An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
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فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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<< < -es -iv -ti 21 a p abe abs abs aca acc acc acr act ada adh Adr aer AGB air Alf Alg all alp alt AM amo ana And ang ani ano Ant Ant apa apo app app Ara Arc ari Arr ash ass ast ast asy atm ato att aut ave axi Bab bal Bal bar bar bea Bek Bes bia Big bin bin bip biv bla bli blu Boh Bol Bos bou bra bri bro buo cal cal can cap car Car cat cat CCD Cen cen CH cha cha che Che chr cir cir cit cla clo clo clu Coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com Com con con con con con con con con con con con con Cop Cor cor cor cos cos cou cou Cow cre cri cro cry cur cya Cyg dan dar dat de- deb dec dec ded def deg del dem den dep des det dev dia dif dif dih dio Dir dis dis dis dis dis dis DO don dou dow dro dur dwa dyn Dys ear ebb ecl edg egg Ein Ela ele ele ele ele ell eme emp enc eng ent epi equ equ equ esc eth Eur Eve exa exc exe exi exp exp ext ext ext fac fal far fed Fer fer fie fin fir fis fla flo flu fol for for fou fra fre Fre fro fut G-t gal gal gam gas Gau Gem gen geo geo geo gia Gli Gol gra gra gra gra gre gri gui H I Hag hal har hat He- hea hel Hel her Hes hie hig his hom hor hot Hub Hug hur hyd hyd hyg hyp ice ide ima Ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf ing inn ins ins int int int int int int int int inv Io ion iro isl iso iso Jac jet jud jur Kel Kep kil Klo Kui Lag lam Lap Lar lat law lea len lep Lib lig lim lin lin Lio lit loc LOF lon Lor low lum lun Lup Lyo mac mag mag mag mag mag mai man Mar mas mas mat Max mea mec Meg Mer Mer met met Met mic Mid Mil min Mir mit mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul mul mys nan Nat nau nec neo neu nev New NGC no nom non non nor not nuc nuc num nut obj obs obs occ ocu oft ome Oor ope opp opt opt orb ord ori ort osc out ove oxi pai pan par par par par pas pea pen per per per per Per per pha phi pho pho pho phy pio Pla pla pla pla Pla plu Poi pol pol pol poo pos pos pot pra pre pre pre pre pri pri pro pro pro pro pro Pro pro pse pul pur qua qua qua qua que rac rad rad rad rad rad rad ran rar ray rea rea rec rec red red ref ref reg rel rel rel ren res res res res ret rev Ric rig rin roc roo rot rot Rus Sac sal sat sca sca Sch sci Scu sec sec Sed sel Sel sen ser Sex Sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin siz sla Sma sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spi spr squ sta sta sta sta ste ste ste Sto Str str str sub sub suc sun sup sup sup sup sur swa syn syn tab tar tek tem ter tes the the the the Tho thr tid tim Tis Too Tor tra tra Tra tra tra tri tri tru Tul tur two Typ ult un- und uni uni unk upp Urc utt val var vec vel ver vib vio vir vis voi vor wan wat wav wax wea Wei whi Wil win WN9 wor X-r yel you zer zod > >>

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Mercator telescope
  تلسکوپ ِ مرکاتور   
teleskop-e Mercator

Fr.: télescope de Mercator   

A 1.2 m semi-robotic telescope located at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on La Palma Island (Canary Islands, Spain). It is operated by the staff of the Institute of Astronomy, University of Leuven (Belgium). The telescope uses two modern instruments HERMES: a → high-resolution optical → spectrograph, and MAIA, a three-armed camera equipped with large → charge-coupled device (CCD)s and optimized for more specific rapid variability studies. The main science drivers of the research performed on the basis of Mercator data are related to a wide range of variable phenomena with a clear focus on stellar astrophysics, in particular the stellar internal structure by means of → asteroseismology.

