An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
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فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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<< < -es -iv -ti 21- A r abe abs abs acc acc acc act act ada adi adu aff age alc Alf ali all alp alt ama amp ana ang ang ann ano ant ant ape apo app aps arc Arg ari art ass ast ast ast atm ato att aur aut axi B r bac Bal Bar Bar Bay bec Ber Bet Bie bij bin bio bis bla bla blu blu bol Bor bou Bra bre bro Bug C-s cal Cam can car Car Cas cat cav cel cen cer Cha cha cha che cho cir cir cir cla clo clo clu coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com com con con con con con con con con con con con coo cor cor cor cos cos cos Cou cou Cra Cre cri cro cub cur cyc cyl dar dat daw de- Deb dec dec dee def deg del Den dep der det deu dew dic dif dif dil dip dir dis dis dis dis dis div dog Dop dou dra dua dus dwa dyn e-m ear ecl eco eff ein Ein elb ele ele ele ele Els emi emp ene enr env epi equ equ Eri est Euc eva evo exc exc exh exo exp exp ext ext f-n Fah fam fau fee Fer fib fil fin fir fix fle flu foc for for for fra fre fre fri fun fuz gal gal gal Gan gau GCN gen geo geo geo geo Gl glo gra gra gra gra gra gre gro GW1 hab hal han HAR haz hea hel hel Hen Her heu Hig Hil hol hop hor hou Hub Hum Hyd hyd hyd hyp hys ide ign ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf inh INP ins ins int int int int Int int int int inv ion iri irr iso iso iso Jea Jos Jun K2 Kep key kin Kol lag lam Lan lar las lav lea leg len lev lig lim lin lin lin lis lob loc log lor low lum lun lun Lym Mac mag mag mag mag mag mai Mal mar mas mas mat max mea mea mee Men mer met met met mic mid Mil min Mir mix mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul muo mys nan nat nav nec Nep neu New New NGC nob nom non non nor not nuc nuc num Nyq obj obs obs oce oen OH omn opa ope opt opt opt orb ord Ori ort osc out ove oxy pal pan par Par par par pas pea Pen per per per per per pet pha pho pho pho phy pie Pit Pla pla pla pla ple Poi pol pol pol pol pop pos pos pow pre pre pre Pre pri pri pri pro pro pro pro pro pro Pro pub pul pyr qua qua qua qua Qui rad rad rad rad rad rad ram ran rat rea rec rec rec red ref ref reg reg rel rel rem rep res res res ret rev rho Rie rim riv rol Ros rot rul S a Sah san Sat sca Sch Sch scr sec sec sec sei sel sem sep set sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin sit sky slu sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spl spr sta sta sta sta sta ste ste sti sto str str sub sub sub sug sun sup sup sup sup sur syl syn sys tal Tay tel ten ter tex the the the thi tho thu tid tim tod top tot tra tra tra tra tri tri tro tru tur twi Typ UFO ult unc uni uni uni upg ura uti val var vec vel ver ver vig vir vis voc von wak Was wav wax wea wei whi Wie win WN6 wom X-r yel you zer zod > >>

Number of Results: 12948 Search : far
X-ray background
  پس-زمینه‌ی ِ ایکس، زمینه‌ی ِ ~   
pas-zamine-ye iks, zamine-ye ~ (#)

Fr.: fond de rayons X   

A diffuse background radiation in X-ray wavelengths which has several origins. At very low energies it is due to hot gas in the → Local Bubble. In the → soft X-ray energy band it comes from active galaxies at moderate redshifts. In → hard X-ray range the background is thought to be due to integrated emission from many → quasars at various redshifts.

X-ray; → background.

X-ray binary
  دورین ِ پرتو ِ ایکس   
dorin-e partow-e iks

Fr.: binaire X   

A binary star system where one of the stars has evolved and collapsed into an extremely dense body such as a → white dwarf, a → neutron star, or a → black hole. The enormous gravitational attraction of the massive, dense, but dim component pulls material from the brighter, less massive star in an → accretion disk. The gravitational potential energy of the accreted matter is converted to heat by → viscosity and eventually to high-energy photons in the X-ray range. The brightest X-ray binary is → Scorpius X-1.

