An Etymological Dictionary of Astronomy and Astrophysics
English-French-Persian

فرهنگ ریشه شناختی اخترشناسی-اخترفیزیک

M. Heydari-Malayeri    -    Paris Observatory

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<< < -es -iv -ti 21- A r abe abs abs acc acc acc act act ada adi adu aff age alc Alf ali all alp alt ama amp ana ang ang ann ano ant ant ape apo app aps arc Arg ari art ass ast ast ast atm ato att aur aut axi B r bac Bal Bar Bar Bay bec Ber Bet Bie bij bin bio bis bla bla blu blu bol Bor bou Bra bre bro Bug C-s cal Cam can car Car Cas cat cav cel cen cer Cha cha cha che cho cir cir cir cla clo clo clu coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com com con con con con con con con con con con con coo cor cor cor cos cos cos Cou cou Cra Cre cri cro cub cur cyc cyl dar dat daw de- Deb dec dec dee def deg del Den dep der det deu dew dic dif dif dil dip dir dis dis dis dis dis div dog Dop dou dra dua dus dwa dyn e-m ear ecl eco eff ein Ein elb ele ele ele ele Els emi emp ene enr env epi equ equ Eri est Euc eva evo exc exc exh exo exp exp ext ext f-n Fah fam fau fee Fer fib fil fin fir fix fle flu foc for for for fra fre fre fri fun fuz gal gal gal Gan gau GCN gen geo geo geo geo Gl glo gra gra gra gra gra gre gro GW1 hab hal han HAR haz hea hel hel Hen Her heu Hig Hil hol hop hor hou Hub Hum Hyd hyd hyd hyp hys ide ign ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf inh INP ins ins int int int int Int int int int inv ion iri irr iso iso iso Jea Jos Jun K2 Kep key kin Kol lag lam Lan lar las lav lea leg len lev lig lim lin lin lin lis lob loc log lor low lum lun lun Lym Mac mag mag mag mag mag mai Mal mar mas mas mat max mea mea mee Men mer met met met mic mid Mil min Mir mix mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul muo mys nan nat nav nec Nep neu New New NGC nob nom non non nor not nuc nuc num Nyq obj obs obs oce oen OH omn opa ope opt opt opt orb ord Ori ort osc out ove oxy pal pan par Par par par pas pea Pen per per per per per pet pha pho pho pho phy pie Pit Pla pla pla pla ple Poi pol pol pol pol pop pos pos pow pre pre pre Pre pri pri pri pro pro pro pro pro pro Pro pub pul pyr qua qua qua qua Qui rad rad rad rad rad rad ram ran rat rea rec rec rec red ref ref reg reg rel rel rem rep res res res ret rev rho Rie rim riv rol Ros rot rul S a Sah san Sat sca Sch Sch scr sec sec sec sei sel sem sep set sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin sit sky slu sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spl spr sta sta sta sta sta ste ste sti sto str str sub sub sub sug sun sup sup sup sup sur syl syn sys tal Tay tel ten ter tex the the the thi tho thu tid tim tod top tot tra tra tra tra tri tri tro tru tur twi Typ UFO ult unc uni uni uni upg ura uti val var vec vel ver ver vig vir vis voc von wak Was wav wax wea wei whi Wie win WN6 wom X-r yel you zer zod > >>

Number of Results: 12948 Search : far
Langevin equation
  هموگش ِ لانژون   
hamugeš-e Langevin

Fr.: équation de Langevin   

Equation of motion for a weakly ionized cold plasma.

Paul Langevin (1872-1946), French physicist, who developed the theory of magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic gas; → equation.

