An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
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فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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Number of Results: 3079 Search : on
gravitational potential energy
  کاروژ ِ توند ِ گرانشی   
kâruž-e tavand-e gerâneši

Fr.: énergie potentielle gravitationnelle   

1) The energy that an object possesses because of its position in a → gravitational field, especially an object near the surface of the Earth where the → gravitational acceleration can be assumed to be constant, at about 9.8 m s-2.
2) In a two body system. It is the amount of work done in bringing the mass m to the distance R from M: EP = -GMm/R, where G is the → gravitational constant.
3) For a uniform sphere. It is EP = -(3/5)GM2/R, where G is the gravitational constant and M is the mass contained in the sphere of radius R.

gravitational; → potential; → energy.

gravitational radiation
  تابش ِ گرانشی   
tâbeš-e gerâneši (#)

Fr.: rayonnement gravitationnel   

The → energy transported by → gravitational waves. Gravitational radiation is to → gravity what light is to → electromagnetism.

gravitational; → radiation.

gravitational redshift
  سرخ‌کیب ِ گرانشی   
sorxkib-e gerâneši

Fr.: décalage vers le rouge gravitationnel   

The change in the wavelength or frequency of electromagnetic radiation in a gravitational field predicted by general relativity.

gravitational; → redshift.

gravitational settling
  نیاشش ِ گرانشی   
niyâšeš-e gerâneši

Fr.: décantation par gravité   

A physical process occurring in → stellar atmospheres whereby in a very stable atmosphere → heavy elements are gravitationally pulled down preferentially. If such an atmosphere is stable for long periods of time, the → absorption lines of heavy elements may therefore become very weak. Observationally, the star seems to contain only → hydrogen and → helium. Gravitational settling takes place in the Sun at the bottom of the outer → convective zone where helium is dragged down, leading to a surface He abundant smaller than the cosmic value. It occurs also in the atmospheres of → brown dwarfs and → planets. See also → radiative levitation, → element diffusion, → thermal diffusion.

gravitational; → settling.

gravitational slingshot
  فلاخن ِ گرانشی   
falâxan-e gerâneši

Fr.: fronde gravitationnelle   

Same as → gravity assist.

gravitational; slingshot, from sling, from M.E. slyngen, from O.N. slyngva "to sling, fling" + shot, from M.E., from O.E. sc(e)ot, (ge)sceot; cf. Ger. Schoss, Geschoss.

Falâxan "sling;" from Av. fradaxšana- "sling," fradaxšanya- "sling, sling-stone;" → gravitational.

gravitational wave
  موج ِ گرانشی   
mowj-e gerâneši (#)

Fr.: ondes gravitationnelles   

A → space-time oscillation created by the motion of matter, as predicted by Einstein's → general relativity. When an object accelerates, it creates ripples in space-time, just like a boat causes ripples in a lake. Gravitational waves are extremely weak even for the most massive objects like → supermassive black holes. They had been inferred from observing a → binary pulsar in which the components slow down, due to losing energy from emitting gravitational waves. Gravitational waves were directly detected for the first time on September 14, 2015 by the → Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) (Abbott et al., 2016, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102). Since then several other events have been detected by LIGO and → Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). The Nobel Prize in physics 2017 was awarded to three physicists who had leading roles in the first detection of gravitational waves using LIGO. They were Rainer Weiss (MIT), Barry C. Barish, and Kip S. Thorne (both Caltech).
2) Not to be confounded with → gravity wave.

gravitational; → wave.

gravitational-field theory
  نگره‌ی ِ میدان ِ گرانشی   
negare-ye meydân-e gerâneši (#)

Fr.: théorie de champ gravitationnel   

A theory that treats gravity as a field rather than a force acting at a distance.

gravitational; → field.

gravitationally bound
  گرانشانه بندیده   
gerânešâné bandidé

Fr.: gravitationnellement lié   

Objects held in orbit about each other by their → gravitational attraction. Such objects are part of a → bound system.

gravitational; → bound.

graviton
  گراویتون   
gerâviton (#)

Fr.: graviton   

A hypothetical elementary particle associated with the gravitational interactions. This quantum of gravitational radiation is a stable particle, which travels with the speed of light, and has zero rest mass, zero charge, and a spin of ± 2.

From gravit(y), → gravity + → -on a suffix used in the names of subatomic particles.

gravity darkening exponent
  نمای ِ تاریکش ِ گرانشی   
nemâ-ye târikeš-e gerâneši

Fr.: exposant de l'assombrissement gravitationnel   

The exponent appearing in the power law that describes the → effective temperature of a → rotating star as a function of the → effective gravity, as deduced from the → von Zeipel theorem or law. Generalizing this law, the effective temperature is usually expressed as Teff∝ geffβ, where β is the gravity darkening exponent with a value of 0.25. It has, however, been shown that the relation between the effective temperature and gravity is not exactly a power law. Moreover, the value of β = 0.25 is appropriate only in the limit of slow rotators and is smaller for fast rotating stars (Espinosa Lara & Rieutord, 2011, A&A 533, A43).

gravity; → darkening; → exponent.

grazing occultation
  فروپوشانش ِ برمژنده   
forupušâneš-e barmažandé

Fr.: occultation rasante   

A special type of occultation that occurs when the star appears to pass tangentially on the → edge of the → Moon.

grazing; → occultation.

greatest eastern elongation
  بزرگترین درازش ِ خاوری   
bozorgtarin derâzeš-e xâvari

Fr.: plus grande élongation est   

The Greatest → elongation of an inferior planet occurring after sunset.