X-ray; → binary.

X-ray burst
  بلک ِ پرتو ِ ایکس   
belk-e partow-e iks

Fr.: sursaut de rayonnement X   

A rapid and intense surge of X-ray emission from some sources. They often last less than one second followed by an exponential decrease of typically a few seconds to a minute. Most X-ray bursts are believed to arise in → X-ray binary systems due to nuclear fusion of material accreted onto a compact companion.

X-ray; → burst.

X-ray diffraction
  پراش ِ پرتو ِ ایکس   
parâš-e partow-e iks

Fr.: diffraction de rayons X   

The diffraction of X-rays by the atoms or ions of a crystal. The wavelength of X-rays are comparable to the size of interatomic spacings in solids. Since the atoms in a crystal are arranged in a set of regular planes, crystals serve as three-dimensional diffraction gratings for X-rays. Planes of repetition within the atomic structure of the mineral diffract the X-rays. The pattern of diffraction thus obtained is therefore used to identify minerals by bombarding them with X-rays.

X-ray; → diffraction.

X-ray Dim Isolated Neutron Star (XDINS)
  ستاره‌ی ِ نوترونی با پرتوهای ِ ایکس ِ نزار   
setâre-ye notroni bâ partowhâ-ye X-e nazâr

Fr.: étoile à neutron de faibles rayons X   

A member of a class of isolated, radio-silent → pulsars with peculiar properties. They show a purely thermal spectrum at X-ray energies with no evidence for a high-energy, power-law component often detected in other → isolated neutron star classes. The X-ray luminosity is 1031 - 1032 erg s-1, fully consistent with surface blackbody emission with temperatures ~ 40-100 eV and (radiation) radii of a few kilometers, as derived from X-ray spectral fits. With the only exception of RX J1856.5-3754, broad absorption features have been found in all XDINSs. These features have energies ~ 300 - 700 eV, equivalent widths of ~ 50 - 150 eV and, as in the case of RX J0720.4-3125, may be variable.

X-ray; → dim; → isolated; → neutron; → star.

X-ray Dissociation Region (XDR)
  ناحیه‌ی ِ واهزش ِ پرتوهای ِ ایکس   
nâhiye-ye vâhazeš-e partowhâ-ye X

Fr.: région de dissociation par rayons X   

A region of → molecular clouds whose chemistry is affected by → X-rays from neighboring sources.

X-ray; → dissociation; → region.

X-ray persistent
  پرتو ِ X پریستنده   
partow-e X paristandé

Fr.: rayons X persistants   

An → X-ray source that does not display emission → outbursts, in contrast to → X-ray transients.

X-ray; → persistent.

X-ray pulsar
  پولسار ِ پرتوهای ِ ایکس، تپار ِ ~ ~   
pulsâr-e partowhâ-ye iks, tapâr-e ~ ~

Fr.: pulsar X   

A regularly variable X-ray source in which the pulsation is associated with the rotation of a magnetized neutron star in an → X-ray binary. Periods range from a few seconds to a few minutes. Examples include Hercules X-1, Centaurus X-3, Cygnus X-3.

X-ray; → pulsar.

X-ray source
  خن ِ پرتو ِ ایکس   
xan-e partow-e iks

Fr.: source de rayons X   

An astronomical object whose dominant mechanism of radiation is through X-ray emission. X-ray sources contain an extremely hot gas at temperatures from 106 to 108 K. They are generated by various physical processes involving high energies, such as accretion on to a compact object, shock waves from supernovae, stellar winds, hot gas in stellar coronae, or hot spaces between galaxies in a cluster. The first celestial X-ray source, after the Sun, to be detected was → Scorpius X-1 by means of rocket flight (Giacconi et al. 1962).

X-ray; → source.

X-ray spectrometer
  بیناب‌سنج ِ پرتو ِ ایکس   
binâb-sanj-e partow-e iks (#)

Fr.: spectromètre de rayons X   

An instrument for producing an X-ray spectrum and measuring the wavelengths of its components.

