An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 3079 Search : on
hadron
  هادرون   
hâdron (#)

Fr.: hadron   

Any elementary particle which experiences the strong nuclear force. There are two sorts of hadrons: mesons, which have zero spin, and baryons, which have spin 1/2 or 3/2.

Hadron, from Gk. hadr(os) "thick, bulky" + -on a suffix used in the names of subatomic particles (gluon, meson, neutron), quanta (photon, graviton), and other minimal entities or components (magneton).

hadron era
  دوران ِ هادرونی   
dowrân-e hâdroni

Fr.: ère hadronique   

The interval lasting until some 10-5 seconds after the Big Bang when the Universe was dominated by radiation and its temperature was around 1015 kelvins. It is preceded by → Planck era and followed by → lepton era.

hadron; → era.

hadronic
  هادرونی   
hâdroni (#)

Fr.: hadronique   

Of or related to → hadrons.

hadron; → -ic.

hadronic matter
  ماده‌ی ِ هادرونی   
mâde-ye hâdroni (#)

Fr.: matière hadronique   

Ordinary matter composed of → hadrons.

hadronic; → matter.

halation
  هاله‌گیری   
hâlegiri

Fr.: halo   

1) In a cathode-ray tube, the glow surrounding a bright spot that appears on the fluorescent screen as the result of the screen's light being reflected by the front and rear surfaces of the tube's face.
2) The effect in which a halo appears around the image of a bright object recorded on a photographic film or plate. It is produced by the fan-like pattern of light reflected through the emulsion by the medium's backing material.

Halation, from hal(o), → halo + -ation a combination of -ate and -ion, used to form nouns from stems in -ate.

Hâlegiri, from hâlé, → halo + giri, verbal noun of gereftan "to take, seize" (Mid.Pers. griftan, Av./O.Pers. grab- "to take, seize," cf. Skt. grah-, grabh- "to seize, take," graha "seizing, holding, perceiving," M.L.G. grabben "to grab," from P.Gmc. *grab, E. grab "to take or grasp suddenly;" PIE base *ghrebh- "to seize").

half moon
  نیمه‌مانگ، نیمه‌ماه   
nime mâng, nime mâh (#)

Fr.: demi-lune   

The moon when, at either quadrature, half its disk is illuminated.

half; → moon.

halo occupation distribution (HOD)
  واباژش ِ هگش ِ هاله   
vâbâžeš-e hageš-e hâlé

Fr.: distribution d'occupation de halo   

The → probability distribution of the → number of galaxies that a host → dark matter halo of a given mass contains. HOD is a powerful theoretical frame to populate dark matter halos with luminous galaxies. More specifically, it describes the bias between galaxies and dark matter by specifying (a) the probability P(N|M) that a halo of → virial mass M contains N galaxies of a particular class and (b) the relative spatial and velocity distributions of galaxies and dark matter within halos.

halo; → occupation; → distribution.

halo population
  پُرینش ِ هاله   
porineš-e hâlé

Fr.: population du halo   

Old stars with very low metallicities (→ metallicity) found in the → halo of the Galaxy. Also called → population II star.

halo; → population.

Hamilton's equation
  هموگش ِ هامیلتون   
hamugeš-e Hamilton

Fr.: équation de Hamilton   

One of a set of equations that describe the motion of a → dynamical system in terms of the → Hamiltonian function and the → generalized coordinates. For a → holonomic system with n degrees of freedom, Hamilton's equations are expressed by: q.i = ∂H/∂pi and p.i = - ∂H/∂qi, i = 1, ..., n.

Hamiltonian function; → equation.

Hamilton's principle
  پروز ِ هامیلتون   
parvaz-e Hamilton

Fr.: principe de Hamilton   

Of all the possible paths along which a → dynamical system can move from one configuration to another within a specified time interval (consistent with any constraints), the actual path followed is that which minimizes the time integral of the → Lagrangian function. Hamilton's principle is often mathematically expressed as δ∫Ldt = 0, where L is the Lagrangian function, the integral summed from t1 to t2, and δ denotes the virtual operator of Lagrangian dynamics and the → calculus of variations.

Hamiltonian function; → principle.

Hamiltonian dynamics
  توانیک ِ هامیلتون   
tavânik-e Hamilton

Fr.: dynamique hamiltonienne   

The study of → dynamical systems in terms of the → Hamilton's equations.

Hamiltonian function; → dynamics.

