An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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mathematical conjecture
  هاشن ِ مزداهیک   
hâšan-e mazdâhik

Fr.: conjecture mathématique   

A statement that one expects to be true, but for which one does not yet know a proof. Once the → proof is found, the conjecture becomes a → theorem.

mathematical; → conjecture.

mathematical expectation
  امید ِ مزداهیک، بیوسش ِ ~، ~ ِ ریاضی   
omid-e mazdâhik, bayuseš-e ~, ~ riyâzi

Fr.: espérance mathématique   

In probability and statistics, of a random variable, the summation or integration, over all values of the random variable, of the product of the value and its probability of occurrence. Also called → expectation, → expected value.

mathematical; → expectation.

Maxwell's demon
  پری ِ ماکسول   
pari-ye Maxwell

Fr.: démon de Maxwell   

A → thought experiment meant to raise questions about the possibility of violating the → second law of thermodynamics. A wall separates two compartments filled with gas. A little "demon" sits by a tiny trap door in the wall. He is able to sort hot (faster) molecules from cold molecules without expending energy, thus bringing about a general decrease in → entropy and violating the second law of thermodynamics. The → paradox is explained by the fact that such a demon would still need to use energy to observe and sort the molecules. Thus the total entropy of the system still increases.

Named after James Clerk Maxwell (→ maxwell), who first thought of this experiment; → demon.

Maxwell's equations
  هموگش‌های ِ ماکسول   
hamugešhâ-ye Maxwell

Fr.: équations de Maxwell   

A set of four fundamental equations that describe the electric and magnetic fields arising from varying electric charges and magnetic fields, electric currents, charge distributions, and how those fields change in time. In their vector differential form, these equations are:
i) ∇.E = ρ/ε0 (→ Gauss's law for electricity),
ii) ∇.B = 0 (→ Gauss's law for magnetism),
iii) x E = -∂B/∂t (→ Faraday's law of induction),
iv) x B = μ0J + μ0ε0E/∂t (→ Ampere's law), with c2 = 1/(μ0ε0), where E is → electric intensity, B is → magnetic flux density, ρ is → charge density, ε0 is → permittivity, μ0 is → permeability, J is → current density, and c is → speed of light.

maxwell. It should be emphasized that the equations originally published by James Clerk Maxwell in 1873 (in A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism) were 20 in number, had 20 variables, and were in scalar form. The German physicist Heinrich Rudolf Hertz (1857-1894) reduced them to 12 scalar equations (1884). It was the English mathematician/physicist Oliver Heaviside (1850-1925) who expressed Maxwell's equations in vector form using the notations of → gradient, → divergence, and → curl of a vector, thus simplifying them to the present 4 equations (1886). Before Einstein these equations were known as Maxwell-Heaviside-Hertz equations, Einstein (1940) popularized the name "Maxwell's Equations;" → equation.

Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution
  واباژش ِ ماکسول-بولتسمان   
vibâžš-e Maxwell-Boltzmann

Fr.: distribution de Maxwell-Boltzmann   

The distribution law for kinetic energies (or, equivalently, speeds) of molecules of an ideal gas in equilibrium at a given temperature.

maxwell; → Boltzmann's constant; → distribution.

mean daily motion
  جنبش ِ روزانه‌ی ِ میانگین   
jenbeš-e ruzâne-ye miyângin (#)

Fr.: mouvement diurne moyen   

The average movement of a body along its orbit in one day, usually expressed in degrees.

mean; → diurnal; → motion.

mean moon
  ماه ِ میانگین   
mâh-e miyângin (#)

Fr.: lune moyenne   

A fictitious Moon that has the same average motion as the true Moon but that is not subject to any gravitational perturbations by other bodies.

mean; → moon.

mean motion
  جنبش ِ میانگین   
jonbeš-e miyângin (#)

Fr.: mouvement moyen   

The average angular velocity of a satellite in an elliptical orbit.

mean; → motion.

mean position
  نهش ِ میانگین   
neheš-e miyângin

Fr.: position moyenne   

Same as → mean place.

mean; → position.

meditation
  سگالش   
segâleš (#)

Fr.: méditation   

The act of meditating. → consideration.