X-ray; → spectrometer.

X-ray telescope
  تلسکوپ ِ پرتو ِ ایکس، دوربین ِ ~ ~   
teleskop-e patow-e iks (#), durbin-e ~ ~

Fr.: télescope de rayons X   

A telescope designed to focus X-rays from astronomical objects. X-ray telescopes function from orbital satellites because X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere. These telescopes require special techniques since the conventional methods used in optical and radio telescopes are not adequate. → grazing-incidence telescope; → Bragg angle.

X-ray; → telescope.

X-ray transient
  پرتو ِ X گذرا   
partow-e X gozarâ

Fr.: rayons X transitoire   

An → X-ray source that enhances its emission well above its usual level for a period typically longer than a week. Recurrences can be → periodic or → aperiodic, but there is no obvious correlation between recurrence time and the luminosity amplitude of the → outburst. X-ray transients seem to be divided into two classes: those associated with → high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) stars and those associated with → low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) stars. The HMXBs contain a → neutron star or → black hole paired with a → massive star. Often, the stellar companion is a → Be star, Be star, which sometimes sheds material from its equatorial region. In these systems, the transient event is characterized by having more higher energy X-rays in the spectrum. The LMXBs contain a neutron star or black hole orbiting around a cooler, → low-mass star. These transient events often generate more lower-energy X-rays.

X-ray; → transient.

X-wind model
  مدل ِ باد ِ X   
model-e bâd-e X

Fr.: modèle de vent X   

A → magnetocentrifugal model for → accretion and → outflow in → protostars, which considers the interaction between the → magnetosphere of a → young stellar object and an & rarr; accretion disk. The model assumes that the → magnetic field originates from the protostar, and the outflow is driven from a small region near the inner edge of the disk, called X, where the inner disk corotates with the star (→ corotation radius). The accretion disk is → truncated in its central region, that is the disk does not extend to the protostar. The matter spiraling toward the protostar is either funneled by the magnetic field connecting the star to the disk, or blown outward under the effect of → centrifugal force. The X-wind model is able to account for many observations in one fairly self-consistent model. The observations include time variable accretion/wind phenomena in → T Tauri stars, the slow rotation rates of T Tauri stars, protostellar X-ray activity, and a number of the properties of → bipolar jets and → molecular outflows (F. H. Shu et al., 2000, in Protostars and Planets IV, V. Mannings et al. (eds.), Tucson: Univ. Arizona Press, 789).

X, referring to a configuration of the magnetic field where the lines of force intersect with an "X" shape; → wind; → model.

xenon
  گزنون   
gezenon (#)

Fr.: xénon   

A colorless, odorless, tasteless, chemically un-reactive gas, belonging to the → inert gas group, occurring in exceedingly minute amounts in the air; symbol Xe. → Atomic number 54; → atomic weight 131.29; → melting point -111.9°C; → boiling point -107.1°C. Xenon was discovered spectroscopically in 1898 by William Ramsay and M. W. Travers, who obtained it by fractional distillation of an impure sample of liquid → krypton. The lightest → isotopes of xenon (124Xe and 126Xe) are produced during → supernova explosions; intermediate-mass isotopes (127Xe, 128Xe, 129Xe, 130Xe, 131Xe and 132Xe) are produced during the → Asymptotic Giant Branch phase of evolved low- and intermediate-mass stars; the heaviest isotopes (134Xe and 136Xe) are produced during the → merger of → neutron stars.

From Gk. xenon, neuter of xenos "strange," introduced by the discoverers.

