An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 14 Search : luminous
luminous
  تابان، تابشی   
tâbân (#), tâbeši (#)

Fr.: lumineux   

Radiating light or other types of electromagnetic energy.

From L. luminosus "shining, full of light," from → lumen (gen. luminis) "light," related to lucere "to shine."

Tâbân "luminous," verbal adj. of tâbidan "to shine," variants tâftan "to shine," tafsidan "to become hot," related to tâb "heat, burning; heated iron; torment," âftâb "sunshine," tâbé "frying-pan," tab "fever;" dialect of Gaz tôu-, tôwâ "to shine;" Khotanese ttav- "to be hot;" Mid.Pers. tâftan "to heat, burn, shine;" taftan "to become hot;" Parthian tâb- "to shine;" Av. tāp-, taf- "to warm up, heat," tafsat "became hot," tāpaiieiti "to create warmth;" cf. Skt. tap- "to heat, be/become hot; to spoil, injure, damage; to suffer," tapati "burns;" L. tepere "to be warm," tepidus "warm;" PIE base *tep- "to be warm."

Luminous Blue Variable (LBV)
  ورتنده‌ی ِ آبی ِ تابان   
vartande-ye âbi-ye tâbân

Fr.: variable bleue lumineuse   

A high-luminosity variable star, which represents a transition phase in the life of a massive star when it evolves off the main sequence to become a supernova. Only about a dozen confirmed LBVs are presently known in our Galaxy. → Hubble-Sandage variable.

luminous; → blue; → variable.

luminous flux
  شار ِ تابشی   
šâr-e tâbeši (#)

Fr.: flux lumineux   

A measure of the rate of flow of luminous energy, evaluated according to its ability to produce a visual sensation. It is measured in lumens.

luminous; → flux.

luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG)
  کهکشان ِ فروسرخ ِ تابان   
kahkešân-e forusorx-e tâbân

Fr.: galaxie lumineuse en infrarouge   

A galaxy that emits most of its energy in the infrared and whose infrared luminosity (in the 8-1000 µm range) is more than 1011 solar luminosities. → ultraluminous infrared galaxy.

luminous; → infrared; → galaxy.

luminous intensity
  درتنویی ِ تابشی   
dartanuyi-ye tâbeši

Fr.: intensité lumineuse   

A measure of the amount of light that a point source radiates in a given direction. It is expressed by the luminous flux per unit leaving the source in the direction per unit of solid angle.

luminous; → intensity.

luminous matter
  مادّه‌ی ِ تابان   
mâdde-ye tâbân (#)

Fr.: matière lumineuse   

Ordinary baryonic matter that can emit electromagnetic radiation, as opposed to → dark matter.

luminous; → matter.

luminous red nova (LRN)
  نو‌اختر ِ سرخ ِ تابان   
now-axtar-e sorx-e tâbân

Fr.: nova rouge lumineuse   

A stellar explosion thought to be caused by the → merger of stars in a → binary system. They are characterized by a distinct red color, and a → light curve that lingers with resurgent brightness in the → infrared. The luminosity of the explosion is between that of a → supernova and a → nova.

luminous; → red; → nova

non-luminous matter
  ماده‌ی ِ ناتابان   
mâdde-ye nâtâbân

Fr.: matière non lumineuse   

Not ordinary matter. Same as → dark matter.

non-; → luminous; → matter.

subluminous star
  ستاره‌ی ِ زیر-تابان   
setâre-ye zir-tâbân

Fr.: étoile sous-lumineuse   

A star that is less luminous than a main-sequence star of the same spectral type.

sub-; → luminous; → star.

superluminous
  ابر-تابان   
abartâbân

Fr.: superlumineux   

The quality of an object whose luminosity exceeds a certain value.

super-; → luminous.

superluminous supernova
  ابر-نو-اختر ِ ابر-تابان   
abarnowaxtar-e abartâbân

Fr.: supernova superlumineuse   

A → supernova with an → absolute magnitude of about -22 in optical. Examples of these newly discovered SNe include SN 2006gy, SN 2005ap, and SNe 2003ma. The nature of these objects is poorly known. Some of them are powered by the circumstellar interaction, or by the shock breakout from the dense circumstellar medium, as suggested by the presence of narrow emission lines in superluminous → Type II-N supernovae. It is also argued that superluminous SNe could be powered by a large amount of 56Ni which is synthesized as a result of energetic → core-collapse supernovae. Other scenarios include the interaction between shells ejected by the pulsational → pair-instability. See, e.g. Tanaka et al. 2012, MNRAS 422, 2675, arXiv:1202.3610, and references therein.

superluminous; → supernova.

ultraluminous
  اولتر-تابان   
ultar-tâbân

Fr.: ultralumineux   

The quality of an object whose → luminosity exceeds a certain value.

ultra-; → luminous.

ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG)
  کهکشانِ فروسرخ ِ اولتر-تابان   
kahkešân-e forusorx-e ultar-tâbân

Fr.: galaxie ultralumineuse en infrarouge   

A galaxy that emits more than 90% of its energy in the infrared (8-1000 µm) and whose infrared luminosity exceeds 1012 solar luminosities. → luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG). Quasars can also have such high or even higher bolometric luminosities. However LIRGs and ULIRGs emit the bulk of their energy in the infrared. Most of ULIRGs are found in merging and interacting galaxy systems. It is thought that their luminosity results from galactic collisions, which increase the rate of star formation.

ultraluminous; → infrared; → galaxy.

ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX)
  خن ِ پرتو ِ ایکس ِ اولتر-تابان   
xan-e partow-e iks-e ultar-tâbân

Fr.: source ultralumineuse en rayons X   

An X-ray source that is not in the nucleus of a galaxy, and is more luminous than 1039 ergs s-1, brighter than the → Eddington luminosity of a 10 → solar mass → black hole. In general, there is about one ULX per galaxy in galaxies which host ULXs. The Milky Way contains no such objects. ULXs are thought to be powered by → accretion onto a → compact object. Possible explanations include accretion onto → neutron stars with strong → magnetic fields, onto → stellar black holes (of up to 20 → solar masses) at or in excess of the classical Eddington limit, or onto → intermediate-mass black holes (103-105 solar masses). NGC 1313X-1, NGC 5408X-1, and NGC 6946X-1 are three ULXs with X-ray luminosities up to ~ 1040 erg s-1 (Ciro Pinto et al., 2016, Nature 533, N) 7601).

ultraluminous; → X-ray source.