An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
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فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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<< < -es -iv -ti 21 a p abe abs abs aca acc acc acr act ada adh Adr aer AGB air Alf Alg all alp alt AM amo ana And ang ani ano Ant Ant apa apo app app Ara Arc ari Arr ash ass ast ast asy atm ato att aut ave axi Bab bal Bal bar bar bea Bek Bes bia Big bin bin bip biv bla bli blu Boh Bol Bos bou bra bri bro buo cal cal can cap car Car cat cat CCD Cen cen CH cha cha che Che chr cir cir cit cla clo clo clu Coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com Com con con con con con con con con con con con con Cop Cor cor cor cos cos cou cou Cow cre cri cro cry cur cya Cyg dan dar dat de- deb dec dec ded def deg del dem den dep des det dev dia dif dif dih dio Dir dis dis dis dis dis dis DO don dou dow dro dur dwa dyn Dys ear ebb ecl edg egg Ein Ela ele ele ele ele ell eme emp enc eng ent epi equ equ equ esc eth Eur Eve exa exc exe exi exp exp ext ext ext fac fal far fed Fer fer fie fin fir fis fla flo flu fol for for fou fra fre Fre fro fut G-t gal gal gam gas Gau Gem gen geo geo geo gia Gli Gol gra gra gra gra gre gri gui H I Hag hal har hat He- hea hel Hel her Hes hie hig his hom hor hot Hub Hug hur hyd hyd hyg hyp ice ide ima Ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf ing inn ins ins int int int int int int int int inv Io ion iro isl iso iso Jac jet jud jur Kel Kep kil Klo Kui Lag lam Lap Lar lat law lea len lep Lib lig lim lin lin Lio lit loc LOF lon Lor low lum lun Lup Lyo mac mag mag mag mag mag mai man Mar mas mas mat Max mea mec Meg Mer Mer met met Met mic Mid Mil min Mir mit mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul mul mys nan Nat nau nec neo neu nev New NGC no nom non non nor not nuc nuc num nut obj obs obs occ ocu oft ome Oor ope opp opt opt orb ord ori ort osc out ove oxi pai pan par par par par pas pea pen per per per per Per per pha phi pho pho pho phy pio Pla pla pla pla Pla plu Poi pol pol pol poo pos pos pot pra pre pre pre pre pri pri pro pro pro pro pro Pro pro pse pul pur qua qua qua qua que rac rad rad rad rad rad rad ran rar ray rea rea rec rec red red ref ref reg rel rel rel ren res res res res ret rev Ric rig rin roc roo rot rot Rus Sac sal sat sca sca Sch sci Scu sec sec Sed sel Sel sen ser Sex Sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin siz sla Sma sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spi spr squ sta sta sta sta ste ste ste Sto Str str str sub sub suc sun sup sup sup sup sur swa syn syn tab tar tek tem ter tes the the the the Tho thr tid tim Tis Too Tor tra tra Tra tra tra tri tri tru Tul tur two Typ ult un- und uni uni unk upp Urc utt val var vec vel ver vib vio vir vis voi vor wan wat wav wax wea Wei whi Wil win WN9 wor X-r yel you zer zod > >>

Number of Results: 13048 Search : far
bronze
  برنز، مفرغ   
boronz (#), mefraq (#)

Fr.: bronze   

A class of → alloys in which → copper and → tin are the dominant elements. The name is extended by usage to include many other copper-rich alloys containing → phosphorus, → manganese, → aluminium, or → silicon.

From Fr. bronze, from It. bronzo, from M.L. bronzium, of unknown origin, maybe from Iranian, cf. Mid.Pers. brinj "bronze, brass;" Mod.Pers. berenj "brass."

Boronz, loan from Fr., as above. Mefraq, from Ar.

Bronze Age
  عصر ِ برنز   
asr-e boronz (#)

Fr.: âge du fer   

A period of time between the → Stone Age and the → Iron Age when bronze was used widely to make tools, weapons, and other implements. The Bronze Age starts at different areas of the world at different times. The earliest use of bronze for making farm tools and weapons are found in Near and Middle East and date back to about 3700 BC. The Bronze Age starts about 2300 BC in Europe.

bronze; → age.

brother
  برادر   
barâdar (#)

Fr.: frère   

Son of the same parents as another person.