Langmuir wave
  موج ِ لانگموییر   
mowj-e Langmuir

Fr.: onde de Langmuir   

A disturbance of a → plasma in the form of a longitudinal, → electrostatic wave that propagates in the plasma due to variations in the plasma's electron density. More specifically, Langmuir waves are collective oscillations of inhomogeneous bunches of electrons displaced from their natural equilibrium, in which the inertia of the relatively massive ions serves to establish an electrostatic restoring force that tries to bring the electrons back to their equilibrium positions. → Landau damping causes dissipation of Langmuir waves as the electrons are either accelerated or decelerated so as to be in resonance with the phase velocity of the waves themselves.

Irving Langmuir (1881-1957), American chemist and physicist, Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1932; → wave.

Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism
  ساز-و-کار ِ لنگموییر-هینشلوود   
sâzokâr-e Langmuir-Hinshelwood

Fr.: mécanisme de Langmuir-Hinshelwood   

Suggested by Irving Langmuir (1881-1957) in 1921, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1932 for his work in surface chemistry. And further developed by Cyril Hinshelwood (1897-1967) in 1926, who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1956 for his researches into the mechanism of chemical reactions.

language
  زبان   
zabân (#)

Fr.: langue   

Any means of conveying or communicating ideas; specifically, human speech.

M.E., from O.Fr. langage, from L. lingua "tongue; speech, language."

Zabân "tongue; language," from Mid.Pers. uzwân "tongue; language;" O.Pers. hzanm, hizânam "tongue," Av. hizuua-, hizū- "tongue;" cf. Skt. jivhā- "tongue;" L. lingua "tongue, speech, language;" O.Ir. tenge; Welsh tafod; Lith. liezuvis; O.C.S. jezyku; M.Du. tonghe; Du. tong; O.H.G. zunga; Ger. Zunge; Goth. tuggo; PIE base *dnghwa-.

language paleontology
  پارین‌شناسی ِ زبانی   
pârinšenâsi-ye zabâni

Fr.: paléontologie linguistique   

An approach in which terms reconstructed in the → proto-language are used to make inferences about its speakers' culture and environment.

language;→ paleontology.

Laniakea supercluster
  ابرخوشه‌ی ِ لانیاکءا   
abarxuše-ye Laniakea

Fr.: superamas Laniakea   

A → supercluster of galaxies that includes our → Local Group and about 300 to 500 known → galaxy clusters and groups. Also called → Local Supercluster. If approximated as round, it has a diameter of 12,000 km s-1 in units of the → cosmic expansion or 160 megaparsecs, and encompasses about 1017 → solar masses. Our Local Group lies toward the outer regions of Laniakea. Its main components are the four previously known superclusters: → Virgo supercluster (the part where the → Milky Way resides), Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster (including the → Great Attractor, Antlia Wall, known as Hydra Supercluster, → Centaurus supercluster), Pavo-Indus Supercluster, and Southern Supercluster (including Fornax Cluster, Dorado and Eridanus clouds). The most massive galaxy clusters of Laniakea are Virgo, Hydra, Centaurus, Abell 3565, Abell 3574, Abell 3521, Fornax, Eridanus, and Norma. The Laniakea supercluster was discovered by Tully et al. (2014, Nature 513, 71).

From the Hawaiian words lani "heaven," and akea "spacious, immeasurable;" → supercluster.

lanthanide
  لانتانید   
lântânid (#)

Fr.: lanthanide   

Any of the series of 15 consecutive → chemical elements in the → periodic table from → lanthanum to lutetium (→ atomic numbers 57 to 71 inclusive). The atoms of these metals have similar configurations and similar physical and chemical properties. They are grouped apart from the rest of the elements in the → Periodic Table because they all behave in a similar way in chemical reactions. Also called → rare-earth element. International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry currently recommends the name lanthanoid rather than lanthanide.

From the chemical element → lanthanum.

lanthanum (La)
  لانتانوم   
lântânom (#)

Fr.: lanthanum   

A soft, malleable, ductile, silver-white metallic → chemical element; symbol La. → atomic number 57; → atomic weight 138.9055; → melting point about 920°C; → boiling point about 3,460°C; → specific gravity 6.19 at 25°C; → valence +3. Lanthanum is a member of the → lanthanide group, also called → rare-earth elements. Two naturally occurring → isotopes of lanthanum are known, 139La (more than 99%) and 138La (less than 0.1%). The → half-life of 138La is 1.1 x 1011 years.

