An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
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فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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<< < -es -iv -ti 21 a p abe abs abs aca acc acc acr act ada adh Adr aer AGB air Alf Alg all alp alt AM amo ana And ang ani ano Ant Ant apa apo app app Ara Arc ari Arr ash ass ast ast asy atm ato att aut ave axi Bab bal Bal bar bar bea Bek Bes bia Big bin bin bip biv bla bli blu Boh Bol Bos bou bra bri bro buo cal cal can cap car Car cat cat CCD Cen cen CH cha cha che Che chr cir cir cit cla clo clo clu Coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com Com con con con con con con con con con con con con Cop Cor cor cor cos cos cou cou Cow cre cri cro cry cur cya Cyg dan dar dat de- deb dec dec ded def deg del dem den dep des det dev dia dif dif dih dio Dir dis dis dis dis dis dis DO don dou dow dro dur dwa dyn Dys ear ebb ecl edg egg Ein Ela ele ele ele ele ell eme emp enc eng ent epi equ equ equ esc eth Eur Eve exa exc exe exi exp exp ext ext ext fac fal far fed Fer fer fie fin fir fis fla flo flu fol for for fou fra fre Fre fro fut G-t gal gal gam gas Gau Gem gen geo geo geo gia Gli Gol gra gra gra gra gre gri gui H I Hag hal har hat He- hea hel Hel her Hes hie hig his hom hor hot Hub Hug hur hyd hyd hyg hyp ice ide ima Ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf ing inn ins ins int int int int int int int int inv Io ion iro isl iso iso Jac jet jud jur Kel Kep kil Klo Kui Lag lam Lap Lar lat law lea len lep Lib lig lim lin lin Lio lit loc LOF lon Lor low lum lun Lup Lyo mac mag mag mag mag mag mai man Mar mas mas mat Max mea mec Meg Mer Mer met met Met mic Mid Mil min Mir mit mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul mul mys nan Nat nau nec neo neu nev New NGC no nom non non nor not nuc nuc num nut obj obs obs occ ocu oft ome Oor ope opp opt opt orb ord ori ort osc out ove oxi pai pan par par par par pas pea pen per per per per Per per pha phi pho pho pho phy pio Pla pla pla pla Pla plu Poi pol pol pol poo pos pos pot pra pre pre pre pre pri pri pro pro pro pro pro Pro pro pse pul pur qua qua qua qua que rac rad rad rad rad rad rad ran rar ray rea rea rec rec red red ref ref reg rel rel rel ren res res res res ret rev Ric rig rin roc roo rot rot Rus Sac sal sat sca sca Sch sci Scu sec sec Sed sel Sel sen ser Sex Sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin siz sla Sma sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spi spr squ sta sta sta sta ste ste ste Sto Str str str sub sub suc sun sup sup sup sup sur swa syn syn tab tar tek tem ter tes the the the the Tho thr tid tim Tis Too Tor tra tra Tra tra tra tri tri tru Tul tur two Typ ult un- und uni uni unk upp Urc utt val var vec vel ver vib vio vir vis voi vor wan wat wav wax wea Wei whi Wil win WN9 wor X-r yel you zer zod > >>

Number of Results: 13048 Search : far
pair instability
  ناپایداری ِ جفت   
nâpâydâri-ye joft

Fr.: instabilité de paire   

An instability arising from the → pair production inside a → massive star leading to energetic → supernova explosions. The pair instability occurs when, late in the star's life, the core reaches a sufficiently high temperature after → carbon burning, a condition in which the pair production can take place. The pairs of electron and positron annihilate to form a neutrino and an anti-neutrino. Consequently, the pressure drops and the outer layers fall in onto the core. The temperature and pressure increase rapidly and eventually titanic nuclear burning causes an extraordinary explosion with energies higher than 1051 erg. See also → pair-instability supernova and → pulsational pair-instability supernova.

pair; → instability.

pair production
  فر‌آورش ِ جفت   
farâvareš-e joft

Fr.: production de paires   

The creation of an → elementary particle and its → antiparticle from a → boson. For example, the formation of an → electron and a → positron in the interaction of high-energy → gamma ray photons, having at least 1.02 Mev, with an → atomic nucleus (γ → e- + e+). The → rest masses of the electron and positron being 0.51 MeV each, the excess energy will be carried away by these two particles. Pair production is the inverse process to → pair annihilation.

