An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 3079 Search : on
iteration
  ایترش   
itareš

Fr.: itération   

A computational process involving a succession of approximations, which consists of repeating the operation by inputting the outcome of each preceding operation to improve the final result until a desired accuracy is achieved. Compare → repetition.

Verbal noun of → iterate.

Jablonski diagram
  نمودار ِ یابلونسکی   
nemudâr-e Jablonski

Fr.: diagram de Jablonski   

An energy schematic representing the → electronic states of a → molecule and the → transitions between them. The vertical axis shows energies whereas → energy states are grouped horizontally according to their spin → multiplicity. Radiation-less transitions are symbolized by usual arrows, while → radiative transitions are represented by wavy arrows. The vibrational ground states of each electronic state are indicated with thick lines and the higher → vibrational states with thinner lines.

Named after Aleksander Jablonski (1898-1980), a Polish physicist who was an expert in the field of luminescence and atomic optics; → diagram.

jet propulsion
  پیشرانش ِ شانی   
pišrâneš-e šâni

Fr.: propulsion par réaction   

Powerful, forward thrust that results from the rearward expulsion of a jet of fluid, especially propulsion by jet engines.

jet; → propulsion.

Johnson-Nyquist noise
  نوفه‌ی ِ جانسون-نیکوییست   
nufe-ye Johnson-Nyquist (#)

Fr.: bruit de Johnson-Nyquist   

The random fluctuation of voltage across a resistor caused by the thermal excitation of electrons within it, and the dissipation of power associated with these fluctuations. More generally, an intrinsic noise generated by thermal agitation of electrons by all bodies whose temperature is above 0 K. Also called → thermal noise, Johnson noise, or Nyquist noise.

Named after John Bertrand Johnson (1887-1970) and Harry Nyquist (1889-1976) Swedish-born American engineers and physicists, who did important work on thermal noise and information theory. → noise.

Josephson effect
  ا ُسکر ِ جوزفسون   
oskar-e Josephson

Fr.: effet Josephson   

A quantum mechanical → tunnel effect allowing the flow of a continuous current across two weakly coupled → superconductors which are separated by a very thin insulating barrier.

Named after the British physicist Brian David Josephson, who predicted the existence of the effect in 1962; → effect.

Josephson junction
  جوهه‌ی ِ جوزفسون   
juhe-ye Josephson (#)

Fr.: jonction Josephson   

A type of electronic circuit involving → Josephson effect, capable of switching at very high speeds when operated at temperatures approaching → absolute zero.

Josephson effect; → junction.

Joule's constant
  پایای ِ ژول   
pâyâ-ye Joule (#)

Fr.: constante de Joule   

The proportional relationship of mechanical energy to thermal energy, equal to 4.184 joules per calorie. Also called mechanical equivalent of heat.

joule; → constant.

Joule-Thomson effect
  اسکر ِ ژول-تامسون   
oskar-e Joule-Thomson

Fr.: effet Joule-Thomson   

The change in the temperature of a gas in the → throttling process.

Joule; → Thomson; → effect.

jump conditions
  بوتارهای ِ جهش   
butârhâ-ye jaheš

Fr.: conditions de saut   

Very different values of pressure and density (or temperature or energy) across a shock wave.

jump; → condition.

junction
  جوهش   
juheš

Fr.: jonction   

In a → semiconductor device, a region of transition between semiconducting regions of different electrical properties.

Junction "act of joining," from L. junctionem, noun of action from jungere "to join," cognate with Pers. yuq, juhé, as below; PIE base *yeug- "to join,"

Juheš, from juh, variant of yuq "yoke," Mid.Pers. jug, ayoxtan "to join, yoke;" Av. yaog- "to yoke, put to; to join, unite;" cf. Skt. yugam "yoke;" Hittite yugan "yoke;" Gk. zygon "yoke," zeugnyanai "to join, unite;" L. jungere "to join," as above; O.C.S. igo, O.Welsh iou, Lith. jungas O.E. geoc.

JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE)
  پویشگر ِ مانگهای ِ یخی ِ هرمز   
Puyešgar-e Mânghâ-ye Yaxi-ye Hormoz

Fr.: Jupiter ICy moons Explorer   

An interplanetary mission currently in development by the → European Space Agency planned for launch in 2020. It is aimed mainly at in-depth studies of three potentially ocean-bearing satellites, → Ganymede, → Europa, and → Callisto. JUICE will complete a unique tour of the Jupiter system including several flybys of each planet-sized world, culminating with orbit insertion around Ganymede, the largest moon in the Solar System, followed by nine months of operations in its orbit. JUICE will carry the most powerful scientific payload ever flown to the outer Solar System. It consists of 10 state-of-the-art instruments plus one experiment that uses the spacecraft telecommunication system with ground-based instruments.