Named after the Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator (1512-1594), who studied and taught at the University of Leuven before moving to Duisburg (Germany)

Mercury
  ۱) تیر؛ ۲) جیوه، سیماب   
1) Tir; 2) jivé, simâb

Fr.: Mercure   

1) The closest → planet to the → Sun and one of five planets visible with the naked eye. The → greatest elongation of Mercury is about 28°, making it visible at most about 112 minutes after sunset or before sunrise. It lies at a mean distance of about 0.39 → astronomical units from the Sun. Mercury is just 4,879 km in diameter, about 2.6 times smaller than the Earth. Its → orbital period is 87.97 Earth days. Mercury has a high → density, 5.4 g cm-3, with only the Earth having a higher density among the planets. This is largely due to Mercury being composed mainly of heavy metals and rock. One → solar day on Mercury lasts the equivalent of 176 Earth days while the sidereal day (the time for 1 rotation in relation to a fixed point) lasts 59 Earth days. Mercury is nearly → tidally locked to the Sun and over time this has slowed the rotation of the planet to almost match its orbit around the Sun. Mercury also has the highest orbital → eccentricity of all the planets with its distance from the Sun ranging from 46 to 70 million km. Mercury has just 38% the → gravity of Earth, this is too little to maintain an atmosphere against → solar winds, which blow it away. The surface of Mercury which faces the Sun has temperatures of up to 427°C, whilst on the alternate side this can be as low as -173°C. Mercury's core has more iron than any other planet in the → solar system. This has to do with its formation and early life. If the planet formed quickly, increasing temperatures of the evolving Sun could have vaporized much of the existing surface, leaving only a thin shell.
2) (lower case): Metallic chemical element, also called quicksilver; symbol Hg (from L. hydrargyrum "liquid silver"). → Atomic number 80; → atomic weight 200.59; → melting point -38.842°C; → boiling point 356.58°C. Mercury was first recognized as a chemical element (in the modern sense) by the French chemist Antoine L. Lavoisier (1743-1794).

From L. Mercurius "Mercury," the Roman god, originally a god of tradesmen and thieves, from merx "merchandise."

1) Mid.Pers. Tîr the name of the planet Mercury, O.Pers. proper noun *Tira-dāta- "given by Tir" (Hellenized Tiridates), Mid.Pers. Tîr.dât the name of three Parthian Kings; Av. Tīro.nakaθwa-.
2) Jivé, variant živé, from Mid.Pers. zivik, zivandag "alive, living," from zivastan "to live," zivižn "life;" O.Pers./Av. gay- "to live," Av. gaya- "life," gaeθâ- "being, world, mankind," jivya-, jva- "aliving, alive;" cf. Skt. jiva- "alive, living;" Gk. bios "life;" L. vivus "living, alive," vita "life;" O.E. cwic "alive;" E. quick; Lith. gyvas "living, alive;" PIE base *gweie- "to live."
Simâb "liquid silver," from sim "silver" (Mid.Pers. âsīm) + âb, → water.

Mercury's tail
  دم ِ تیر   
dom-e Tir

Fr.: queue de Mercure   

A narrow and elongated structure of glowing → sodium gas associated with Mercury. Mercury's thin atmosphere contains small amounts of sodium that glow when excited by radiation from the Sun. Solar photons also liberate these molecules from Mercury's surface and pushes them away. Because Mercury's gravity is too weak to hold a permanent atmosphere, when atoms are evaporated from the planet's surface, some of the atoms form a tail that points away from the Sun. In particular, the yellow glow from sodium → D line is relatively bright. First predicted in the 1980s, the tail was first discovered in 2001 (A.E. Potter et al., 2001). Many tail details were revealed in multiple observations by NASA's robotic → MESSENGER spacecraft that orbited Mercury between 2011 and 2015.

Mercury; → tail.

merge
  ۱) تشکیدن؛ ۲) تشکاندن   
1) taškidan; 2) taškândan

Fr.: fusionner   

1) (v.intr.) To become combined, united, swallowed up, or absorbed; lose identity by uniting or blending.
2) (v.tr.) To cause to combine or coalesce. To combine, blend, or unite gradually so as to blur the individuality or individual identity of.
Related terms: → fuse, → coalesce. See also → merger, → mergeburst, → merger process, → merger tree, → merging, → merging galaxy, → minor merger, → mixed merger, → wet merger.

From L. mergere "to dip, immerse," probably rhotacized from *mezgo, and cognate with Skt. majj- "to dive, to sink," majjati "dives under;" Lith. mazgoju "to wash."