M.E.; O.E. brothor; cognate with Du. broeder, Ger. Bruder, Goth. brothar, Skt. bhrātr, Gk. phrater, L. frater, Pers. barâdar, as below, Rus. brat; PIE *bhrater.

Barâdar, from Mid.Pers. brât(ar) "brother;" O.Pers. brata-; Av. brātar- "brother;" cognate with E. brother, as above.

brown
  قهوه‌ای   
qahve-yi (#)

Fr.: brun   

A dusky color between red and black.

M.E. broun, from O.E. brun "dark," cf. Du. bruin, Ger. braun; PIE base *bher- "shining, brown," related to *bheros "dark animal" (cf. beaver, bear).

Qahvei-yi, color of qahvé "coffee."

brown dwarf
  کوتوله‌ی ِ قهوه‌ای   
kutule-ye qahvei

Fr.: naine brune   

A star-like object whose mass is too small to sustain → hydrogen fusion in its interior and become a star. Brown dwarfs are → substellar objects and occupy an intermediate regime between those of stars and giant planets. With a mass less than 0.08 times that of the Sun (about 80 → Jupiter masses), nuclear reactions in the core of brown dwarfs are limited to the transformation of → deuterium into 3He. The reason is that the cores of these objects are supported against → gravitational collapse by electron → degeneracy pressure (at early spectral types) and → Coulomb pressure (at later spectral types). Brown dwarfs, as ever cooling objects, will have late M dwarf spectral types within a few Myrs of their formation and gradually evolve as L, T and Y dwarfs → brown dwarf cooling. As late-M and early-L dwarfs, they overlap in temperature with the cool end of the stellar → main sequence (→ M dwarf, → L dwarf, → T dwarf, → Y dwarf). In contrast to the OBAFGKM sequence, the M-L-T-Y sequence is an evolutionary one. These objects were first postulated by Kumar (1963, ApJ 137, 1121 & 1126) and Hayashi & Nakano (1963, Prog. Theor.Phys. 30, 460).

The term brown dwarf was first used by Jill Tarter in her 1975 PhD thesis; → brown; → dwarf.

brown dwarf cooling
  سردش ِ کوتوله‌ی ِ قهوه‌ای   
sardeš-e kutule-ye qahve-yi

Fr.: refroidissement de naine brune   

The process whereby a → brown dwarf cools over time after the → deuterium burning phase, which lasts a few 107 years. The → effective temperature and luminosity decrease depending on the mass, age, and → metallicity. Even though massive brown dwarfs may start out with star-like luminosity (≥ 10-3solar luminosities), they progressively fade with age to the point where, after 0.5 Gyr all → substellar objects are less luminous than the dimmest, lowest mass stars. More explicitly, brown dwarfs may start as star-like objects hotter than 2200 K, with → M dwarf spectral types, and, as they get older, pass through the later and cooler L, T, and Y spectral types (→ L dwarf, → T dwarf, → Y dwarf).

brown; → dwarf; → cooling.

brown dwarf desert
  کویر ِ کوتوله‌های ِ قهوه‌ای   
kavir-e kutulehâ-ye qahvei

Fr.: désert des naines brunes   

The observational result indicating a deficit in the frequency of → brown dwarf companions to Sun-like stars, either relative to the frequency of less massive planetary companions or relative to the frequency of more massive stellar companions. However, this desert exists mainly for low-separation brown dwarfs detected using orbital velocity surveys. No brown dwarf desert is noticed at wide separations (J. E. Gizis et al. 2001, ApJ 551, L163).

brown; → dwarf; → desert.