Jupiter; → icy; → explorer; → moon.

jurisdiction
  دادبخشان   
dâdbaxšân

Fr.: juridiction   

1) The right, power, or authority to administer justice by hearing and determining controversies.
2) The extent or range of judicial, law enforcement, or other authority.
3) The territory over which authority is exercised (Dictionary.com).

M.E., from O.Fr. juridiccion and directly from L. iurisdictionem "administration of justice, jurisdiction," from ius "right, law," → just, + dictio "a saying; extent or range of administrative power."

Dâdbaxšâ, from dâd, → justice, + baxš "division; donor, distributor, divider," from baxšidan "to divide, distribute, grant," → division, + -ân suffix of attribution and nuance

justification
  راستاورد   
râstâvard

Fr.: justification   

1) A reason, fact, circumstance, or explanation that justifies or defends. What is offered as grounds for believing an assertion.
2) An act of justifying.

Verbal noun of → justify.

Râstâvard, from râst "right, true; just, upright, straight" (Mid.Pers. râst "true, straight, direct;" O.Pers. rāsta- "straight, true," rās- "to be right, straight, true;" Av. rāz- "to direct, put in line, set," razan- "order;" cf. Skt. raj- "to direct, stretch," rjuyant- "walking straight;" Gk. orektos "stretched out;" L. regere "to lead straight, guide, rule," p.p. rectus "right, straight;" Ger. recht; E. right; PIE base *reg- "move in a straight line," hence, "to direct, rule") + âvard past stem of âvardan "to bring; to adduce, bring forward in argument or as evidence" (Mid.Pers. âwurtan, âvaritan; Av. ābar- "to bring; to possess," from prefix ā- + Av./O.Pers. bar- "to bear, carry," bareθre "to bear (infinitive)," bareθri "a female that bears (children), a mother;" Mod.Pers. bordan "to carry;" Skt. bharati "he carries;" Gk. pherein; L. fero "to carry").

K corona
  تاج ِ K   
tâj-e K

Fr.: couronne K   

The inner part of the → solar corona which extends to about two solar radii. It is due to the → Thomson scattering of light from the → photosphere by the free electrons in the corona. The K corona exhibits a → linearly polarized continuous spectrum. The high speeds of the scattering electrons (on the average 10,000 km s-1 for a temperature of 2 million K) smear out the → Fraunhofer lines except the → H and K lines.

K from Ger. Kontinuum, → continuum; → corona.

K correction
  ارشایش ِ K   
aršâyeš-e K

Fr.: correction K   

A → color index correction applied to the photometric magnitudes and colors of a distant galaxy to compensate for the "reddening" of the galaxy due to → cosmological redshift. K correction is intended to derive the magnitudes in the → rest frame of the galaxy. Typically it is given as K(z) = az + bz2, where a and b depend on galaxy types. Conversely, one may deduce the redshift of a galaxy by its colors and a K-correction model.

The term K correction, probably stems from the K-term used by C. W. Wirtz (1918, Astron. Nachr. 206, 109), where K stands for Konstante, the German word for constant. The K-term was a constant offset in the redshift applied to diffuse nebulae in that epoch (source: A. L. Kinney, 1996, ApJ 467, 38); → correction.

K2 mission
  گسیلان ِ K2   
gosilân-e K2

Fr.: mission K2   

A follow-up mission of the → Kepler satellite funded by → NASA. K2 provides an opportunity to continue Kepler's observations in the field of → exoplanets and expand its role into new astrophysical observations by assigning to Kepler new mission.

K, short for → Kepler spacecraft; 2, for second → mission.

kaon
  کاءون   
kâon

Fr.: kaon   

Any of a group of four short-lived → mesons distinguished by a → quantum number called → strangeness. Also called K meson and denoted K. They are positive, negative, or neutral and have a mass of about 495 MeV/c (about 970 times that of an → electron).

Kaon, from ka (for the letter K) + (mes)on, → meson.

Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction
  ترنگش ِ کلوین-هلمهولتس   
terengeš-e Kelvin-Helmholtz

Fr.: contraction de Kelvin-Helmholtz   

The contraction of a volume of gas under its → gravity, accompanied by the → radiation of the lost → potential energy as → heat.

After the Scottish physicist William Thomson, also known as Lord Kelvin (1824-1907) and the German physicist and physician Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (1821-1894), who made important contributions to the thermodynamics of gaseous systems; → contraction.

Kepler's equation
  هموگش ِ کپلر   
hamugeš-e Kepler

Fr.: équation de Kepler   

An equation that enables the position of a body in an elliptical orbit to be calculated at any given time from its orbital elements. It relates the → mean anomaly of the body to its → eccentric anomaly.

Keplerian, adj. of → Kepler; → equation.

Kepler's second law
  قانون ِ دوم ِ کپلر   
qânun-e dovom-e Kepler (#)

Fr.: deuxième loi de Kepler   

A line joining a planet to the Sun sweeps out equal areas in equal intervals of time (year 1609).

Kepler; → second; → law.

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