From lanthan- + suffix -um, variant of → -ium. The first component from Gk. lanthanein for "to lie hidden, to escape notice" because it hid in cerium ore and was difficult to separate from that rare-earth mineral. It was discovered in the form lanthanium oxide, called lanthana, by the Swedish surgeon and chemist Carl-Gustav Mosander (1797-1858) in 1839. Subsequently, in 1842, Mosander separated his lanthanium sample into two oxides; for one of these he retained the name lanthanum and for the other he gave the name didymium (or twin).

Laplace
  لاپلاس   
Laplace

Fr.: Laplace   

The French great mathematician, physicist, and astronomer Pierre-Simon Marquis de Laplace (1749-1827). → Laplace operator; → Laplace plane; → Laplace resonance; → Laplace transform; → Laplace's demon ; → Laplace's equation ; → Kant-Laplace hypothesis

Laplace operator
  آپارگر ِ لاپلاس   
âpârgar-e Laplace

Fr.: opérateur de Laplace   

Same as → Laplacian.

Laplace; → operator.

Laplace plane
  هامن ِ لاپلاس   
hâmon-e Laplace

Fr.: plan de Laplace   

The plane normal to the axis about which the pole of a satellite's orbit → precesses. In his study of Jupiter's satellites, Laplace (1805) recognized that the combined effects of the solar tide and the planet's oblateness induced a "proper" inclination in satellite orbits with respect to Jupiter's equator. He remarked that this proper inclination increases with the distance to the planet, and defined an orbital plane (currently called Laplace plane) for circular orbits that lies between the orbital plane of the planet's motion around the Sun and its equator plane (Tremaine et al., 2009, AJ, 137, 3706).

Laplace; → plane.

Laplace resonance
  باز‌آوایی ِ لاپلاس   
bâzâvâyi-ye Laplace

Fr.: résonance de Laplace   

An → orbital resonance that makes a 4:2:1 period ratio among three bodies in orbit. The → Galilean satellites → Io, → Europa, → Ganymede are in the Laplace resonance that keeps their orbits elliptical. This interaction prevents the orbits of the satellites from becoming perfectly circular (due to tidal interactions with Jupiter), and therefore permits → tidal heating of Io and Europa. For every four orbits of Io, Europa orbits twice and Ganymede orbits once. Io cannot keep one side exactly facing Jupiter and with the varying strengths of the tides because of its elliptical orbit, Io is stretched and twisted over short time periods.

This commensurability was first pointed out by Pierre-Simon Laplace, → Laplace; → resonance.

Laplace transform
  ترادیس ِ لاپلاس   
tarâdis-e Laplace (#)

Fr.: transformée de Laplace   

An integral transform of a function obtained by multiplying the given function f(t) by e-pt, where p is a new variable, and integrating with respect to t from t = 0 to t = ∞.

Laplace; → transform.

Laplace's demon
  پری ِ لاپلاس   
pari-ye Laplace

Fr.: démon de Laplace   

An imaginary super-intelligent being who knows all the laws of nature and all the parameters describing the state of the Universe at a given moment can predict all subsequent events by virtue of using physical laws. In the introduction to his 1814 Essai philosophique sur les probabilités, Pierre-Simon Laplace puts forward this concept to uphold → determinism, namely the belief that the past completely determines the future. The relevance of this statement, however, has been called into question by quantum physics laws and the discovery of → chaotic systems.

Laplace; → demon.