Hamiltonian formalism
  دیسه‌گرایی ِ هامیلتون   
disegerâyi-ye Hamilton

Fr.: formalisme de Hamilton   

A reformulation of classical mechanics that predicts the same outcomes as classical mechanics. → Hamiltonian dynamics.

Hamiltonian; → mechanics.

Hamiltonian function
  کریای ِ هامیلتون   
karyâ-ye Hâmilton

Fr.: fonction de Hamilton   

A function that describes the motion of a → dynamical system in terms of the → Lagrangian function, → generalized coordinates, → generalized momenta, and time. For a → holonomic system having n degrees of freedom, the Hamiltonian function is of the form: H = Σpiq.i - L(qi,q.i,t) (summed from i = 1 to n), where L is the Lagrangian function. If L does not depend explicitly on time, the system is said to be → conservative and H is the total energy of the system. The Hamiltonian function plays a major role in the study of mechanical systems. Also called → Hamiltonian.

Introduced in 1835 by the Irish mathematician and physicist William Rowan Hamilton (1805-1865); → function.

Hamiltonian operator
  آپارگر ِ هامیلتون   
âpârgar-e Hamilton

Fr.: opérateur hamiltonien   

The dynamical operator in → quantum mechanics that corresponds to the → Hamiltonian function in classical mechanics.

Hamiltonian function; → operator.

harmonic
  هماهنگ   
hamâhang (#)

Fr.: harmonique   

(adj.) Of, pertaining to, or noting a series of oscillations in which each oscillation has a frequency that is an integral multiple of the same basic frequency.
(n.) A wave motion, superimposed on a fundamental wave, having a frequency which is an integral multiple of the fundamental frequency. → overtone.

From L. harmonicus, from Gk. harmonikos "harmonic, musical," from harmonia "agreement, concord of sounds," related to harmos "joint," arariskein "to join together;" PIE base *ar- "to fit together."

Hamâhang, "harmonious, concordant," from ham- "together, with; same, equally, even" (Mid.Pers. ham-, like L. com- and Gk. syn- with neither of which it is cognate. O.Pers./Av. ham-; Skt. sam-; also O.Pers./Av. hama- "one and the same," Skt. sama-; Gk. homos-; originally identical with PIE numeral *sam- "one," from *som-) + âhang "melody, pitch, tune; harmony, concord," from Proto-Iranian *āhang-, from prefix ā- + *hang-, from PIE base *sengwh- "to sing, make an incantation;" cf. O.H.G. singan; Ger. singen; Goth. siggwan; Swed. sjunga; O.E. singan "to chant, sing, tell in song;" maybe cognate with Gk. omphe "voice; oracle."

harmonic mean
  میانگین ِ هماهنگ   
miyângin-e hamâhang

Fr.: moyenne harmonique   

A number whose reciprocal is the → arithmetic mean of the reciprocals of a set of numbers. Denoted by H, it may be written in the discrete case for n quantities x1, ..., xn, as: 1/H = (1/n) Σ(1/xi), summing from i = 1 to n. For example, the harmonic mean between 3 and 4 is 24/7 (reciprocal of 3: 1/3, reciprocal of 4: 1/4, arithmetic mean between them 7/24). The harmonic mean applies more accurately to certain situations involving rates. For example, if a car travels a certain distance at a speed speed 60 km/h and then the same distance again at a speed 40 km/h, then its average speed is the harmonic mean of 48 km/h, and its total travel time is the same as if it had traveled the whole distance at that average speed. However, if the car travels for a certain amount of time at a speed v and then the same amount of time at a speed u, then its average speed is the arithmetic mean of v and u, which in the above example is 50 km/h.

harmonic; → mean.

harmonic motion
  جنبش ِ هماهنگ   
jonbeš-e hamâhang (#)

Fr.: mouvement harmonique   

A motion that repeats itself in equal intervals of time (also called periodic motion).

harmonic; → motion.

harmonic oscillator
  نَو ِشگر ِ هماهنگ   
navešgar-e hamâhang (#)

Fr.: oscillateur harmonique   

Any oscillating particle in harmonic motion.

harmonic; → oscillator.

harmonic progression
  فرایازی ِ هماهنگ   
farâyâzi-ye hamâhang

Fr.: progression harmonique   

Math.: Any ordered set of numbers, the reciprocals of which have a constant difference between them. For example 1, ½, 1/3, ¼, ..., 1/n. Also called → harmonic sequence.

harmonic; progression.

harmonic sequence
  پی‌آیه‌ی ِ هماهنگ   
peyâye-ye hamâhang

Fr.: suite harmonique   

harmonic progression.

harmonic; → sequence.

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