pair; → production

pair-instability
  ناپایداری ِ جفت   
nâpâydâri-ye joft

Fr.: instabilité de paire   

pair instability

pair; → instability.

pair-instability supernova
  اَبَر-نو‌اختر ِ ناپایداری ِ جفت   
abar-now-axtar-e nâpâydâri-ye joft

Fr.: supernova à instabilité de paires   

A special type of → supernova that would result from the → pair instability in → supermassive stars with a mass range between 140 and 260 Msun in a low → metallicity environment. Such objects descended from the → Population III stars in the early history of the Universe. Such supernovae are the most powerful thermonuclear explosions in the Universe. Pair-instability supernovae may have played an important role in the synthesis of → heavy elements. Moreover, the energetic feedback of the processed elements to their surroundings could have affected the structure and evolution of the early Universe (See, e.g., Fryer et al. 2001, ApJ 550, 372; Heger & Woosley 2002, ApJ 567, 532). See also → pulsational pair-instability supernova.

pair; → instability; → supernova.

pairing energy
  کاروژ ِ جفتش   
kâruž-e jofteš

Fr.: énergie de parité   

In nuclear physics, the extra binding energy associated with pairs of nucleons of the same kind. This quantity expresses the fact that nuclei with odd numbers of neutrons and protons have less energy and are less stable than those with even numbers of neutrons and protons.

Pairing, verbal noun of → pair; → energy.

palate
  کام   
kâm (#)

Fr.: palais   

The roof of the → mouth, separating the oral and nasal cavities. → hard palate; → soft palate.

M.E., from O.Fr. palat and directly from L. palatum "roof of the mouth."

Kâm "roof of the mouth," of unknown origin.

pale
  پال   
pâl

Fr.: pâle   

Lacking in color, not bright, weak in color or shade.

M.E., from O.Fr. paile "pale, light-colored," from L. pallidus "pale, pallid, colorless," from pallere "be pale, grow pale."

Pâl, from p(ox) + âl, a combination of (Delijân) pox "pale" + (Kurd) âl "pale."

paleo-
  پارین-، پارینه-، دیرین-، دیرینه-   
pârin- (#), pârine- (#), dirin- (#), dirine- (#)

Fr.: paléo-   

A prefix meaning "old, ancient" especially in reference to former geologic time periods, e.g. → paleoclimatology, → paleolithic, and → paleomagnetism.

From Gk. palaio-, combining form of palaios "old, ancient," from palai "long ago, far back," from PIE root *kwel- "to turn, move about," also "far"

Pârin, pâriné "ancient," also "last year" (contraction of pâr sâl), related to pir "old;" Mid.Pers. pir "old, aged, ancient;" Av. parô (adv.) "before, before (of time), in front (of space);" cf. Skt. puáh, combining form of puras "before (of time and place), in front, in advance."
Dirin, diriné "old, ancient, of times past," from dir "old, antique; a long while" + suffix -in. The first component from Mid.Pers. dêr, variants dagr, drâz "long" (Mod.Pers. derâz "long," variant Laki, Kurdi derež); O.Pers. darga- "long;" Av. darəga-, darəγa- "long," drājištəm "longest;" cf. Skt. dirghá- "long (in space and time);" L. longus "long;" Gk. dolikhos "elongated;" O.H.G., Ger. lang; Goth. laggs "long;" PIE base *dlonghos- "long." The second component -in adj. suffix, from Mid.Pers. -ên (as in âhênên, zarrên), from Av. -aēna- (ayanhaēna- "made of iron," zaranaēna- "golden"); cf. Skt. -ēna-.

paleoclimate
  پارین-کلیما   
pârin-kelimâ

Fr.: paléoclimat   

The climate during a past geologic time or before historical records.

paleo-; → climate.

paleoclimatology
  پارین-کلیما‌شناسی   
pârin-kelimâšenâsi

Fr.: paléoclimatologie   

The study of past → climates throughout → geologic and → historic time (paleoclimates), and the causes of their variations.

paleo-; → climatology.