Laplace's equation
  هموگش ِ لاپلاس   
hamugeš-e Laplace

Fr.: équation de Laplace   

A → linear differential equation of the second order the solutions of which are important in many fields of science, mainly in electromagnetism, fluid dynamics, and is often used in astronomy. It is expressed by: ∂2V/ ∂x2 + ∂2V/ ∂y2 + ∂2V/ ∂z2 = 0. Laplace's equation can more concisely expressed by: ∇2V = 0. The function V may, for example, be the potential at any point in the electric field where there is no free charge. The general theory of solutions to Laplace's equation is known as potential theory.

Laplace; → equation.

Laplacian
  لاپلاسی   
lâplâsi (#)

Fr.: laplacien   

A differential → operator, denoted ∇2 = ∇.∇, which is the sum of all second partial derivatives of a dependant variable: ∇2≡ ∂2/∂x2 + ∂2/∂y2 + ∂2/∂z2, in Cartesian coordinates. It has numerous applications in several fields of physics and mathematics. Also called Laplace operator.

Named after → Laplace.

large
  بزرگ   
bozorg (#)

Fr.: grand   

Of more than average size, quantity, degree, etc.; of great scope or range.

From O.Fr. large "broad, wide," from L. largus "abundant, copious, plentiful," of unknown origin.

Bozorg "great, large, immense, grand, magnificient;" Mid.Pers. vazurg "great, big, high, lofty;" O.Pers. vazarka- "great;" Av. vazra- "club, mace" (Mod.Pers. gorz "mace"); cf. Skt. vájra- "(Indra's) thunderbolt," vaja- "strength, speed;" L. vigere "be lively, thrive," velox "fast, lively," vegere "to enliven," vigil "watchful, awake;" P.Gmc. *waken (Du. waken; O.H.G. wahhen; Ger. wachen "to be awake;" E. wake); PIE base *weg- "to be strong, be lively."

Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC)
  ابر ِ بزرگ ِ ماژلان   
Abr-e Bozorg-e Magellan (#)

Fr.: Grand Nuage de Magellan   

The larger of the two Magellanic Cloud galaxies visible in the southern hemisphere at about 22 degrees from the South Celestial Pole. It is approximately on the border between the constellations → Dorado and → Mensa in a region of faint stars. The center of the LMC is approximately RA: 5h 23m 35s, dec: -69° 45' 22''. The LMC shines with a total → apparent visual magnitude of approximately zero. It spans an area of the sky about 9 by 11 degrees, corresponding to about 30,000 → light-years across in the longest dimension, for a distance of some 162,000 light-years. It has a visible mass of about one-tenth that of our own Galaxy (1010 Msun). The LMC and its twin, the → Small Magellanic Cloud, are two of our most prominent Galactic neighbors. The LMC is classified as a disrupted → barred spiral galaxy of type SBm, the prototype of a class of → Magellanic spirals. The galaxy is characterized by a prominent offset → stellar bar located near its center with the dominant → spiral arm to the north with two "embryonic" arms situated to the south. The → metallicity in the LMC is known to be lower than in the solar neighborhood by a factor 2 or more. Based on 20 → eclipsing binary systems, the distance to the LMC is measured to one percent precision to be 49.59±0.09 (statistical) ±0.54 (systematic) kpc (Pietrzynski et al., 2019, Nature 567, 200).

large; → Magellanic; → cloud.

large number
  عدد ِ بزرگ   
adad-e bozorg

Fr.: grand nombre   

A → dimensionless number representing the ratio of various → physical constants. For example:
1) The ratio of the → Coulomb force to the → gravitational force for a proton-electron pair (e2/Gmpme), which is of the order of 1040.
2) The age of Universe (T = 10-20 x 109 years) in units of the → elementary time: T/te≅ 1040.
3) The square root of the total number of particles in the Universe ≅ 1040.

large; → number.