Superlative of → great; → eastern; → elongation.

greatest elongation
  بزرگترین درازش   
bozorgtarin derâzeš

Fr.: plus grande élongationt   

The largest → elongation of an inferior planet from the Sun. It may be → greatest eastern elongation or → greatest western elongation. The greatest elongation of Mercury is about 28°, and thus Mercury can only be observed 112 minutes after sunset or before sunrise. For Venus, it is about 47°, making it visible at most about 3 hours after sunset or before sunrise.

Superlative of → great; → eastern; → elongation.

greatest western elongation
  بزرگترین درازش ِ باختری   
bozorgtarin derâzeš-e bâxtari

Fr.: plus grande élongation ouest   

The Greatest → elongation of an inferior planet occurring before sunrise.

Superlative of → great; → western; → elongation.

ground-based observation
  نپاهش از زمین   
nepâheš az zamin

Fr.: observation au sol   

An astronomical observation carried out using a telescope on Earth, as opposed to that from an orbiting satellite.

ground; based, adj. of base, from O.Fr. bas, from L. basis "foundation," from Gk. basis "step, pedestal," from bainein "to step;" → observation.

Nepâheš, → observation; az "from," → ex-; zamin, → ground.

Gunn-Peterson effect
  ا ُسکر ِ گان-پیترسون   
oskar-e Gunn-Peterson

Fr.: effet Gunn-Peterson   

The continuum trough observed in the spectra of high redshift quasars (z> 6) at the blue wing of their Lyman-alpha emission line (1216 Å). It is explained by the scattering of the radiation of the quasar by intergalactic neutral hydrogen on the line of sight. Because of the cosmological expansion, the quasar line is redshifted with respect to the continuum trough. The Gunn-Peterson opacity increases rapidly with redshift. It is interpreted as a strong evidence for the reionization of the Universe around z = 6.

After James E. Gunn and Bruce A. Peterson who predicted the effect in 1965; → effect.

H I region
  ناحیه‌ی ِ H I   
nâhiye-ye H I

Fr.: région H I   

A region of neutral (atomic) hydrogen in interstellar space. At least 95 percent of interstellar hydrogen is H I. It emits radio waves that are 21 cm long.

H I; → region

H II region
  ناحیه‌ی ِ H II   
nâhiye-ye H II

Fr.: région H II   

A type of → emission nebulae composed of very hot gas (about 104 K), mainly ionized hydrogen, created by the ultraviolet radiation of → massive stars. H II regions originate when O or early-type stars, born in → giant molecular clouds, start heating up the cold gas, causing it to become → ionized and "glow". The effective temperatures of the → exciting stars are in the range 3 x 104 to 5 x 104 K, and throughout the nebula hydrogen is ionized. Helium is → singly ionized, and other elements are mostly singly or → doubly ionized. Typical densities in the H II region are of the order 10 to 102 cm-3, ranging as high as 104 cm-3. Internal motions occur in the gas with velocities of order 10 km s-1. The spectra of H II regions are mainly composed of strong → H Irecombination lines and → forbidden lines such as [O III], [O II], [N II]. See also → ionization-bounded H II region; → density-bounded H II region; → compact H II region; → ultracompact H II region.

H II; → region

H II region luminosity
  تابندگی ِ ناحیه‌ی ِ H II   
tâbandegi-ye nâhiye-ye H II

Fr.: luminosité de région H II   

The total number of → Lyman continuum photons emitted by an → H II region. It is usually derived using → radio continuum observations which are less affected by → interstellar extinction. The measured value is often a lower limit because of photon leakage from the H II region and absorption. See also → density-bounded H II region.

H II; → region; → luminosity.

habitable zone (HZ)
  زُنار ِ زیست‌پذیر   
zonâr-e zistpazir

Fr.: zone habitable   

A zone around a → star where the → temperature would be in the range 0-100 °C to sustain → liquid water on the surface of rocky planets (or sufficiently large moons). Water is thought to be a necessary component to the → formation and evolution of Earth-type life. This zone depends on the parent star's luminosity and distance; it will be farther from hotter stars. A more accurate definition of HZ needs to include other factors, such as orbital → eccentricity, heat sources other than stellar irradiation, and atmospheric properties. Same as → circumstellar habitable zone; → ecosphere.

habitable; → zone.

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