Paleogene
  پارینزاد   
Pârinzâd

Fr.: Paléogène   

A period of → geologic time lasting about 42 million years, roughly from 65 to 23 million years ago. The Paleogene is most notable as being the time in which mammals evolved from relatively small, simple forms into a large group of diverse animals in the wake of the → Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event that ended the preceding → Cretaceous period. Birds also evolved considerably during this period, changing into roughly modern forms.

Literally "ancient birth," from → paleo- + -gene, → gene.

paleolithic
  پارین‌سنگی   
pârin-sangi (#)

Fr.: paléolithique   

Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the cultures of the Old Stone Age, marked by the earliest known chipped stone tools. The period continued from about 750,000 years ago, until the beginning of the Mesolithic Age, about 15,000 years ago.

paleo-; lithic, from Gk. lithos "stone."

paleomagnetism
  پارین‌مغناتیس   
pârin-meqnâtis

Fr.: paléomagnétisme   

The study of natural remanent magnetization in order to determine the intensity and direction of the Earth's magnetic field in the geologic past.

paleo-; → magnetism.

paleontology
  پارین‌شناسی   
pârin-šenâsi (#)

Fr.: paléontologie   

The study of ancient life through → fossils.

From Fr. paléontologie, from paléo-, → paleo-, + onto-, from Gk. ont- "being," pr.p. of einai "to be," + → -logy.

Pârin-šenâsi, from pârin-, → paleo- + šenâsi, → -logy.

Palermo scale
  مرپل ِ پالرمو   
marpel-e Palermo

Fr.: échelle de Palerme   

A technical scale that categorizes the → impact hazard of a → near-Earth object (NEO). It compares the threat of a given NEO to the so-called background threat of all NEOs of the same size or larger. In this way, the probability of the → impact itself as well as the time until the predicted impact are considered. The scale is → logarithmic and continuous. A Palermo scale of -2 indicates that the predicted event is only 1% as likely as a random background event between now and the time of predicted impact. A value of 0 indicates that the risk is the same as the risk from the background threats. A value of +2 indicates an event that is 100 times more likely than the background hazard. The Palermo scale is defined in the paper "Quantifying the risk posed by potential Earth impacts" by Chesley et al. (2002), Icarus 159n 423. See also → Torino scale.

Named after Palermo, in recognition of the Palermo Observatory, where in 1801 the first and largest asteroid (→ Ceres) was discovered by the Italian astronomer Giuseppe Piazzi (1746-1826); → scale.

palladium
  پالادیوم   
pâlâdiom (#)

Fr.: palladium   

A silvery white metal which belongs to the → platinum group elements, symbol Pd. → Atomic weight 106.4, → atomic number 46, → melting point 1554.9 °C, → boiling point 2963 °C. It is used in alloys and as a catalyst.

Named 1803 by discoverer William Hyde Wollaston (1766-1828), after the asteroid → Pallas, which was discovered at about the same time.

pallasite
  پالاسیت   
pâllâsit

Fr.: pallasite   

A class of → iron meteorite containing → olivine crystals.

Named after the German naturalist Peter Pallas (1741-1811), who first studied such a type of meteorites.

Palomar Observatory
  نپاهشگاه ِ پالومار   
nepâhešgâh-e Palomar

Fr.: Observatoire du Mont Palomar   

An observatory located atop Palomar Mountain about 65 km north-northeast of San Diego, California. It is a center of astronomical research owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Observatory is home to three active research telescopes: the 200-inch (5.1-meter) Hale Telescope, the 48-inch (1.25-meter) Samuel Oschin Telescope, and the 60-inch (1.5-meter) telescope. Research at Palomar Observatory is pursued by a broad community of astronomers from Caltech and other domestic and international partner institutions. The famous Hale Telescope proved instrumental in cosmological research. It was the largest instrument of its kind until 1976.

Palomar, a mountain ridge in the Peninsular Ranges in northern San Diego County whose highest elevation is 1,871 m; → Observatory.

Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS)
  بردید ِ آسمان ِ نپاهشگاه ِ پالومار   
bardid-e âsmân-e nepâhešgâh-e Palomar

Fr.: Palomar Observatory Sky Survey   

A photographic atlas of the northern hemisphere and a portion of the southern hemisphere created at Mount → Palomar Observatory in southern California. The original survey was completed in 1954 using the 48-in Schmidt (Oschin) Telescope. The square photographic plates were 35.5 cm (14-inch) on a side, each encompassing roughly 6 × 6 degrees of the sky. The survey was originally intended to cover the entire sky from +90 degrees declination down to -24 degrees (plate centers) in 879 regions, using both red and blue sensitive emulsions, and including stars to magnitude +22. Ultimately the survey was extended to -30 degrees (both red and blue), an additional 57 regions. Finally, the Whiteoak Southern Extension was added in 1962 (red plates only), with another 100 plates which extended the set down to a declination of -42 degrees plate center.

Palomar Observatory; → sky; → survey.

Pan
  پان   
Pân (#)

Fr.: Pan   

The innermost of Saturn's known satellites, orbiting within the Encke Division in the A Ring at a distance of 133,583 km. Also know as Saturn XVIII. It orbits Saturn every 0.575 days and its diameter is about 20 km. Pan was discovered in 1990 from Voyager photos taken in 1981.

In Gk. mythology, Pan was the god of woods, fields, and flocks, having a human torso and head with a goat's legs, horns, and ears.

<< < -es -iv -ti 21 a p abe abs abs aca acc acc acr act ada adh Adr aer AGB air Alf Alg all alp alt AM amo ana And ang ani ano Ant Ant apa apo app app Ara Arc ari Arr ash ass ast ast asy atm ato att aut ave axi Bab bal Bal bar bar bea Bek Bes bia Big bin bin bip biv bla bli blu Boh Bol Bos bou bra bri bro buo cal cal can cap car Car cat cat CCD Cen cen CH cha cha che Che chr cir cir cit cla clo clo clu Coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com Com con con con con con con con con con con con con Cop Cor cor cor cos cos cou cou Cow cre cri cro cry cur cya Cyg dan dar dat de- deb dec dec ded def deg del dem den dep des det dev dia dif dif dih dio Dir dis dis dis dis dis dis DO don dou dow dro dur dwa dyn Dys ear ebb ecl edg egg Ein Ela ele ele ele ele ell eme emp enc eng ent epi equ equ equ esc eth Eur Eve exa exc exe exi exp exp ext ext ext fac fal far fed Fer fer fie fin fir fis fla flo flu fol for for fou fra fre Fre fro fut G-t gal gal gam gas Gau Gem gen geo geo geo gia Gli Gol gra gra gra gra gre gri gui H I Hag hal har hat He- hea hel Hel her Hes hie hig his hom hor hot Hub Hug hur hyd hyd hyg hyp ice ide ima Ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf ing inn ins ins int int int int int int int int inv Io ion iro isl iso iso Jac jet jud jur Kel Kep kil Klo Kui Lag lam Lap Lar lat law lea len lep Lib lig lim lin lin Lio lit loc LOF lon Lor low lum lun Lup Lyo mac mag mag mag mag mag mai man Mar mas mas mat Max mea mec Meg Mer Mer met met Met mic Mid Mil min Mir mit mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul mul mys nan Nat nau nec neo neu nev New NGC no nom non non nor not nuc nuc num nut obj obs obs occ ocu oft ome Oor ope opp opt opt orb ord ori ort osc out ove oxi pai pan par par par par pas pea pen per per per per Per per pha phi pho pho pho phy pio Pla pla pla pla Pla plu Poi pol pol pol poo pos pos pot pra pre pre pre pre pri pri pro pro pro pro pro Pro pro pse pul pur qua qua qua qua que rac rad rad rad rad rad rad ran rar ray rea rea rec rec red red ref ref reg rel rel rel ren res res res res ret rev Ric rig rin roc roo rot rot Rus Sac sal sat sca sca Sch sci Scu sec sec Sed sel Sel sen ser Sex Sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin siz sla Sma sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spi spr squ sta sta sta sta ste ste ste Sto Str str str sub sub suc sun sup sup sup sup sur swa syn syn tab tar tek tem ter tes the the the the Tho thr tid tim Tis Too Tor tra tra Tra tra tra tri tri tru Tul tur two Typ ult un- und uni uni unk upp Urc utt val var vec vel ver vib vio vir vis voi vor wan wat wav wax wea Wei whi Wil win WN9 wor X-r yel you zer zod > >>