large number hypothesis
  انگاره‌ی ِ عددهای ِ بزرگ   
engâre-ye adadhâ-ye bozorg

Fr.: hypothèse des grands nombres   

The idea whereby the coincidence of various → large numbers would bear a profound sense as to the nature of physical laws and the Universe. Dirac suggested that the coincidence seen among various large numbers of different nature is not accidental but must point to a hitherto unknown theory linking the quantum mechanical origin of the Universe to the various cosmological parameters. As a consequence, some of the → fundamental constants cannot remain unchanged for ever. According to Dirac's hypothesis, atomic parameters cannot change with time and hence the → gravitational constant should vary inversely with time (G∝ 1/t). Dirac, P. A. M., 1937, Nature 139, 323; 1938, Proc. R. Soc. A165, 199.

large; → number; → hypothesis.

<< < -es -iv -ti 21- A r abe abs abs acc acc acc act act ada adi adu aff age alc Alf ali all alp alt ama amp ana ang ang ann ano ant ant ape apo app aps arc Arg ari art ass ast ast ast atm ato att aur aut axi B r bac Bal Bar Bar Bay bec Ber Bet Bie bij bin bio bis bla bla blu blu bol Bor bou Bra bre bro Bug C-s cal Cam can car Car Cas cat cav cel cen cer Cha cha cha che cho cir cir cir cla clo clo clu coa coe coh col col col com com com com com com com com com con con con con con con con con con con con coo cor cor cor cos cos cos Cou cou Cra Cre cri cro cub cur cyc cyl dar dat daw de- Deb dec dec dee def deg del Den dep der det deu dew dic dif dif dil dip dir dis dis dis dis dis div dog Dop dou dra dua dus dwa dyn e-m ear ecl eco eff ein Ein elb ele ele ele ele Els emi emp ene enr env epi equ equ Eri est Euc eva evo exc exc exh exo exp exp ext ext f-n Fah fam fau fee Fer fib fil fin fir fix fle flu foc for for for fra fre fre fri fun fuz gal gal gal Gan gau GCN gen geo geo geo geo Gl glo gra gra gra gra gra gre gro GW1 hab hal han HAR haz hea hel hel Hen Her heu Hig Hil hol hop hor hou Hub Hum Hyd hyd hyd hyp hys ide ign ima imp imp inc inc ind ine inf inf inf inh INP ins ins int int int int Int int int int inv ion iri irr iso iso iso Jea Jos Jun K2 Kep key kin Kol lag lam Lan lar las lav lea leg len lev lig lim lin lin lin lis lob loc log lor low lum lun lun Lym Mac mag mag mag mag mag mai Mal mar mas mas mat max mea mea mee Men mer met met met mic mid Mil min Mir mix mod mod mol mon Mor mou mul muo mys nan nat nav nec Nep neu New New NGC nob nom non non nor not nuc nuc num Nyq obj obs obs oce oen OH omn opa ope opt opt opt orb ord Ori ort osc out ove oxy pal pan par Par par par pas pea Pen per per per per per pet pha pho pho pho phy pie Pit Pla pla pla pla ple Poi pol pol pol pol pop pos pos pow pre pre pre Pre pri pri pri pro pro pro pro pro pro Pro pub pul pyr qua qua qua qua Qui rad rad rad rad rad rad ram ran rat rea rec rec rec red ref ref reg reg rel rel rem rep res res res ret rev rho Rie rim riv rol Ros rot rul S a Sah san Sat sca Sch Sch scr sec sec sec sei sel sem sep set sha she sho sid sig sil sim sin sit sky slu sno sof sol sol sol sol sou sou spa spa spe spe spe sph spi spl spr sta sta sta sta sta ste ste sti sto str str sub sub sub sug sun sup sup sup sup sur syl syn sys tal Tay tel ten ter tex the the the thi tho thu tid tim tod top tot tra tra tra tra tri tri tro tru tur twi Typ UFO ult unc uni uni uni upg ura uti val var vec vel ver ver vig vir vis voc von wak Was wav wax wea wei whi Wie win WN6 wom X-r yel you zer zod > >>