XMM-Newton
   XMM نیوتن   
XMM-Newton

Fr.: XMM-Newton   

A European Space Agency's satellite, launched on 10 December 1999 and designed for the observation of → X-rays emitted by astronomical objects. The satellite carries three very advanced X-ray telescopes. The three corresponding European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) are sensitive over the energy range 0.2 keV to 12 keV. Other instruments on-board are two reflection grating spectrometers which are sensitive below about 2 keV, and a 30 cm diameter → Ritchey-Chretien optical/UV telescope. The telescope moves in a highly elliptical orbit, traveling out to nearly one third of the distance to the Moon and enabling long, uninterrupted observations of faint → X-ray sources. The original mission lifetime was two years, it has now been extended for further observations until at least 2010. Among recent results obtained using XMM-Newton one can mention an intermediate-mass black hole of over 500 solar masses in the galaxy ESO 243-49 (Nature 460, 73, 2009) and broad line emission from iron K- and L-shell transitions in the active galaxy 1H 0707-495 (Nature 459, 540, 2009). See also → X-ray astronomy.

XMM, from "X-ray Multi-Mirror;" Newton, in honor of Sir Isaac Newton, → newton.

Y dwarf
  کوتوله‌ی ِ Y   
kutule-ye Y

Fr.: naine Y   

A type of ultra-cool → brown dwarf with an → effective temperature lower than 500 K. → Near infrared spectra of these objects show deep absorption bands of H2O and CH4. So far only seven brown dwarf candidates belonging to this class have been found, all Y0 subtypes. These objects are very dim, with H magnitudes 19-23. See Cushing et al. 2011 (arXiv:1108.4678). The precise definition of the Y class requires new findings in the future about these objects.

For the choice of the letter Y, see Kirkpatrick et al. 1993, ApJ 406, 701; → dwarf.

Yagi antenna
  آنتن ِ یاگی   
ânten-e Yâgi (#)

Fr.: antenne de Yagi   

A very familiar antenna array, which is the commonest kind of terrestrial TV aerial to be found on the rooftops of houses. It consists of a single "feed" or "driven element," usually a dipole antenna. The rest of the elements help transmit the energy in a particular direction. These antennas typically operate in the HF to UHF bands (about 3 MHz to 3 GHz), although their bandwidth is typically small. In astronomy Yagi antennas are used as elements in some → radio interferometers. Same as Yagi-Uda antenna.

Named after the Japanese electrical engineer Hidetsuga Yagi (1886-1976); → antenna.

Yalode
  یالوده   
Yalode

Fr.: Yalodé   

The largest → impact crater on → Ceres after → Kerwan. It is adjacent to another large crater, called → Urvara. Yalode appears to have a series of canyons running from it, in a northwestern direction.

Named after Yalodé, the West African (Dahomeyan) deity of harvest.

Yarkovsky effect
  اُسکر ِ یارکوفسکی   
oskar-e Yarkovsky

Fr.: effet Yarkovski   

A phenomenon that causes a slow variation of the orbital elements of asteroids and meteoroids. It takes place because the surface thermal conductivity of these bodies is not negligible and the rotation of the body about its axis shifts the warmest region from midday to the object's afternoon hemisphere. Consequently the temperature distribution is asymmetric with respect to the Sun direction, and the momentum carried off by the photons emitted in the infrared has a net component along the orbital velocity of the asteroid. This causes a decrease or increase of its orbital energy depending on whether the rotation is prograde or retrograde. The bodies therefore spiral either sunward or outward. The secular drift of the semi-major axis of the orbit is estimated to be of the order of 10-4 A.U. per million years for a → near-Earth object with a diameter of 1 km. The effect is unimportant for bodies larger than a few km because of their very large mass per unit area (106 g cm-2 or more) and is especially unimportant for comets that spend little time under intense illumination close to the Sun. Compare with the → Poynting-Robertson effect, which is isotropic. See also → YORP effect.

Named after Ivan Osipovich Yarkovsky (1844-1902), a Russian-Polish civil engineer. Yarkovsky knew nothing of photons and based his reasoning on the → ether concept, but his idea survives the translation to modern physics; → effect.

year
  سال   
sâl (#)

Fr.: année, an   

In general, the time required for the Earth to complete one → revolution (approximately 3.154 × 107 seconds). Similarly, the time in which a planet completes its orbit around the Sun. In astronomy a distinction is made between various kinds of years, depending on the reference point used to measure the period of revolution: → anomalistic year; → Besselian year; → calendar year; → eclipse year; → embolismic year; → Galactic year; → Julian year; → leap year; → lunar year; → Platonic year; → sidereal year; → solar year; → Sothic year; → tropical year; → vernal-equinox year.