Brownian motion
  جنبش ِ براؤنی   
jonbeš-e Brawni

Fr.: mouvement brownien   

The continuous random motion of solid microscopic particles immersed in a fluid, which is due to bombardment by the atoms and molecules of the medium. It is named after the botanist Robert Brown, who in 1827 first noticed that pollen seeds suspended in water moved in an irregular motion. While there were suspicions that the motion was caused by the collision of atoms against the particles, the first quantitative explanation of the phenomenon, based on the kinetic theory of gases, was forwarded by A. Einstein in 1905. When Einstein's paper appeared, the notion of atoms and molecules was still a subject of heated scientific debate. Ernst Mach and the physical chemist Wilhelm Ostwald were among those who chose to deny their existence.

Named after Robert Brown (1773-1858), a Scottish botanist, who first in 1827 noticed the erratic motion of pollen grains suspended in water. → motion.

Brunt-Vaisala frequency
  بسامد ِ برانت-وایسالا   
basâmad-e Brunt-Väisälä

Fr.: fréquence de Brunt-Väisälä   

The frequency at which an air parcel will oscillate when subjected to an infinitesimal perturbation in a stably stratified atmosphere. For a medium with a continuous density gradient, it is expressed by the formula: N2 = -(g/ρ)∂ρ/∂z , where g is the → gravitational acceleration, ρ is density, and z geometric height. The stability condition is N > 0. It is also sometimes referred to as the buoyancy frequency. The higher the value of N the more stable the flow.

Named aster David Brunt (1886-1965), British meteorologist (1927, Q.J.R.Met.Soc. 53, 30) and Vilho Väisälä (1889-1969), Finnish meteorologist (1925, Soc. Sci. Fenn. Commental. Phys. Math. 2 (19), 19); → frequency.

bubble
  تنگل، حباب   
tangol, hobâb

Fr.: bulle   

General:A small body of gas within a liquid; a thin film of liquid inflated with air or gas.
Astro.: 1) Bubble-like structures of hot ionized gas created in the interstellar medium by the action of the powerful winds of massive stars.
2) A giant bubble-like component appearing during the growth of large-scale structures in the early Universe.

Bubble, from M.E. bobel, perhaps from M.Du. bobbel.

Tangol "bubble," from štiyâni dialect, maybe from tan "body" + gol "flower," literally "that which has a delicate body (like a flower)." This etymology is derived from the observation that in Pers. bubble is often likened to a flower: qonce-ye âb, kupale-ye âb, quze-ye âb [Dehxodâ] "water blossom, water flower, water bud."
Hobâb, from Ar. habâb.

bubble chamber
  اتاقک ِ تنگل، ~ حباب   
otâqak-e tangol, ~ hobâb

Fr.: chambre à bulles   

A tank filled with a transparent liquid that is on the brink of boiling. When a charged particle passes through the liquid, the energy deposited initiates boiling along the path, leaving a trail of tiny bubbles. The bubble chamber is no longer in wide use for particle experiments.

bubble; → chamber.

Bubble Nebula
  میغ ِ تنگل، ~ حباب   
miq-e tangol, ~ hobâb

Fr.: Nébuleuse bulle   

The → diffuse nebula NGC 7635 in the constellation → Cassiopeia lying at a distance of about 11,000 light-years. About 10 light-years across, it is visible with a small telescope.

bubble; → nebula.

bug
  بوگ   
bug

Fr.: bug, bogue   

A defect or imperfection, as in a mechanical device, computer program, or plan (Dictionary.com).

From bugge "beetle," apparently alteration of M.E. budde, O.E. -budda "beetle."

Bug, from Kurd. Kurmanji bihuk "bug, insect."

Bug Nebula
  میغ ِ شاپرک   
miq-e Šâparak

Fr.: nébuleuse de l'insecte   

The double-lobed → planetary nebula NGC 6302, which lies in → Scorpius at a distance of about 4000 → light-years. The central very hot star seems to have violently ejected material in two distinct directions.

bug; → nebula.

Šâparak "night butterfly, bat," from šab "night" + parak "flying," from paridan "to fly."

bulge
  کوژی، بر‌آمدگی   
kuži, barâmadegi

Fr.: bulbe, bourrelet   

1) A rounded projection, bend, or protruding part; protuberance; hump (Dictionary.com).
2) → galaxy bulge.

