An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
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فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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<< < -es -iv -ti 21 a p abe abs abs aca acc acc acr act ada adh Adr aer AGB air Alf Alg all alp alt AM amo ana And ang ani ano Ant Ant apa apo app app Ara Arc ari Arr ash ass ast ast asy atm ato att aut ave axi Bab bal Bal bar bar bea Bek Bes bia Big bin bin bip biv bla bli blu Boh Bol Bos bou bra bri bro buo cal cal can cap car Car cat cat CCD Cen cen CH cha cha che Che chr cir cir cit cla clo clo clu Coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com Com con con con con con con con con con con con con Cop Cor cor cor cos cos cou cou Cow cre cri cro cry cur cya Cyg dan dar dat de- deb dec dec ded def deg del dem den dep des det dev dia dif dif dih dio Dir dis dis dis dis dis dis DO don dou dow dro dur dwa dyn Dys ear ebb ecl edg egg Ein Ela ele ele ele ele ell eme emp enc eng ent epi equ equ equ esc eth Eur Eve exa exc exe exi exp exp ext ext ext fac fal far fed Fer fer fie fin fir fis fla flo flu fol for for fou fra fre Fre fro fut G-t gal gal gam gas Gau Gem gen geo geo geo gia Gli Gol gra gra gra gra gre gri gui H I Hag hal har hat He- hea hel Hel her Hes hie hig his hom hor hot Hub Hug hur hyd hyd hyg hyp ice ide ima Ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf ing inn ins ins int int int int int int int int inv Io ion iro isl iso iso Jac jet jud jur Kel Kep kil Klo Kui Lag lam Lap Lar lat law lea len lep Lib lig lim lin lin Lio lit loc LOF lon Lor low lum lun Lup Lyo mac mag mag mag mag mag mai man Mar mas mas mat Max mea mec Meg Mer Mer met met Met mic Mid Mil min Mir mit mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul mul mys nan Nat nau nec neo neu nev New NGC no nom non non nor not nuc nuc num nut obj obs obs occ ocu oft ome Oor ope opp opt opt orb ord ori ort osc out ove oxi pai pan par par par par pas pea pen per per per per Per per pha phi pho pho pho phy pio Pla pla pla pla Pla plu Poi pol pol pol poo pos pos pot pra pre pre pre pre pri pri pro pro pro pro pro Pro pro pse pul pur qua qua qua qua que rac rad rad rad rad rad rad ran rar ray rea rea rec rec red red ref ref reg rel rel rel ren res res res res ret rev Ric rig rin roc roo rot rot Rus Sac sal sat sca sca Sch sci Scu sec sec Sed sel Sel sen ser Sex Sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin siz sla Sma sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spi spr squ sta sta sta sta ste ste ste Sto Str str str sub sub suc sun sup sup sup sup sur swa syn syn tab tar tek tem ter tes the the the the Tho thr tid tim Tis Too Tor tra tra Tra tra tra tri tri tru Tul tur two Typ ult un- und uni uni unk upp Urc utt val var vec vel ver vib vio vir vis voi vor wan wat wav wax wea Wei whi Wil win WN9 wor X-r yel you zer zod > >>

Number of Results: 13048 Search : far
Larson relation
  بازانش ِ لرسون   
bâzâneš-e Larson

Fr.: relation de Larson   

An → empirical relationship between the internal → velocity dispersion of → molecular clouds and their size. The velocity dispersions are derived from molecular → linewidths, in particular those of → carbon monoxide. It was first established on star forming regions and found to be: σ (km s-1) = 1.10 L (pc)0.38, where σ is the velocity dispersion and L the size. The relation holds for 0.1 ≤ L ≤ 100 pc. More recent set of cloud data yield: σ (km s-1) = L (pc)0.5. This relation indicates that larger molecular clouds have larger internal velocity dispersions. It is usually interpreted as evidence for → turbulence in molecular clouds. Possible sources of interstellar turbulence include the following processes operating at various scales: galactic-scale (→ differential rotation, → infall of extragalactic gas on the galaxy), intermediate-scale (expansion of → supernova remnants, → shocks, → stellar winds from → massive stars), and smaller-scale processes (→ outflows from → young stellar objects).

First derived by Richard B. Larson, American astrophysicist working at Yale University (Larson, 1981, MNRAS 194, 809). See Falgarone et al. (2009, A&A 507, 355) for a recent study; → relation.

Larson-Penston solution
  لویش ِ لرسون-پنستون   
luyeš-e Larson-Penston

Fr.: solution de Larson-Penston   

The analytical solution to the → hydrodynamic equations describing the → collapse of an → isothermal sphere. The Larson-Penston solution is → self-similar for a purely dynamical isothermal collapse with spherical symmetry. It corresponds to the collapse prior to the formation of a → protostar, and thus is suitable for the study of → pre-stellar cores. The Larson-Penston solution was extended by Shu (1977) to obtain a whole family of solutions for this problem.