M.E. yeer; O.E. gēar (cf. O.S., O.H.G. jar, O.N. ar, Goth. jer, Du. jaar, Ger. Jahr); cf. O.Pers. dušiyāra- "evil year, bad harvest, famine" (from duš- "bad," → dys-, + yār- "year"); Av. yārə- "year;" Skt. paryārini- (*pari-yāram "a year long") "cow which has its first calf after a year;" Gk. hora "season, time of a day, year;" L. hornus "of this year;" → hour.

Sâl "year;" Mid.Pers. sâl "year;" Sogd. sarδ "year;" O.Pers. θrad- "year;" Av. sarəd- "year;" cf. Skt. śarád- "autumn;" maybe related to Lith. šilti "to become warm;" L. calor "heat," calere "to become warm;" PIE base *kele- "warm."

<< < -es -iv -ti 21- A r abe abs abs acc acc acc act act ada adi adu aff age alc Alf ali all alp alt ama amp ana ang ang ann ano ant ant ape apo app aps arc Arg ari art ass ast ast ast atm ato att aur aut axi B r bac Bal Bar Bar Bay bec Ber Bet Bie bij bin bio bis bla bla blu blu bol Bor bou Bra bre bro Bug C-s cal Cam can car Car Cas cat cav cel cen cer Cha cha cha che cho cir cir cir cla clo clo clu coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com com con con con con con con con con con con con coo cor cor cor cos cos cos Cou cou Cra Cre cri cro cub cur cyc cyl dar dat daw de- Deb dec dec dee def deg del Den dep der det deu dew dic dif dif dil dip dir dis dis dis dis dis div dog Dop dou dra dua dus dwa dyn e-m ear ecl eco eff ein Ein elb ele ele ele ele Els emi emp ene enr env epi equ equ Eri est Euc eva evo exc exc exh exo exp exp ext ext f-n Fah fam fau fee Fer fib fil fin fir fix fle flu foc for for for fra fre fre fri fun fuz gal gal gal Gan gau GCN gen geo geo geo geo Gl glo gra gra gra gra gra gre gro GW1 hab hal han HAR haz hea hel hel Hen Her heu Hig Hil hol hop hor hou Hub Hum Hyd hyd hyd hyp hys ide ign ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf inh INP ins ins int int int int Int int int int inv ion iri irr iso iso iso Jea Jos Jun K2 Kep key kin Kol lag lam Lan lar las lav lea leg len lev lig lim lin lin lin lis lob loc log lor low lum lun lun Lym Mac mag mag mag mag mag mai Mal mar mas mas mat max mea mea mee Men mer met met met mic mid Mil min Mir mix mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul muo mys nan nat nav nec Nep neu New New NGC nob nom non non nor not nuc nuc num Nyq obj obs obs oce oen OH omn opa ope opt opt opt orb ord Ori ort osc out ove oxy pal pan par Par par par pas pea Pen per per per per per pet pha pho pho pho phy pie Pit Pla pla pla pla ple Poi pol pol pol pol pop pos pos pow pre pre pre Pre pri pri pri pro pro pro pro pro pro Pro pub pul pyr qua qua qua qua Qui rad rad rad rad rad rad ram ran rat rea rec rec rec red ref ref reg reg rel rel rem rep res res res ret rev rho Rie rim riv rol Ros rot rul S a Sah san Sat sca Sch Sch scr sec sec sec sei sel sem sep set sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin sit sky slu sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spl spr sta sta sta sta sta ste ste sti sto str str sub sub sub sug sun sup sup sup sup sur syl syn sys tal Tay tel ten ter tex the the the thi tho thu tid tim tod top tot tra tra tra tra tri tri tro tru tur twi Typ UFO ult unc uni uni uni upg ura uti val var vec vel ver ver vig vir vis voc von wak Was wav wax wea wei whi Wie win WN6 wom X-r yel you zer zod > >>