Bulge, from O.Fr. bouge "leather bag," from L. bulga "leather bag," of Gaulish origin.

Kuži "convexity," from kuž, → convex.
Barâmadegi, from barâmadan "to grow out; to emerge," from bar- "on, upon, up" (Mid.Pers. abar, O.Pers. upariy "above; over, upon, according to," Av. upairi "above, over," upairi.zəma- "located above the earth;" cf. Gk. hyper- "over, above;" L. super-; O.H.G. ubir "over;" PIE base *uper "over") + âmadan "to come" (Mid.Pers. âmadan; O.Pers. gam- "to come; to go;" Av. gam- "to come; to go," jamaiti "goes;" cf. Skt. gamati "goes;" Gk. bainein "to go, walk, step;" L. venire "to come;" Tocharian A käm- "to come;" O.H.G. queman "to come;" E. come; PIE root *gwem- "to go, come").

bullet
  گلوله   
golulé (#)

Fr.: balle   

1) A small, metal object that is fired from a gun.
2) Something resembling a bullet, in shape or effect. → Bullet cluster.

From M.Fr. boulette "cannonball, small ball," diminutive of boule "a ball," from L. bulla "round thing, bubble, knob," cognate with bowl and boil.

Golulé "bullet," variants gullé, goruk, gulu, gudé, guy "ball, sphere;" cf. Skt. guda- "ball, mouthful, lump, tumour;" Pali gula- "ball;" Gk. gloutos "rump;" L. glomus "ball," globus "globe;" Ger. Kugel, E. clot; PIE *gel- "to make into a ball."

Bullet cluster
  خوشه‌ی ِ گلوله   
xuše-ye golulé

Fr.: amas de la Balle, ~ du Boulet   

A → cluster of galaxies at a → redshift of z = 0.296 undergoing a violent → merger process nearly in the → plane of the sky. Also known as 1E 0657-558. The head-on collision between the main cluster and a subcluster ramming with an apparent speed of about 4700 km s-1 occurred about 150 x 106 years ago. The two clusters are currently moving away from each other while the space between them is filled with a very hot gas (first observed in X-rays by → Chandra) resulting from the overheating due to the collision. The Bullet cluster has the highest X-ray luminosity and temperature of all known clusters. The X-ray gas of the bullet (amounting to 2 x 1013 solar masses) collides with the X-ray gas of the main cluster (1014 solar masses) and forms a well defined → supersonic (Mach 3) → bow shock. A significant offset between the distribution of X-ray emission and the mass distribution has been observed, and diversely interpreted.

The name Bullet refers to the smaller subcluster, that has created the bow shock; → cluster.

bump Cepheid
  کِفِیءوسی ِ قوزدار، ~ زوکدار   
Kefeusi-ye quzâr, ~ zokdâr

Fr.: céphéide à bosse   

A subtype of classical → Cepheid variable stars that show a bump on the descending branch of their → light curve.

Bump "a relatively abrupt convexity or bulge on a surface," probably imitative of the sound of a blow; → Cepheid.

Quzdâr, from quz "hump," variant of kuž, → convex, + -dâr "possessing," from dâštan "to have, possess." Zokdâr, from Lori zok "a raised spot, a bulge," cf. Northern Fârs Âbâdé dialect lok " swellimg, knob;" Kefeusi, → Cepheid.

buoyancy
  بالارانی   
bâlârâni

Fr.: flottabilité   

The upward force that a → fluid exerts on an immersed body which is less dense than the fluid. It is equal to the → weight of the fluid displaced. Thus a body weighs less when weighed in water, the apparent loss in weight being equal to the weight of the water displaced. Buoyancy allows a boat to float on water and provides lift for balloons. See also → buoyant force; → Archimedes' principle.

From buoy, → buoyant + -ancy a suffix used to form nouns denoting state or quality, from L. -antia, from -ant + -ia.