Named after R. B. Larson (1969, MNRAS 145, 271) and M. V. Penston (1969, MNRAS 144, 425), who simultaneously, but independently, did this study.

laryngeal
  حنجره‌ای   
hanjare-yi (#)

Fr.: laryngé   

1) Of, pertaining to, or located in the larynx.
2) Phonetics: articulated in the larynx (Dictionary.com).

larynx; → -al.

laryngeal consonant
  هم‌آوای ِ حنجره‌ای   
hamâvâ-ye hanjare-yi

Fr.: son laryngé   

A consonant generated in the → larynx with the → vocal cords partly closed and partly vibrating. It is hypothesized that the → Proto-Indo-European language contained some laryngeal consonants (denoted by H).

laryngeal; → consonant.

larynx
  حنجره   
hanjaré (#)

Fr.: larynge   

A muscular and cartilaginous structure lined with mucous membrane at the upper part of the → trachea in humans, in which the → vocal cords are located (Dictionary.com).

From M.Fr. larynx, from M.L. from Gk. larynx (genitive laryngos) "the upper windpipe," probably from laimos "throat," influenced by pharynx "throat, windpipe."

Hanjaré, from Ar. Hanjarah.

laser
  لیزر   
leyzer (#)

Fr.: laser   

1) A device that generates an intense directional beam of → monochromatic and → coherent light by exciting atoms to a higher energy level and causing them to radiate their energy in phase. The high degree of collimation arises from the fact that excited atoms are are situated in a cavity bounded by two parallel front and back mirrors. A first photon stimulates an atom which emits a second photon, and so on thanks to the mirrors. The resulting photons are all identical. They have the same energy which gives them the same color and a unique direction. The first working laser, a pulsed ruby device, was developed by T. Maiman in 1959. See also → gas laser, → stimulated emission; → maser.
2) The light produced in this way.

Acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, on pattern of → maser.

laser cooling technique
  تشنیک ِ سردش ِ لیزری   
tašnik-e sardeš-e leyzeri

Fr.: technique de refroidissement par laser   

A technique that uses a suitable arrangement of → laser beams and magnetic fields to capture → cesium (133Cs) atoms from a thermal vapor and slow the motion of the atoms, cooling them to just a few micro-kelvins above the → absolute zero. The technique allows trapping some 107 cesium atoms in a cloud a few millimeters in diameter in a few tenths of a second. At a temperature of 2 μK, the average thermal velocity of the cesium atoms is of the order of 1 cm s-1, so they stay together for a relatively long time. The laser cooling technique is the key tool which enabled the operation of an → atomic fountain clock.

laser; → cooling; → technique.

laser interferometer
  اندرزنش‌سنج ِ لیزری   
andarzaneš-sanj-e leyzeri

Fr.: interféromètre laser   

An optical instrument using laser → beams to form → interference pattern. There are two types of laser interferometers: → homodyne and → heterodyne. A homodyne interferometer, like → Michelson interferometer, uses a single-frequency laser source. A → heterodyne interferometer uses a laser source with two close frequencies.

laser; → interferometer.

Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)
  نپاهشگاه ِ موجهای ِ گرانشی با اندرزنش‌سنجی ِ لیزری   
nepâhešgâh-e mowjhâ-ye gerâneši bâ andarzaneš-sanji-ye leyzeri

Fr.: Observatoire d'ondes gravitationnelles par interférométrie laser   

A facility dedicated to the detection and measurement of cosmic → gravitational waves. It consists of two widely separated installations, or detectors, within the United States, operated in unison as a single observatory. One installation is located in Hanford (Washington) and the other in Livingston (Louisiana), 3,000 km apart. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), LIGO was designed and constructed by a team of scientists from the California Institute of Technology, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and by industrial contractors. Construction of the facilities was completed in 1999. Initial operation of the detectors began in 2001. Each LIGO detector beams laser light down arms 4 km long, which are arranged in the shape of an "L." If a gravitational wave passes through the detector system, the distance traveled by the laser beam changes by a minuscule amount -- less than one-thousandth of the size of an atomic nucleus (10-18 m). Still, LIGO should be able to pick this difference up. LIGO directly detected gravitational waves for the first time from a binary → black hole merger (GW150914) on September 14, 2015 (Abbott et al., 2016, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102). The Nobel Prize in physics 2017 was awarded to three physicists (Rainer Weiss, Barry C. Barish, and Kip S. Thorne) for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves. LIGO had a prominent role in the detection of → GW170817, the first event with an → electromagnetic counterpart.

laser; → interferometer; → gravitational; → wave; → observatory.

Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA)
  آنتن ِ فضایی ِ اندرزنش‌سنج ِ لیزری   
ânten-e fezâyi-e andarzanešsanj-e leyzeri

Fr.: Observatoire d'ondes gravitationnelles par interférométrie laser   

A collaborative project between → NASA and → ESA to develop and operate a space-based gravitational wave detector sensitive at frequencies between 0.03 mHz and 0.1 Hz. LISA detects gravitational-wave induced strains in → space-time by measuring changes of the separation between fiducial masses in three spacecraft 5 million km apart. Ultimately, NASA and ESA decided in 2011 not to proceed with the mission. LISA was not the highest ranked mission in the 2010 Decadal Survey and funding constraints prevented NASA from proceeding with multiple large missions (http://lisa.nasa.gov). → LISA pathfinder.

laser; → interferometer; → space; → antenna.

last
  واپسین   
vâpasin (#)

Fr.: dernier   

Occurring or coming after all others, as in time, order, or place. → last contact, → last quarter

Last, from O.E. latost (adj.) and lætest (adv.), superlative of læt (adj.) and late (adv.); cognate with O.Fris. lest, Du. laatst, O.H.G. laggost, Ger. letzt.

Vâpasin, from vâ-, as intensive prefix, → de-, + pasin, from pas "after, afterward, behind; finally, at last" (Mid.Pers. pas "behind, before, after;" O.Pers. pasā "after;" Av. pasca "behind (of space); then, afterward (of time);" cf. Skt. pazca "behind, after, later;" L. post "behind, in the rear; after, afterward;" O.C.S. po "behind, after;" Lith. pas "at, by;" PIE base *pos-, *posko-) + -in superlative suffix.

last (v.)
  پاییدن   
pâyidan

Fr.: durer   

To continue in time; go on; endure.

M.E. lasten, from O.E. læstan "to continue, endure;" cf. Goth. laistjan "to follow after," Ger. leisten "to perform, achieve,"), from PIE root *lois- "furrow, track."

Pâyidan "to watch, observe; remain or continue in existence, last," variants pâsidan, pâhidan; Mid.Pers. pây- "to protect, guard;" Sogdian p'y "to observe, protect, watch over;" O.Pers. pā- "to protect," pāta- "protected;" Av. pā- "to protect," pāti "guards," nipā(y)- (with ni-) "to watch, observe, guard," nipātar- "protector, watcher," nipāθri- "protectress;" cf. Skt. pā- "to protect, keep," tanû.pā- "protecting the body," paś.pā- "shepherd;" Gk. poma "lid, cover," poimen "shepherd;" L. pascere "to put out to graze," pastor "shepherd;" Lith. piemuo "shepherd;" PIE base *pā- "to protect, feed."

last contact
  پرماس ِ واپسین   
parmâs-e vâpasin

Fr.: dernier contact   

Same as → fourth contact at an eclipse.

last; → contact.

last quarter
  چارک ِ واپسین   
cârak-e vâpasin

Fr.: dernier quartier   

One of the phases of the Moon that appears when it is 90 degrees west of the Sun. Approximately one week after a full moon, when half of the Moon's disk is illuminated by the Sun. → first quarter.

last; → quarter.

last scattering
  واپسین پراکنش   
vâpasin parâkaneš

Fr.: dernière diffusion   

The epoch in the early evolution of the Universe when matter and photons decoupled. Once atoms formed, light and matter stopped constantly interacting with one another, and photons were able to travel freely. As a result, the Universe became transparent. Light from this period is observed today as the → cosmic microwave background radiation. Same as → decoupling era and → recombination era.

last; → scattering.

last scattering surface
  رویه‌ی ِ واپسین پراکنش   
ruye-ye vâpasin parâkaneš

Fr.: surface de dernière diffusion   

The set of locations in space corresponding to the → last scattering epoch in the early Universe. It is a spherical surface around the present-day observer from which the → cosmic microwave background radiation appears to emanate.

last; → scattering; → surface.

last-born
  دمازا   
demâzâ

Fr.: dernier né   

Last in order of birth; youngest.

last; → born.

Demâzâ, from Lori, Laki demâzâ, from demâ "last, end, back," related to dom, → tail, + contraction of zâd, → born.

lasting
  پاینده   
pâyande

Fr.: durable   

Continuing or remaining for a long time; enduring.

last; → -ing.

late
  ۱) دیر؛ ۲) دیران   
1) dir (#); 2) dirân

Fr.: tardif; tard; avancé   

1) Happening or arriving after an expected or arranged time; not on time, beyond usual time.
2) Belonging to an advanced stage or period in the development of something. → Late Heavy Bombardment, → late helium flash, → late thermal pulse, → late-type galaxy, → late-type star.