From L. meditatatus p.p. of meditari "to think over, reflect, consider," from PIE root *med- "to measure, limit, consider, advise," → mode.

Verbal noun of → meditate.

megatons of TNT
  مگاتن ِ TNT   
megâton-e TNT (#)

Fr.: megatonnes de TNT   

A unit of explosive force equal to one million metric tons of → T.N.T.. 1 megaton = 4.2 × 1022 → ergs = 4.2 × 1015 → joules.

mega-; → ton.

membership function
  کریای ِ هموندی   
karyâ-ye hamvandi

Fr.: fonction d'adhésion   

One of several functions used in the → fuzzification and → defuzzification steps of a → fuzzy logic system to map the → nonfuzzy input values to → fuzzy linguistic terms and vice versa. A membership function is used to quantify a linguistic term.

membership; → function.

mention
  ۱) ایات؛ ۲) ایاتیدن   
1) ayât; 2) ayâtidan

Fr.: 1) mentionner; 2) mention   

1) To refer briefly to; name, specify, or speak of (Dictionary.com).
2) A direct or incidental reference; a mentioning (Dictionary.com).

M.E. mencioun, from O.Fr. mencion "mention, memory, speech," from L. mentionem "a calling to mind, a speaking of," from root of Old L. minisci "to think," related to mens "mind," from PIE root *men- "to think;" cf. Pers. man, mân "thought, to think," → mind.

Ayât, from Mid.Pers. ayât, ayâd "remembrance, recollection, memory;" Mod.Pers. yâd.

meridian observation
  نپاهش ِ نیمروزانی   
nepâheš-e nimruzâni

Fr.: observation au méridien   

The observation of a star when it crosses an observer's meridian.

meridian; → observation.

meridional
  نیمروزانی   
nimruzâni

Fr.: méridien   

Of, pertaining to, or resembling a meridian.

meridian + → -al.

From nimruzân, → meridian, + -i adj. suffix.

meridional circulation
  پرهونش ِ نیمروزانی   
parhuneš-e nimruzâni

Fr.: circulation méridien   

The mass motion of material within a → rotating star generated by the star's departure from spherical symmetry. For a rotating star in which → centrifugal forces are not negligible, → radiative equilibrium and → hydrostatic equilibrium cannot be satisfied. In this condition energy transfer is accomplished by means of the physical motion of material. According to → von Zeipel theorem, the heating on an → equipotential surface is generally higher in the polar direction than in the equatorial direction, which drives a large scale circulation current rising at the pole and descending at the equator. As a consequence, → mixing of material takes place in the stellar interior; see also → Eddington-Sweet time scale. The meridional circulation plays an important role in the evolution of → massive stars. The circulation current was first suggested by Arthur S. Eddington in 1926 (The Internal Constitution of the Stars, Dover Pub. Inc., New York) and subsequently quantified by P. A. Sweet (1950, MNRAS 110, 548).

meridional; → circulation.

meridional flow
  تچان ِ نیمروزانی   
tacân-e nimruzâni

Fr.: courant méridien   

Meteo.: A flow between the poles, or between the equator and the poles. A positive value indicates flow away from the equator; a negative value, flow toward the equator.

meridional; → flow.

meridional magnetic field
  میدان ِ مغناتیسی ِ نیمروزانی   
meydân-e meqnâtisi-ye nimruzâni

Fr.: champ magnétiquue méridien   

In the → solar dynamo model, a magnetic field that points from the north to south or south to north.

meridional; → magnetic; → field.

meson
  مسون   
meson

Fr.: méson   

A nuclear particle with a mass intermediate between that of a proton and an electron, which is believed to be responsible for the strong nuclear force. In contrast to the case of baryons or leptons, meson number is not conserved: like photons, mesons can be created or destroyed in arbitrary numbers. Their charge can be positive, negative, or zero.

From mes-, meso-, from Gk. mesos "middle," akin to L. medius, Pers. miyân, → medium, → middle, + -on a suffix used in the names of subatomic particles.

metal-rich environment
  پرگیر ِ پرفلز   
pargir-e porfelez

Fr.: environnement riche en métaux   

An environment (→ galaxy, → nebula) whose → metallicity is larger than that of the → Milky Way galaxy.

metal; → rich; → environment.

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