Bâlârâni literally "pushing up," from bâlâ "up, above, high, elevated, height" (variants boland "high, tall, elevated, sublime," borz "height, magnitude" (it occurs also in the name of the mountain chain Alborz), Laki dialect berg "hill, mountain;" Mid.Pers. buland "high;" O.Pers. baršan- "height;" Av. barəz- "high, mount," barezan- "height;" cf. Skt. bhrant- "high;" L. fortis "strong" (Fr. and E. force); O.E. burg, burh "castle, fortified place," from P.Gmc. *burgs "fortress;" Ger. Burg "castle," Goth. baurgs "city," E. burg, borough, Fr. bourgeois, bourgeoisie, faubourg; PIE base *bhergh- "high") + râni verbal noun of rândan "to push, drive, cause to go," causative of raftan "to go, walk, proceed" (present tense stem row-, Mid.Pers. raftan, raw-, Proto-Iranian *rab/f- "to go; to attack").

buoyancy frequency
  بسامد ِ بالارانی   
basâmad-e bâlârâni

Fr.: fréquence de flottabilité   

Same as the → Brunt-Vaisala frequency.

buoyancy; → frequency.

<< < -es -iv -ti 21 a p abe abs abs aca acc acc acr act ada adh Adr aer AGB air Alf Alg all alp alt AM amo ana And ang ani ano Ant Ant apa apo app app Ara Arc ari Arr ash ass ast ast asy atm ato att aut ave axi Bab bal Bal bar bar bea Bek Bes bia Big bin bin bip biv bla bli blu Boh Bol Bos bou bra bri bro buo cal cal can cap car Car cat cat CCD Cen cen CH cha cha che Che chr cir cir cit cla clo clo clu Coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com Com con con con con con con con con con con con con Cop Cor cor cor cos cos cou cou Cow cre cri cro cry cur cya Cyg dan dar dat de- deb dec dec ded def deg del dem den dep des det dev dia dif dif dih dio Dir dis dis dis dis dis dis DO don dou dow dro dur dwa dyn Dys ear ebb ecl edg egg Ein Ela ele ele ele ele ell eme emp enc eng ent epi equ equ equ esc eth Eur Eve exa exc exe exi exp exp ext ext ext fac fal far fed Fer fer fie fin fir fis fla flo flu fol for for fou fra fre Fre fro fut G-t gal gal gam gas Gau Gem gen geo geo geo gia Gli Gol gra gra gra gra gre gri gui H I Hag hal har hat He- hea hel Hel her Hes hie hig his hom hor hot Hub Hug hur hyd hyd hyg hyp ice ide ima Ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf ing inn ins ins int int int int int int int int inv Io ion iro isl iso iso Jac jet jud jur Kel Kep kil Klo Kui Lag lam Lap Lar lat law lea len lep Lib lig lim lin lin Lio lit loc LOF lon Lor low lum lun Lup Lyo mac mag mag mag mag mag mai man Mar mas mas mat Max mea mec Meg Mer Mer met met Met mic Mid Mil min Mir mit mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul mul mys nan Nat nau nec neo neu nev New NGC no nom non non nor not nuc nuc num nut obj obs obs occ ocu oft ome Oor ope opp opt opt orb ord ori ort osc out ove oxi pai pan par par par par pas pea pen per per per per Per per pha phi pho pho pho phy pio Pla pla pla pla Pla plu Poi pol pol pol poo pos pos pot pra pre pre pre pre pri pri pro pro pro pro pro Pro pro pse pul pur qua qua qua qua que rac rad rad rad rad rad rad ran rar ray rea rea rec rec red red ref ref reg rel rel rel ren res res res res ret rev Ric rig rin roc roo rot rot Rus Sac sal sat sca sca Sch sci Scu sec sec Sed sel Sel sen ser Sex Sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin siz sla Sma sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spi spr squ sta sta sta sta ste ste ste Sto Str str str sub sub suc sun sup sup sup sup sur swa syn syn tab tar tek tem ter tes the the the the Tho thr tid tim Tis Too Tor tra tra Tra tra tra tri tri tru Tul tur two Typ ult un- und uni uni unk upp Urc utt val var vec vel ver vib vio vir vis voi vor wan wat wav wax wea Wei whi Wil win WN9 wor X-r yel you zer zod > >>