Taškidan, taškândan, from Gilaki tašk "tie, knot;" Tabari tešk "knot" + -idan infinitive suffix.

mergeburst
  تشک-بلک   
tašk-belk

Fr.:   

A hypothetical → transient event undergone by a → star due to its violent → merging with another star in a → close binary star. The release of → orbital energy causes the → envelope of the star to heat up and → inflate, causing the star to brighten considerably. Mergebursts are predicted to rival or exceed the brightest classical → novae in luminosity, but to be much cooler and redder than classical novae, and to become slowly hotter and bluer as they age.

merge; → burst.

merger
  ۱) تشکه؛ ۲) تشک   
1) tašké; 2) tašk

Fr.: fusion, coalescence   

1) Any combination of two or more bodies into a single body. In particular, the formation of a galaxy from the collision of two or more separate galaxies.
2) An act or instance of merging.

From → merge + -er (as in waiver).

Tašké; tašk, nouns from taškidan, → merge.

merger process
  فراروند ِ تشک   
farâravand-e tašk

Fr.: processus de fusion   

The process of collision between galaxies which leads to a single galaxy.

merger; → process.

merger tree
  درخت ِ تشک   
deraxt-e tašk

Fr.: arbre de coalescence   

A method used in → numerical simulations for studying the growth and development of galaxies and → dark matter halos. Within the currently accepted ΛCDM cosmology, dark matter halos merge from small → clumps to ever larger structures. This merging history can be traced in simulations and stored in the form of merger trees. Merger trees are necessary because a galaxy may have more than one → progenitor at an early time.

merger; → tree.

merging
  تشک   
tašk

Fr.: 1) fusion   

1) (n.) The act of joining together as one, such as galaxy → merger.
2) (adj.) That merges.

Noun from → merge.

merging galaxies
  کهکشان‌های ِ تشکنده   
kahkešânhâ-ye taškandé

Fr.: galaxies en coalescence   

Two or more galaxies that collide and merge into one galaxy.

merging; → galaxy.

meridian
  نیمروزان   
nimruzân (#)

Fr.: méridien   

1) Geography: An imaginary line on the Earth's surface joining the north and south poles at right angles to the equator. See also → local meridian, → prime meridian.
2) Astron.: An imaginary great circle on the → celestial sphere that passes through its poles and the observer's → zenith.

M.E., from O.Fr. meridien, from L. meridianus "of noon, southern," from meridies "noon, south," from meridie "at noon," altered by dissimilation from *medi die, locative of medius "mid-" + dies "day."

Nimruzân, coined by Pers. astronomer (A.D. 973-1048) in his at-Tafhim, from nim "mid-, half" (Mid.Pers. nêm, nêmag "half;" Av. naēma- "half;" cf. Skt. néma- "half") + ruz, → day, + -ân suffix denoting time and place.

meridian angle
  زاویه‌ی ِ نیمروزان   
zâviye-ye nimruzân

Fr.: angle horaire   

Same as hour angle.

meridian; → angle.

meridian circle
  پرهون ِ نیمروزانی   
parhun-e nimruzâni

Fr.: circle méridien   

A telescope with a graduated vertical scale, used to measure the declinations of heavenly bodies and sometimes to determine the time of meridian transits.

meridian; → circle.

meridian instrument
  سازال ِ نیمروزانی   
sâzâl-e nimruzâni

Fr.: instrument méridien   

An instrument designed to observe objects when they cross the meridian.

meridian; → observation.

meridian observation
  نپاهش ِ نیمروزانی   
nepâheš-e nimruzâni

Fr.: observation au méridien   

The observation of a star when it crosses an observer's meridian.

meridian; → observation.

meridian passage
  گذر ِ نیمروزانی   
gozar-e nimruzâni

Fr.: passage au méridien   

The moment when a celestial object crosses an observer's meridian. Same as meridian transit.

meridian; → passage.

meridional
  نیمروزانی   
nimruzâni

Fr.: méridien   

Of, pertaining to, or resembling a meridian.

meridian + → -al.