M.E., from O.E. læt "slow, late;" cf. Ger. lass "slothful;" O.N. latr, Goth. lats "slow, lazy;" L. lassus "tired, faint;" Gk. ledein "to be weary."

Dir "late; tardily, slowly; a long while; old, antique," from Mid.Pers. dêr, variants dagr, drâz "long" (Mod.Pers. derâz "long," variant Laki, Kurdi derež); O.Pers. darga- "long;" Av. darəga-, darəγa- "long," drājištəm "longest;" cf. Skt. dirghá- "long (in space and time);" L. longus "long;" Gk. dolikhos "elongated;" O.H.G., Ger. lang; Goth. laggs "long;" PIE base *dlonghos- "long."
Dirân, adjective, variant of dir, as above.

Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB)
  بمباران ِ سنگین ِ دیران   
bombârân-e sangin-e dirân

Fr.: Grand Bombardement Tardif   

A cataclysmic event in the history of the → solar system, estimated to have occurred 3.9 billion years ago (about 600 million years after the formation of the → terrestrial planets) during which → asteroid and → comet impacts with Earth were some 20,000 times more frequent than today. It is estimated that during this period the terrestrial planets were bombarded with an object 1 km in size every 20 years. This hypothetical event lasted 50 to 150 million years. Several explanations have been put forward, among which the occurrence of an instability in the outer solar system which caused → orbital migration of small bodies from the → Kuiper belt inward.

late, with respect to the formation time of the planets; → heavy; bombardment, noun from bombard, from Fr. bombarder, from bombarde "mortar, catapult" from bombe, from It. bomba, probably from L. bombus "a booming sound," from Gk. bombos "deep and hollow sound."

<< < -es -iv -ti 21 a p abe abs abs aca acc acc acr act ada adh Adr aer AGB air Alf Alg all alp alt AM amo ana And ang ani ano Ant Ant apa apo app app Ara Arc ari Arr ash ass ast ast asy atm ato att aut ave axi Bab bal Bal bar bar bea Bek Bes bia Big bin bin bip biv bla bli blu Boh Bol Bos bou bra bri bro buo cal cal can cap car Car cat cat CCD Cen cen CH cha cha che Che chr cir cir cit cla clo clo clu Coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com Com con con con con con con con con con con con con Cop Cor cor cor cos cos cou cou Cow cre cri cro cry cur cya Cyg dan dar dat de- deb dec dec ded def deg del dem den dep des det dev dia dif dif dih dio Dir dis dis dis dis dis dis DO don dou dow dro dur dwa dyn Dys ear ebb ecl edg egg Ein Ela ele ele ele ele ell eme emp enc eng ent epi equ equ equ esc eth Eur Eve exa exc exe exi exp exp ext ext ext fac fal far fed Fer fer fie fin fir fis fla flo flu fol for for fou fra fre Fre fro fut G-t gal gal gam gas Gau Gem gen geo geo geo gia Gli Gol gra gra gra gra gre gri gui H I Hag hal har hat He- hea hel Hel her Hes hie hig his hom hor hot Hub Hug hur hyd hyd hyg hyp ice ide ima Ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf ing inn ins ins int int int int int int int int inv Io ion iro isl iso iso Jac jet jud jur Kel Kep kil Klo Kui Lag lam Lap Lar lat law lea len lep Lib lig lim lin lin Lio lit loc LOF lon Lor low lum lun Lup Lyo mac mag mag mag mag mag mai man Mar mas mas mat Max mea mec Meg Mer Mer met met Met mic Mid Mil min Mir mit mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul mul mys nan Nat nau nec neo neu nev New NGC no nom non non nor not nuc nuc num nut obj obs obs occ ocu oft ome Oor ope opp opt opt orb ord ori ort osc out ove oxi pai pan par par par par pas pea pen per per per per Per per pha phi pho pho pho phy pio Pla pla pla pla Pla plu Poi pol pol pol poo pos pos pot pra pre pre pre pre pri pri pro pro pro pro pro Pro pro pse pul pur qua qua qua qua que rac rad rad rad rad rad rad ran rar ray rea rea rec rec red red ref ref reg rel rel rel ren res res res res ret rev Ric rig rin roc roo rot rot Rus Sac sal sat sca sca Sch sci Scu sec sec Sed sel Sel sen ser Sex Sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin siz sla Sma sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spi spr squ sta sta sta sta ste ste ste Sto Str str str sub sub suc sun sup sup sup sup sur swa syn syn tab tar tek tem ter tes the the the the Tho thr tid tim Tis Too Tor tra tra Tra tra tra tri tri tru Tul tur two Typ ult un- und uni uni unk upp Urc utt val var vec vel ver vib vio vir vis voi vor wan wat wav wax wea Wei whi Wil win WN9 wor X-r yel you zer zod > >>