِ خمها   
xânevâde-ye xamhâ

Fr.: famille de courbes   

A set of similar curves which are distinguished by the values taken by one or more parameters in their general equation. For example, the general solution of a differential equation is represented by a family of curves.

family; → curve.

flat rotation curve
  خم ِ چرخش ِ تخت   
xam-e carxeš-e taxt

Fr.: courbe de rotation plate   

A galactic → rotation curve in which the → rotation velocity is constant in the outer parts. The flat component is preceded by a rising curve that shows solid body rotation in the very center of the → galaxy. A flat rotation curve implies that the mass is still increasing linearly with radius. See also → dark matter.

flat; → rotation; → curve.

Hugoniot curve
  خم ِ هوگونیو   
xam-e Hugoniot

Fr.: courbe de Hugoniot   

A curve, on the pressure versus specific volume plane, representing the locus of all the possible states that can be reached by a substance immediately after the passage of a single → shock wave. For each initial condition there is a different curve. No combustion occurs in the process and, therefore, the chemical composition of the medium does not change. See also → Rayleigh line; → Crussard curve.

Named after the French physicist Pierre Henri Hugoniot (1851-1887), who worked on fluid mechanics, especially flow properties before and after shock waves; → curve.

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