From nimruzân, → meridian, + -i adj. suffix.

meridional circulation
  پرهونش ِ نیمروزانی   
parhuneš-e nimruzâni

Fr.: circulation méridien   

The mass motion of material within a → rotating star generated by the star's departure from spherical symmetry. For a rotating star in which → centrifugal forces are not negligible, → radiative equilibrium and → hydrostatic equilibrium cannot be satisfied. In this condition energy transfer is accomplished by means of the physical motion of material. According to → von Zeipel theorem, the heating on an → equipotential surface is generally higher in the polar direction than in the equatorial direction, which drives a large scale circulation current rising at the pole and descending at the equator. As a consequence, → mixing of material takes place in the stellar interior; see also → Eddington-Sweet time scale. The meridional circulation plays an important role in the evolution of → massive stars. The circulation current was first suggested by Arthur S. Eddington in 1926 (The Internal Constitution of the Stars, Dover Pub. Inc., New York) and subsequently quantified by P. A. Sweet (1950, MNRAS 110, 548).

meridional; → circulation.

meridional flow
  تچان ِ نیمروزانی   
tacân-e nimruzâni

Fr.: courant méridien   

Meteo.: A flow between the poles, or between the equator and the poles. A positive value indicates flow away from the equator; a negative value, flow toward the equator.

meridional; → flow.

meridional magnetic field
  میدان ِ مغناتیسی ِ نیمروزانی   
meydân-e meqnâtisi-ye nimruzâni

Fr.: champ magnétiquue méridien   

In the → solar dynamo model, a magnetic field that points from the north to south or south to north.

meridional; → magnetic; → field.

<< < -es -iv -ti 21 a p abe abs abs aca acc acc acr act ada adh Adr aer AGB air Alf Alg all alp alt AM amo ana And ang ani ano Ant Ant apa apo app app Ara Arc ari Arr ash ass ast ast asy atm ato att aut ave axi Bab bal Bal bar bar bea Bek Bes bia Big bin bin bip biv bla bli blu Boh Bol Bos bou bra bri bro buo cal cal can cap car Car cat cat CCD Cen cen CH cha cha che Che chr cir cir cit cla clo clo clu Coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com Com con con con con con con con con con con con con Cop Cor cor cor cos cos cou cou Cow cre cri cro cry cur cya Cyg dan dar dat de- deb dec dec ded def deg del dem den dep des det dev dia dif dif dih dio Dir dis dis dis dis dis dis DO don dou dow dro dur dwa dyn Dys ear ebb ecl edg egg Ein Ela ele ele ele ele ell eme emp enc eng ent epi equ equ equ esc eth Eur Eve exa exc exe exi exp exp ext ext ext fac fal far fed Fer fer fie fin fir fis fla flo flu fol for for fou fra fre Fre fro fut G-t gal gal gam gas Gau Gem gen geo geo geo gia Gli Gol gra gra gra gra gre gri gui H I Hag hal har hat He- hea hel Hel her Hes hie hig his hom hor hot Hub Hug hur hyd hyd hyg hyp ice ide ima Ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf ing inn ins ins int int int int int int int int inv Io ion iro isl iso iso Jac jet jud jur Kel Kep kil Klo Kui Lag lam Lap Lar lat law lea len lep Lib lig lim lin lin Lio lit loc LOF lon Lor low lum lun Lup Lyo mac mag mag mag mag mag mai man Mar mas mas mat Max mea mec Meg Mer Mer met met Met mic Mid Mil min Mir mit mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul mul mys nan Nat nau nec neo neu nev New NGC no nom non non nor not nuc nuc num nut obj obs obs occ ocu oft ome Oor ope opp opt opt orb ord ori ort osc out ove oxi pai pan par par par par pas pea pen per per per per Per per pha phi pho pho pho phy pio Pla pla pla pla Pla plu Poi pol pol pol poo pos pos pot pra pre pre pre pre pri pri pro pro pro pro pro Pro pro pse pul pur qua qua qua qua que rac rad rad rad rad rad rad ran rar ray rea rea rec rec red red ref ref reg rel rel rel ren res res res res ret rev Ric rig rin roc roo rot rot Rus Sac sal sat sca sca Sch sci Scu sec sec Sed sel Sel sen ser Sex Sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin siz sla Sma sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spi spr squ sta sta sta sta ste ste ste Sto Str str str sub sub suc sun sup sup sup sup sur swa syn syn tab tar tek tem ter tes the the the the Tho thr tid tim Tis Too Tor tra tra Tra tra tra tri tri tru Tul tur two Typ ult un- und uni uni unk upp Urc utt val var vec vel ver vib vio vir vis voi vor wan wat wav wax wea Wei whi Wil win WN9 wor X-r yel you zer zod > >>